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I think that with 50mm I will be forced to shoot at minimum f8 to keep everything visible, and will have to move back to include everything in the scene.

Is there anything else that will stop me from taking the photos which look like these:

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What would I have to do to take such photos from a 50mm lens of a Dx camera?

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    This linked answer isn't a direct answer to your question, but it does show the difference if you use a longer or shorter lens & how that changes the framing & 'how much background is in frame too'. You could do some quick tests comparing your camera & 50mm lens with your mobile phone's camera. The phone will have something approaching that kind of apparent lens length, & is cheaper than renting an 11mm to test. – Tetsujin Sep 21 '18 at 6:45
  • are you talking about a real 50mm lens or something that is equivalent to a full frame 50mm (35mm on a DX * crop factor 1.5 equals 52mm on full frame). IHMO real 50 mm on a DX or APS-C cam are quite long anyway. The first pic is a good example why it wouldn't work, because you could not even step as far back as necessary to get all what you see there on your foto. – jps Sep 21 '18 at 7:24
  • @jps real 50mm on a D3100. – Aquarius_Girl Sep 21 '18 at 7:29
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What would I have to do to take such photos from a 50mm lens of a Dx camera?

You can't take those pictures with a 50mm lens and a DX (1.5X APS-C) camera.

To fit all of what an 11mm lens will give you you'd have to back up five times as far. But that would change the perspective, or distance relationships between the various parts of the scene. To get those photos you must have the camera in the same position and a lens than can shoot that wide. There's no other way to do it in a single shot.

The closest alternative using a 50mm lens would be to put the camera on a panoramic head that rotates the camera around the optical center of the lens, take a grid of overlapping frames (going both left to right and up to down) until all of the scene is included and then stitch them together after the fact.

The only thing you can replicate more or less exactly with the same camera and a different focal length lens by changing your shooting distance is a perfectly flat target that is perpendicular to the optical axis of the lens. For everything else, the change in perspective will change the way the various parts of the scene look compared to the other parts of the scene.

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