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In one of the hallucinating scenes in a video I have played. The vision is blurry and objects nearer the edges of the screen are green and red

Now the usual chromatic aberration patterns are purple/green and red/cyan but is green and red possible through simply shooting the photo?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G3Zakv1eNA&t=4m30s

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    \$\begingroup\$ 1. It's a video. 2. It's computer generated. 3. Parts of the video may be intended to be viewed with anaglyph 3d glasses. \$\endgroup\$
    – xiota
    Aug 16, 2019 at 20:04
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    \$\begingroup\$ @xiota It doesn't even work as anaglyph. It's not even a very good fake anaglyph. The thin branch on the left is mostly horizontal but it still shows the effect. The dark specks below it are even more extreme. It might pass as a decent fake for someone whose red eye is directly below their cyan eye. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 16, 2019 at 20:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ @JohnDvorak That's because they're "hallucinating scenes". \$\endgroup\$
    – xiota
    Aug 16, 2019 at 20:33

2 Answers 2

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Now the usual chromatic aberration patterns are purple/green and red/cyan but is green and red possible through simply shooting the photo?

What photo? The video linked in the question is computer generated video. Each frame is computer generated, not a photo.

If you wish to see green and red CA in a photo it's fairly easy to do. Just use negative film under conditions (lens with uncorrected or poorly corrected CA, direction of lights source(s), etc.) that produce CA. and don't reverse the colors when printing/scanning. Green is opposite magenta on the color wheel. Red is opposite cyan. Of course everything else in the frame will also have the color reversed as well.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Can you add a scan of a negative to demonatrate this actually occurs? \$\endgroup\$
    – xiota
    Aug 18, 2019 at 10:33
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Some scenes in the computer-generated video may be intended to be viewed with anaglyph 3D glasses.

Red-green chromatic aberration is not normally possible because green is in the "middle" of the spectrum when colors are separated (with red and blue on either side).

chromatic aberration

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  • \$\begingroup\$ If you filter all the blue out of the result.... \$\endgroup\$ Aug 16, 2019 at 20:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ @rackandboneman You'll have bigger problems than chromatic aberration. \$\endgroup\$
    – xiota
    Aug 16, 2019 at 20:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ Bigger problems than chromatic aberration seem to be the exact visual intent? \$\endgroup\$ Aug 16, 2019 at 21:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ The picture would be yellow. \$\endgroup\$
    – xiota
    Aug 16, 2019 at 21:06

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