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I'm new to having a camera and I'm not sure how everything works with my DSLR.

I have a T6, and I would like to take pictures with flash without the kids squinting and that it is fast when I shoot. I am not sure how I should be choosing the lenses.

I currently own a Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III and the EF-S 18-55mm.

  • I've removed the second question you asked here as recommendations for off-site resources are off-topic here. – Philip Kendall Jan 7 at 20:45
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    What lenses do you currently own? – Philip Kendall Jan 7 at 20:46
  • I currently own Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Lens and the EF-S 18-55mm – Yesi Jan 11 at 1:54
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I'm new to having a camera and I'm not sure how everything works with my DSLR.

Just basic advice, but before buying anything, I'd say practice enough to be comfortable with using your camera. Bad technique will follow you to new gear, and getting a new piece of equipment can exacerbate the complexity of the picture when you're learning.

That said,

I have a T6, and I would like to take pictures with flash without the kids squinting and that it is fast when I shoot.

The way flashes work is that they use a large capacitor to release a ton of charge all at once to fire off the flash tube. That capacitor takes time to "fill" from the batteries. So, trying to burst shoot in rapid succession may not be possible, given how long it can take the capacitor to "refill". The only way to get the flash to be ready faster is to shoot at lower power and not use up all the charge at once. So, you may need to increase iso or aperture.

To keep the kids from squinting, I'd actually recommend not using direct flash, but to get a hotshoe flash (speedlight), and bounce it (aim the head at a reflective surface, like the ceiling or wall), and use the reflected light as your illumination. Flagging off the head so there's no direct light will also look more pleasing, as well as avoid blasting someone in the face with the light.

A used 580EXII or a Godox TT685C (at the time of this writing) aren't too expensive and good solid flashes. But the TT685C is better if you think you might do off-camera lighting setups, because it has radio triggering built-in. See also: What features should one look for when selecting a flash?

I am not sure how I should be choosing the lenses.

It may be too early to consider buying a lens if you don't know why you want a new lens.

Lenses have two main specs: the focal length and the maximum aperture. The focal length affects the magnification and field of view; the maximum aperture affects the depth of field and limits how fast your shutter speed can be without adding flash. When shooting portraits, most folks favor a slightly telephoto prime lens, such as a 50mm f/1.8 or 85mm f/1.8; but you can also just use the 18-55 kit lens until you figure out what it is about it you'd most want to change for portrait shooting.

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For individual portraits, you could start off with a 50mm which on a cropped factor camera of x 1.6 would be like using an 85mm lens which is considered by many to be the ideal focal range for portraits. As the cheaper 50mm lenses also go down to an aperture of f:1.8, it will also allow you to take shots with a great shallow depth of field.

as for flash, I would choose a canon 580 mkII they are very affordable and easy to use. depending on how serious you are and learning curve you could use up to four of them and set them up just as you would with studio lights some with small softboxes others with dishes/defusers background lights or reflecting.

there are other lenses/flashes out there far more expensive but for someone just starting out, I'd recommend the above.

good luck,

ps. I find photographing kids great fun and have made further contacts from it.

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