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I've tried to shoot the red line of sunrise along the sea and I've done that from under a very low bridge with the penumbra, so I' ve captured some portions of the sand and palm trees too. I tried it twice but even if I shot with a manual lens and camera settings I gained a color flickering between some pictures, and it occurs until ten minutes before the golden hour.

My manual lens is a "Nikon 28mm 2.8 ai-s" which turns into a 42mm on my Nikon d3200 camera. Of course I used an intervalometer and shot in RAW.
The first time my settings were:

  • shutter speed - 1/20, diaphragm closed to 8, exposure meter set to 0, iso 200, 13 minutes shoot time, 3 seconds of interval.

The second time they were:

  • shutter speed - 1/15, diaphragm closed to 11, esposure meter set to +2, iso 400, 25 minutes shoot time, 4 seconds of interval.

Both times I set white balance to - direct sunlight. Sometimes the colors change tonality, the sand becomes purple and the sky changes colour from blue/dark blue to light blue. There has been an exception though when I set my values in another different way:

  • shutter speed - 1/20, diaphragm closed to 5.6, exposure meter set to +5, iso 400, 12 minutes shoot time, 4 seconds of interval. In this last case there weren't clouds in the sky and everything was brighter, no color flickering occured.

I read that when there's no much light the camera could not interpret colours in the same way, but I find it bizzarre. Why does the camera read colors differently at every shot and why it doesn't do that in normal video mode?
How can I solve this problem? I planned to make new shots outside the bridge, maybe something can change. I am hopeful it is just an incorrect setting. Is ND filter necessary?
I'm just interested now in timelapses then I'm a beginner.

  • What you are experiencing is the shot-to-shot variability that is a natural consequence of the mechanical linkage between the Nikon camera body and lens. It's why other camera companies (Minolta and Canon) went to an all electronic mount as early as the late 1980s. This same question has been asked and answered before: How can I cancel aperture resetting between subsequent image shots of a timelapse? – Michael C Dec 11 '18 at 17:20
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    Was Active D-Lighting enabled for those shots? What software are you post-processing with? You specified all the exposure settings, which leads me to believe you were in Manual mode, but setting EV to +2 or +5 does nothing in Manual mode. Were you in Manual mode? – scottbb Dec 12 '18 at 18:43
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    @Christian Your lens opens up to the maximum aperture between shots, does it not? Regardless of what setting is selected by the aperture ring on the lens, doesn't the camera only stop down the lens via the aperture lever immediately before the shutter is opened, and then let it open back up immediately after the shitter is closed? The ring on the lens limits how far the camera's aperture linkage can close down the aperture, but it doesn't actually stop down the lens until the camera's lever moves against the linkage on the back of the lens. – Michael C Dec 14 '18 at 3:06
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    The variability between the exact amount of movement of the aperture diaphragm for each successive exposure, when the camera stops down the lens again for each shot, is what causes the variability of exposure between frames, even when the aperture value is manually selected. Each time the camera's aperture lever presses the pin on the back of the lens and the aperture mechanism is moved until the 'stop' for a particular aperture setting prevents it from closing down further, the iris can be slightly more or less open than the time before and the time after, even with the dame f-number set. – Michael C Dec 14 '18 at 3:11
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What you are experiencing is the shot-to-shot variability that is a natural consequence of the mechanical linkage between the Nikon camera body and lens. It's why other camera companies (Minolta and Canon) went to an all electronic mount as early as the late 1980s. This same question has been asked and answered before: How can I cancel aperture resetting between subsequent image shots of a timelapse?

Thanks for answering, but I don't understand what is the connection between my analogical lens (ai-s) and the explanation inside your link. I can only use my Nikkor 28mm in manual mode otherwise the camera body doesn't detect it. This doesn't mean I can display the exposimeter and the diaphragm's aperture but I can see the shutter speed. My Nikon d3200 affects the lens in no way because it is independent from the body, in fact it has a metal ring for switching the aperture and once I've done it stayes fixed all the time.
Even if I disconnect the lens nothing happens because I set up my camera in manual mode, I can still continue to take pictures. Simply it's an analogical tool that I mount on the body which doesn't interfere. To know how much the diaphragm's aperture affects the image, I just go in live view and I adjust it accordingly.

So, why do I obtain color variations between some frames sometimes?

  • HI Cristian, welcome to Photo.SE. Please respond to comments with comments of your own, rather than writing an answer to address comments. Answers are meant to address the Question, rather than engage in threaded discussion like you would have in discussion forums. Thanks! =) – scottbb Dec 12 '18 at 18:13
  • This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. - From Review – Viv Dec 12 '18 at 18:34
  • @Viv Sorry, you're right. I didn't find the button for reply before. – Cristian Dec 13 '18 at 16:04

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