2
\$\begingroup\$

How is the diagonal blurring and smoothing effect in this photograph achieved? I know it was taken on an iPhone (by photographer Karen Axelrad) with a shutter delay app. What post process creates such a look?

image

\$\endgroup\$
0

3 Answers 3

4
\$\begingroup\$

I notice 2 things about this image that stand out. It's not clear if they're the same 2 things you're seeing, but what I see is a slight diagonal blurring, and a smoothing effect. The diagonal blurring can be achieved in-camera by moving the camera during a long exposure. (In this case, "long" could still be a fraction of a second, but enough to get just a little motion.) It could also be done in post using a Directional Blur (sometimes called "Motion Blur") filter. It performs a blur along a line.

The smoothing effect looks to me like a median filter. A median filter smooths out similar areas while preserving sharp edges.

\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

I took this photo on an iPhone using the SlowShutter app. It was processed in the iColorama and Brushstroke apps and then blended in SuperimposeX app.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ A couple of links would be helpful. \$\endgroup\$
    – Eric S
    Dec 21, 2022 at 19:31
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Hi Karen! Welcome to Photo-SE! It's always great when photographers come in and answer questions about their work. =) \$\endgroup\$
    – scottbb
    Dec 21, 2022 at 23:07
1
\$\begingroup\$

If you don't mind command-line processing, Fred's ImageMagick Scripts may be helpful.

There are over 350 image-manipulation scripts there, including six that have "blur" in their name. They all come with embedded textual documentation, and the website has photo examples for many of them, too.

In particular, camerablur -t motion -r 45 filename looks like it might do what you want.

# USAGE: camerablur [-t type] [-a amount] [-r rotation] infile outfile
# USAGE: camerablur [-h or -help]
#
# OPTIONS:
#
# -t     type          type of blur; choices are: motion (or m) or 
#                      defocus (or d); default=defocus
# -a     amount        amount of blur; either length of motion blur or 
#                      diameter of defocus; float>0; default=10
# -r     rotation      rotation angle clockwise from horizontal for the 
#                      motion blur; floats; -180<=rotation<=180; default=0
# 
\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.