2 slight grammar correction
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What you are describing is shutter lag. When you press the shutter release, the camera must focus before exposing the image. There are many ways of avoiding this. The easiest is to half-press the shutter so that the camera focuses, then press fully down when you want to take the image. Because the half-press will focus, there is less or no lag when you fully press the shutter release.

Another method is using back-button focus. Here you set up the camera to focus using a button on the back of the camera, and the shutter release is set up to take an image whether or not the subject is in focus or not.

If your subject is moving quickly, then you could switch the focus to AF-C mode. This will track the subject as it moves and you should have little lag when you press the shutter. Again you'll probably need to half-press the shutter for the autofocus system to start tracking. This is for a D5500, but may apply to the D3300: How do I select AF-C on a Nikon D5500?

What you are describing is shutter lag. When you press the shutter release, the camera must focus before exposing the image. There are many ways of avoiding this. The easiest is to half-press the shutter so that the camera focuses, then press fully down when you want to take the image. Because the half-press will focus, there is less or no lag when you fully press the shutter release.

Another method is using back-button focus. Here you set up the camera to focus using a button on the back of the camera, and the shutter release is set up to take an image whether or the subject is in focus or not.

If your subject is moving quickly, then you could switch the focus to AF-C mode. This will track the subject as it moves and you should have little lag when you press the shutter. Again you'll probably need to half-press the shutter for the autofocus system to start tracking. This is for a D5500, but may apply to the D3300: How do I select AF-C on a Nikon D5500?

What you are describing is shutter lag. When you press the shutter release, the camera must focus before exposing the image. There are many ways of avoiding this. The easiest is to half-press the shutter so that the camera focuses, then press fully down when you want to take the image. Because the half-press will focus, there is less or no lag when you fully press the shutter release.

Another method is using back-button focus. Here you set up the camera to focus using a button on the back of the camera, and the shutter release is set up to take an image whether or not the subject is in focus.

If your subject is moving quickly, then you could switch the focus to AF-C mode. This will track the subject as it moves and you should have little lag when you press the shutter. Again you'll probably need to half-press the shutter for the autofocus system to start tracking. This is for a D5500, but may apply to the D3300: How do I select AF-C on a Nikon D5500?

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What you are describing is shutter lag. When you press the shutter release, the camera must focus before exposing the image. There are many ways of avoiding this. The easiest is to half-press the shutter so that the camera focuses, then press fully down when you want to take the image. Because the half-press will focus, there is less or no lag when you fully press the shutter release.

Another method is using back-button focus. Here you set up the camera to focus using a button on the back of the camera, and the shutter release is set up to take an image whether or the subject is in focus or not.

If your subject is moving quickly, then you could switch the focus to AF-C mode. This will track the subject as it moves and you should have little lag when you press the shutter. Again you'll probably need to half-press the shutter for the autofocus system to start tracking. This is for a D5500, but may apply to the D3300: How do I select AF-C on a Nikon D5500?