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What available ways are there to output a live feed from the Sony DSC HX60 camera showing what is on its display? For example, can this be done using a cable from the HDMI port on the camera to an HDMI-to-USB dongle in one of the laptop's USB ports, or to an HDMI-to-eSATA dongle in its eSATA port, or perhaps to something that goes into its ExpressCard slot? (The laptop has both HDMI and VGA ports, but as far as I know they are both output only.) Ideally I would like to be able to shoot stills and video with the camera while viewing on the laptop what's on the camera's display, but I don't need to control any of the camera's functions from the laptop.

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To solve this problem there are multiple ways to do it. The first and probably the easiest is to use a USB capture card like this and then record it on the computer with a software but I don't know if this also shows the HUD of the camera (and if you want this). This method has the advantage that you can use your camera normally like you would do without the cable.

Another way to do this is to use software which detects your camera as a webcam. An example for this can be found here. This method only has the problem that the camera here is in PC mode and your usage from the camera side is limited to be controlled only by software on the PC.

The HDMI and VGA ports on your laptop are only the output from your graphics card.

Another option how to do this is show and explained in this YouTube video

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Many thanks for these suggestions. I'm not sure that Elgato's Cam Link works with this camera. The camera is not on their list, but their list may not be comprehensive so I've asked them. Sparkocam say their program works with Canon and Nikon DSLRs. I tried it with my Sony and it doesn't work. Am currently trying OBS Virtual Cam. Last, the Ninja Flame is very expensive! \$\endgroup\$
    – user77703
    Sep 17, 2018 at 18:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ The elegato cam link is just a capture card which captures anything that comes in its hdmi input. So it does not matter if your camera is in their list as long as the camera uses a default hdmi output(to test this just connect it to a screen With a normal hdmi cable. You could also connect a game console or another computer to it if you like. So this should not be the problem \$\endgroup\$
    – LuZel
    Sep 18, 2018 at 6:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't know if this also works for your camera and if you can use your screen at the same time as showing it on the computer but you could also try qDslrDashboard. its a free software available as app, pc and mac and its mostly used for remote control but worth a shot: dslrdashboard.info/introduction \$\endgroup\$
    – LuZel
    Sep 18, 2018 at 6:39
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A web search for "clean HDMI" puts up this link which appears to demonstrate that you not only can get live HDMI output of the camera control display but can also get a clean webcam-suitable display without camera controls in it.

For getting that info into your computer, you'll need a HDMI-to-USB converter. One possibility is a cheap USB2.0 grabber built around the Macrosilicon MS2109 ASIC. Those do either reasonable framerates (30fps I think) with MJPEG compression or uncompressed at low frame rates (something like 5fps). They are sold as USB2.0 metal sticks and "USB3.0" plastic with short cable whip.

The plastic version has a blue USB connector and "USB3.0" in its identification string but it not in any respect USB3.0. It also has worse heat dispersal and so should be avoided.

While they take FullHD, their output may (or may not, this does not seem quite conclusive) be constrained to data interpolated from 1280 pixels horizontally.

If you want better image quality, grabbers intended for game capture tend to provide that. I'd pick only those obeying the UVC standard: they don't depend on drivers provided by the manufacturer.

As an example, Avermedia Live Gamer Portable 2 plus is only USB2.0 but can do x204 capture via UVC and alternatively allows recording an MP4 stream directly to microSD card: that can be rather convenient for avoiding problems with overloaded CPUs of your work computer when preparing material that is not immediately broadcast live.

If your workstation has plenty of power to spare, an actual USB3.0 grabber providing raw HDMI data may be the most flexible choice for further processing or live streaming. Those that don't just fake USB3.0 capability are not necessarily cheap.

But for just goofing around, the cheap MS2109 based sticks are pretty usable.

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