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I'm new to this field, today only i got my first dslr. I don't know whether i should leave my sd card and battery as such after turning off my camera everytime or not.

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    Entirely anecdotally - I never remove either, other than to swap. I sometimes don't even switch off the camera, as it will nod off if left alone for a few minutes. I've never noticed any ill-effects. – Tetsujin Nov 3 '18 at 13:31
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The only reason for removing a rechargeable Li-Ion battery would be to prevent it from being totally drained. A totally empty Li-Ion battery can not be recharged by most chargers. This is due to the increased risk of fire when applying voltage to such batteries. In most cases, it should take weeks for a battery to be drained that low. So there is no need to remove the battery each time you are done with the camera. If you store the camera for extended periods then it is a good idea to remove the battery and charge it periodically to prevent it from going completely dead.

If your camera uses a different type of battery than the typical Li-Ion type found in most current cameras, then you would need to consider the battery type.

  • Alkaline and older style Carbon ("Heavy Duty") batteries should be removed if you're not going to use the camera for more than a week or so. Leaving them in for long periods can lead to corrosion leaking from the batteries and getting into your camera. Leaving them in also discharges them slowly as the camera draws minimal amount of power to maintain the time/date clock and other information stored in volatile memory.
  • Older rechargeable batteries, such as NiCd and NiMH batteries, are similar to alkaline batteries. Long term storage can lead to total discharge and leaking of corrosive materials.

On the other hand, there are reasons for leaving batteries in the camera when it will not be left unused for extended periods. Most cameras have a small capacitor on the main board that powers the clock while batteries are being swapped. These capacitors are charged when a battery is installed in the camera and discharge to power the internal clock when a battery is not present. After several days, the capacitor will be exhausted and the time and date will need to be reset when a battery is next installed in the camera. Other information, such as the next available file number or current folder number may also be lost when the internal capacitor can no longer power the internal volatile memory.

As far as SD or other types of memory cards are concerned, there's no need to remove them when storing the camera.

  • Thank you for your response!! My camera comes with the rechargeable Li-Ion battery. As you said, I need not to worry about them unless I leave them unused for a long time. – Ivan Nov 3 '18 at 17:21
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I'd say there is no need to do that, and I cannot imagine that anyone does it. The SD card cannot cause a problem. Alkaline batteries can leak and corrode, and certainly should be observed now and then, but I doubt there is any evidence of today's NiMH or lithium batteries leaking.

If putting the camera away for long time storage, it's a good idea to remove the batteries, but no need for week to week occasional use. Except keep an eye on any alkaline batteries.

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    Thank you for your response !! Yes, the camera comes with Rechargeable Li-Ion battery, so I hope there won't be any problem until I leave it for a long time. – Ivan Nov 3 '18 at 17:30

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