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Currently I'm having my staff take mass pictures of items from convenient store in order to populate the images of items in our e-commerce site.

I have a Canon EOS 200D camera.

My target resolution is 400x400 pixels. The problem is that the least amount of resolution I have available is S2, which is 2400x1600 (way more than I need).

enter image description here

  • How can I enter a custom image size straight from the camera (to skip having to resize every time)
  • If the above is not possible, can I go to a lower resolution than S2? I noticed that in other tutorials online, there is the S3 resolution option:

enter image description here - last but not least: is there a way to custom enter the image name for each image? I ask b/c I'm looking for a programmatic way to cross reference the image names with an item unique id (ie barcode number or something)

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    @xiota and everyone else, this site is about answering questions, not closing them. If something is impossible, then it should be explained, as an answer. I'm not against closing questions that are off-topic, but there is just too much haste to close questions here. This question was asked 50 minutes ago, by a site newcomer. – osullic Apr 24 at 8:44
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    @abbood "to skip having to resize every time"... This is also being done programmatically, right? Is this really a problem? – osullic Apr 24 at 8:50
  • Create a private instagram account. Get staff to use a smartphone to post images to the account - with whatever notes you want in the descriptions to link to your product IDs. Resize images to lower resolution (using IFTTT?) Or get someone to write a bespoke app for you. – dav1dsm1th Apr 24 at 9:03
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    @xiota I rolled back your edit because I really don't see the need for the creation of a tag named impossible. Please see the Meta Stack Exchange question How do I correctly tag my questions?, noting, "don't use meta tags. – scottbb Apr 24 at 11:46
  • I voted to close your question as too broad because you are asking two mostly unrelated questions: A) how to set a custom resolution in camera; and B) how to set a custom name for each image in camera for use with cataloging with barcodes. These are separate question, with separate issues about how to deal with or work around them. – scottbb Apr 24 at 11:51
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If you change the aspect ratio of saved images to 1:1, the lowest available resolution option for the EOS Rebel SL2/200D is 1600x1600 pixels. How to change the camera's aspect ratio is covered in the EOS Rebel SL2/200D User Manual.

How can I enter a custom image size straight from the camera (to skip having to resize every time)

You can't unless you write your own firmware for the camera.

If the above is not possible, can I go to a lower resolution than S2? I noticed that in other tutorials online, there is the S3 resolution option:

The EOS Rebel SL2/200D does not offer an S3 option. Some other Canon EOS cameras offer an S3 option. For example, the EOS 5Ds with a 50 MP sensor: set to 1:1 aspect ratio it has a 640 x 640 pixel S3 option. The video you linked is for the EOS Rebel T3i/600D. When set to 4:3 aspect ratio (it does not offer a 1:1 aspect ratio), it offers an S3 resolution of 640x480 pixels.

last but not least: is there a way to custom enter the image name for each image?

Not in the way you desire. Folder and file names on camera memory cards are governed by the Design rule for Camera File system standard. Images must be stored in a folder named 'DCIM' and in subfolders that also must meet certain naming conventions.

DCIM is short for Digital Camera IMages and is part of the industry standard outlined by the Design rule for Camera File system. This standard was adopted as the de facto standard for storing digital image and sound files in memory devices by the digital camera industry to insure interoperability from one brand to the next.

From Wikipedia:

Design rule for Camera File system (DCF) is a JEITA specification (number CP-3461) which defines a file system for digital cameras, including the directory structure, file naming method, character set, file format, and metadata format. It is currently the de facto industry standard for digital still cameras. The file format of DCF conforms to the Exif specification, but the DCF specification also allows use of any other file formats.

The default form of an image file name is IMG_0001.

  • It must be 8 characters in length.
  • The first four characters may use A-Z, 0-9, and _ (except for the first character which can not be an _ - This is because when you are working in the AdobeRGB color space instead of sRGB, the first digit will be replaced with an underscore _).
  • The last four characters can only be numbers between 0-9. They are assigned by the camera in sequence as each image (or video) is successively taken. When the last four characters reach '9999' the camera automatically creates a new folder (also assigned in sequence based on the naming convention requirements) and begins again with image '0001' (it skips '0000').

There are certain ways to instruct the camera to create new folder and reset file numbers when certain conditions are reached. Whatever options the EOS Rebel SL2/200D offers with regard to file names are covered in the EOS Rebel SL2/200D User Manual.

Some Canon cameras allow modifying the standard 'IMG_' prefix to a user selected four character string that complies with the above requirements. I doubt the entry level Rebel SL2/200D does, but you can alway check the EOS Rebel SL2/200D User Manual. Models that do allow this customization include instructions on how to do it in the Manual.

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last but not least: is there a way to custom enter the image name for each image? I ask b/c I'm looking for a programmatic way to cross reference the image names with an item unique id (ie barcode number or something)

Since you have to scale/crop the image anyway (which can be scripted), it would be feasible to shoot the object together with its barcode(same shot or next shot in series), get the barcode with OCR and rename the file from that.

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