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Nikon D7200. Godox V860IIN.

I am looking for the best camera settings for Wedding And Night Club Photography.

I want to capture images the way it is in my mind with the least amount of adjustments on the camera.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Michael C, xiota, inkista, mattdm, Hueco Aug 21 '18 at 20:22

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    The way it is in your mind? :) Nobody here can read your mind – osullic Aug 18 '18 at 20:40
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    ...but they’ll have a better idea after they see my shot. :D – Ares Aug 18 '18 at 22:38
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What is your favorite camera setting for fast changing light conditions?

Simple: Manual.

When using TTL, the camera will tell the flash how much to fire to bring the exposure up to par. So, in manual, I can just look at the meter and decide very quickly if I want fill flash or a full flash exposure, or anything in between. I find it quicker and easier to bump shutter speed or aperture values using this technique.

If I were in aperture priority mode (my second favorite mode), then I'd have to adjust exposure compensation instead to get the appropriate level of flash for what I want. I find this to be a bit more problematic as the shutter speed that's locked in gets locked in right at the moment of shooting. I also find Av Priority to be hit or miss at weddings, where the meter is often fooled by the high contrast dress code of the bride and groom.

As a side note, I usually use Av without flash and just pay attention to where I let the camera meter before using the exposure lock button before a final composition and shoot.

But with flash, it's manual all the way.

least amount of adjustments necessary

Shooting a wedding requires that your adjustments become second nature. If they're not, then you need more practice until this is no longer a concern. Knowing your camera, learning it and the scene, and learning your flash to a degree where you no longer even have to think about it is required before you even step foot into the venue.

High contrast scenes, poor lighting, and mixed lighting are the areas that'll throw auto-exposure modes for a real loop. These are also what you get to work with while at a wedding.

  • My favourite so far is Manual with Auto ISO, Exposure Compensation for the background, and Flash with Rear Curtain Sync. – Ares Aug 18 '18 at 22:34
  • I'm a little confused here — are you using "manual all the way", or TTL (automatic) flash? If the later, how do you cope with the stated problem of the meter being confused by high-contrast dress? – mattdm Aug 19 '18 at 12:12
  • TTL Flash on the Hot Shoe with White Balance set to Flash. I check the LCD after the shot. If I need to do more adjustments, I use the front sub-dial command with the ISO button to turn off Auto ISO and go full Manual. – Ares Aug 19 '18 at 13:32
  • TTL Flash on the Hot Shoe with White Balance set to Flash. I check the LCD after the shot.. Usually, I’ll adjust the Exposure Compensation, then Flash Compensation. If I need to do more adjustments, I use the front sub-dial command with the ISO button to turn off Auto ISO and go full Manual. – Ares Aug 19 '18 at 13:48
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Which settings work best for one photographer may or may not be the settings that work for another photographer shooting the same event.

Why is this so?

Because even though both photographers are shooting the same event, they may not have the same idea about how they want the images they create at that event to ultimately look.

For a clear example of this, please see another question here: First time - Night Club Photography - what gear do I need?

The various answers differ significantly on several points because the each of the authors of the various answers have a different idea about how they want to the finished images to look. Even though the question starts out from the point of gear, the answers concentrate shooting technique because that is what ultimately determines how an image looks.

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