5

I recently ordered the Nikon AF FX Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D Lens for my Nikon D3400, but when i try to take a picture, my aperture won’t open at all. I am shooting in manual but it still won’t work. I did buy the lens refurbished, so could there be something wrong with it or am I just doing something wrong?

  • 2
    you can unmount the lens and move the aperture lever by hand to check if it is working. – Horitsu Nov 27 '18 at 5:14
  • well, what are you doing? – osullic Nov 27 '18 at 9:51
  • 5
    What evidence has led you to the conclusion that your aperture is not opening? What did you do and what happened? We can't know if you've done something wrong if you don't tell us what you have done. – J... Nov 27 '18 at 12:59
  • 1
    You say, "my aperture won’t open at all", but to be clear: are you saying you can't change the aperture size? Or do you mean that the shutter won't open when you press the shutter release button? – scottbb Nov 27 '18 at 18:51
18

In order to control the aperture from the D3400 with an older 'D' type lens that has an aperture ring, you need to set the lens' aperture ring to the narrowest (highest f-number) and lock it there. If the aperture ring is in any other position, the camera will not operate the lens' aperture properly.

Keep in mind that there are a few other considerations with using an AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D on a D3400 body:

The big one is autofocus. Your D3400 does not have an autofocus motor in the body to drive Nikon 'AF' lenses, which have no focus motor in the lens, but only a mechanical screw drive connection that can be driven by a Nikon body with an in-body AF motor. To use autofocus with a D3400, you need lenses with AF motors in the lens, such as AF-S, AF-I, and AF-P lenses. Some D series lenses are "AF-S", but many more D series lenses are "AF" lenses with no AF motor in the lens. Even if you had a body with a built-in focus motor that can focus the D series AF lenses, the in-lens AF motors of AF-S lenses are usually faster and almost always quieter than a lens that has to be driven by the body's AF motor.

Comparable AF-S lenses are newer designs than their AF series counterparts when looking at the same focal lengths and maximum apertures. They usually have improved optical designs with more low dispersion and aspherical elements that help fight issues such as chromatic aberration and distortion and almost always have better lens coatings that reduce things such as flare and more rounded apertures that give better bokeh when used at wide apertures.

The AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G is a lens with an AF motor in the lens and a newer optical design when compared to the AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D.

-3

I have a defect lens with a similar problem. It does not open the aperture more than f5 even though it is specified with a maximum aperture of f3.5.

The cause (in my case) is most likely a broken ribbon cable (more precise: a flexible PCB) inside the lens, which transmits data from and to the lens. Along with that problem comes the fact, that some information like the used focal length is not transmitted to the camera body. You have a prime lens, so you have always a constant focal length, but you could check your EXIF data anyway to see, if you find something odd there.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.