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The UK's Guardian newspaper published a photograph of the late minimalist-artist Robert Morris by Grant Delin. The portrait-orientated photograph shows distinctive rectangular-shaped notches at the "top" of each edge of the negative's "vertical" boarders. Can anyone say which camera made this image? All I can discern is that the format is 645.

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    What makes you think the "notches" were made by the camera and not some other part of the process that resulted in this double exposure? It looks to me like two negatives (or possibly the same one exposed twice on the same paper) may have been superimposed on the same print at slightly different enlargement ratios. – Michael C Dec 1 '18 at 15:11
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    That negative appears to be a large format 4x5 or larger, not a medium format 645. Scottbb’s answer shows this clearly with the photos he posted. Those film holders can be used in many different cameras. The row of different shaped notches along the top left of the film are put there by the manufacturer as an identification of the type of film that it is. – Alaska Man Dec 1 '18 at 17:31
  • Agreed, after seeing scotbb's explanation below the image is obviously 4x5, and not 645 as I initially thought, which has a similar ratio. @Micheal Clark: the rebates looked to me like they were caused by the film holder similar to the "double-v" marks made by the old 120 Hasselblad film-backs. – mooie Dec 1 '18 at 18:43
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I don't think you can determine what specific camera left the observed notches, because it's not a feature or property of the camera's construction. Rather, it's a part of the construction of the film holder.

The image you link to is a print of an uncut negative. The notches are simply the part of the film that is left visible by the rails of the film holder.

Here's a Fidelity Elite cut film holder. Notice the notches at the far end of the dark slide:
enter image description here

Here's a Toyo 4x5 film holder, also showing similar notches:
enter image description here

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