2 Corrected a typo
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In a word, no: you do not need experience of using film to be a professional photographer, part-time or otherwise. The only considerations a client will care about are: that you produce images they like and that fulfils their brief, and that you do so on time and within budget. As a freelancer, how you achieve those things is generally up to you.

These days, it'd be exceptionally unusual, peculiar even, for a client to insist on you using film. It's never happened to me and I started out professionally when film was still the predominate medium. If it were to happen, you can always politely decline the job, or, better still, recommend someone you know who does work with film. But, I bet you, it'll never be an issue.

That said — and, as others have pointed out — thethere are advantages in knowing how to use film. I know a number of young professionals who are schooling themselves in analogue processes. None of them are using film on a day-to-day basis for paid work, but they are exploring film when working on personal projects and when awarded residencies and the like. And, there is a market for the work they are producing. For example, the ingenious Kazuma Obara won a first prize in the People category of the WorldWorld Press Photo competition in 2016 with his experiments using unexposed film he found in Pripyat.

So, whilst film experience isn't a must, it could be advantageous. But, if you're serious about earning a living from photography then there are other things that are initially more important: making sure you can deliver what you promise in all likely conditions is one, and ensuring you have the appropriate business and marketing skills to run a small commercial enterprise is a close second.

In a word, no: you do not need experience of using film to be a professional photographer, part-time or otherwise. The only considerations a client will care about are: that you produce images they like and that fulfils their brief, and that you do so on time and within budget. As a freelancer, how you achieve those things is generally up to you.

These days, it'd be exceptionally unusual, peculiar even, for a client to insist on you using film. It's never happened to me and I started out professionally when film was still the predominate medium. If it were to happen, you can always politely decline the job, or, better still, recommend someone you know who does work with film. But, I bet you, it'll never be an issue.

That said — and, as others have pointed out — the are advantages in knowing how to use film. I know a number of young professionals who are schooling themselves in analogue processes. None of them are using film on a day-to-day basis for paid work, but they are exploring film when working on personal projects and when awarded residencies and the like. And, there is a market for the work they are producing. For example, the ingenious Kazuma Obara won a first prize in the People category of the World Press Photo competition in 2016 with his experiments using unexposed film he found in Pripyat.

So, whilst film experience isn't a must, it could be advantageous. But, if you're serious about earning a living from photography then there are other things that are initially more important: making sure you can deliver what you promise in all likely conditions is one, and ensuring you have the appropriate business and marketing skills to run a small commercial enterprise is a close second.

In a word, no: you do not need experience of using film to be a professional photographer, part-time or otherwise. The only considerations a client will care about are: that you produce images they like and that fulfils their brief, and that you do so on time and within budget. As a freelancer, how you achieve those things is generally up to you.

These days, it'd be exceptionally unusual, peculiar even, for a client to insist on you using film. It's never happened to me and I started out professionally when film was still the predominate medium. If it were to happen, you can always politely decline the job, or, better still, recommend someone you know who does work with film. But, I bet you, it'll never be an issue.

That said — and, as others have pointed out — there are advantages in knowing how to use film. I know a number of young professionals who are schooling themselves in analogue processes. None of them are using film on a day-to-day basis for paid work, but they are exploring film when working on personal projects and when awarded residencies and the like. And, there is a market for the work they are producing. For example, the ingenious Kazuma Obara won a first prize in the People category of the World Press Photo competition in 2016 with his experiments using unexposed film he found in Pripyat.

So, whilst film experience isn't a must, it could be advantageous. But, if you're serious about earning a living from photography then there are other things that are initially more important: making sure you can deliver what you promise in all likely conditions is one, and ensuring you have the appropriate business and marketing skills to run a small commercial enterprise is a close second.

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source | link

In a word, no: you do not need experience of using film to be a professional photographer, part-time or otherwise. The only considerations a client will care about are: that you produce images they like and that fulfils their brief, and that you do so on time and within budget. As a freelancer, how you achieve those things is generally up to you.

These days, it'd be exceptionally unusual, peculiar even, for a client to insist on you using film. It's never happened to me and I started out professionally when film was still the predominate medium. If it were to happen, you can always politely decline the job, or, better still, recommend someone you know who does work with film. But, I bet you, it'll never be an issue.

That said — and, as others have pointed out — the are advantages in knowing how to use film. I know a number of young professionals who are schooling themselves in analogue processes. None of them are using film on a day-to-day basis for paid work, but they are exploring film when working on personal projects and when awarded residencies and the like. And, there is a market for the work they are producing. For example, the ingenious Kazuma Obara won a first prize in the People category of the World Press Photo competition in 2016 with his experiments using unexposed film he found in Pripyat.

So, whilst film experience isn't a must, it could be advantageous. But, if you're serious about earning a living from photography then there are other things that are initially more important: making sure you can deliver what you promise in all likely conditions is one, and ensuring you have the appropriate business and marketing skills to run a small commercial enterprise is a close second.