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I've worked with both Helicon focus and the two-part combination of a Stackshot rail paired with ZereneStacker.

I prefer Stackshot and Zerene. Once all the various parts are wired together properly (takes some effort to figure it all out) I fire up:

1) entangle tethered directly to the camera and 2) Zerene Stacker, which has a GUI interface for controlling the rail--all of which I have mounted on a tripod in front of a light tent.

Lighting is a big issue too. I won't attempt that discussion now. Use trial and error to determine the ideal manual exposure. My Nikor 105mm macro lens seems to like F8 best.

Determine closest focus point and the furthest. Click the mouse appropriately to tell Zerene where those points are. Fire away. Zerene controls it all from that point on.

Now quit everything. You now have N raw exposures in the stack all exposed and lighted identically. Edit any one raw image from the middle of the stack with rawtherapee. Save a *.pp3 file in the current directory, perhaps named as now.pp3

From a terminal window type: rawtherapee

mkdir tiffs [enter]

rawtherapee-cli -o tiffs -p now.pp3 -t -Y -d -c . [enter]

That performs all the same rawtherapee editing steps, as defined in the pp3 file, to each raw image in the stack, converting to *.tif on the fly. That command also deposits each *.tif file in the tiffs directory made above.

Now run Zerene again on all tifs (ZereneStacker.sh *tif). Align and stack all tifs as per various GUI options.

Now save as a single stacked *.tif, named what ever you like. It's convenient to name stacked tifs as stk-filename.tif

Now run gimp on stk-filename.tif to make the final image.

Helican was full of bugs two years ago when I used it. Perhaps they have it ironed out by now. Helicon electronically twists the focus ring on the lens for each new exposure. Stackshot and Zerene leave the camera settings fixedlens focus ring as is and physically movemoves the camera instead.

Zerene/Stackshot works best for me. Helicon may be better suited to larger subjects while Stackshot/Zerene is better suited to the smallest subjects.

https://www.photomacrography.net/ is a great source of information. With access to experts.

I've worked with both Helicon focus and the two-part combination of a Stackshot rail paired with ZereneStacker.

I prefer Stackshot and Zerene. Once all the various parts are wired together properly (takes some effort to figure it all out) I fire up:

1) entangle tethered directly to the camera and 2) Zerene Stacker, which has a GUI interface for controlling the rail--all of which I have mounted on a tripod in front of a light tent.

Lighting is a big issue too. I won't attempt that discussion now. Use trial and error to determine the ideal manual exposure. My Nikor 105mm macro lens seems to like F8 best.

Determine closest focus point and the furthest. Click the mouse appropriately to tell Zerene where those points are. Fire away. Zerene controls it all from that point on.

Now quit everything. You now have N raw exposures in the stack all exposed and lighted identically. Edit any one raw image from the middle of the stack with rawtherapee. Save a *.pp3 file in the current directory, perhaps named as now.pp3

From a terminal window type: rawtherapee-cli -o tiffs -p now.pp3 -t -Y -d -c .

That performs all the same editing steps, as defined in the pp3 file, to each raw image, converting to *.tif on the fly.

Now run Zerene again on all tifs (ZereneStacker.sh *tif). Align and stack all tifs as per various GUI options.

Now save as a single stacked *.tif, named what ever you like. It's convenient to name stacked tifs as stk-filename.tif

Now run gimp on stk-filename.tif to make the final image.

Helican was full of bugs two years ago when I used it. Perhaps they have it ironed out by now. Helicon electronically twists the focus ring on the lens for each new exposure. Stackshot and Zerene leave the camera settings fixed and physically move the camera instead.

Zerene/Stackshot works best for me. Helicon may be better suited to larger subjects while Stackshot/Zerene is better suited to the smallest.

https://www.photomacrography.net/ is a great source of information. With access to experts.

I've worked with both Helicon focus and the two-part combination of a Stackshot rail paired with ZereneStacker.

I prefer Stackshot and Zerene. Once all the various parts are wired together properly (takes some effort to figure it all out) I fire up:

1) entangle tethered directly to the camera and 2) Zerene Stacker, which has a GUI interface for controlling the rail--all of which I have mounted on a tripod in front of a light tent.

Lighting is a big issue too. I won't attempt that discussion now. Use trial and error to determine the ideal manual exposure. My Nikor 105mm macro lens seems to like F8 best.

Determine closest focus point and the furthest. Click the mouse appropriately to tell Zerene where those points are. Fire away. Zerene controls it all from that point on.

Now quit everything. You now have N raw exposures in the stack all exposed and lighted identically. Edit any one raw image from the middle of the stack with rawtherapee. Save a *.pp3 file in the current directory, perhaps named as now.pp3

From a terminal window type:

mkdir tiffs [enter]

rawtherapee-cli -o tiffs -p now.pp3 -t -Y -d -c . [enter]

That performs the same rawtherapee editing steps, as defined in the pp3 file, to each raw image in the stack, converting to *.tif on the fly. That command also deposits each *.tif file in the tiffs directory made above.

Now run Zerene again on all tifs (ZereneStacker.sh *tif). Align and stack all tifs as per various GUI options.

Now save as a single stacked *.tif, named what ever you like. It's convenient to name stacked tifs as stk-filename.tif

Now run gimp on stk-filename.tif to make the final image.

Helican was full of bugs two years ago when I used it. Perhaps they have it ironed out by now. Helicon electronically twists the focus ring on the lens for each new exposure. Stackshot and Zerene leave the lens focus ring as is and physically moves the camera instead.

Zerene/Stackshot works best for me. Helicon may be better suited to larger subjects while Stackshot/Zerene is better suited to the smallest subjects.

https://www.photomacrography.net/ is a great source of information. With access to experts.

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source | link

I've worked with both Helicon focus and the two-part combination of a Stackshot rail paired with ZereneStacker.

I prefer Stackshot and Zerene. Once all the various parts are wired together properly (takes some effort to figure it all out) I fire up:

1) entangle tethered directly to the camera and 2) Zerene Stacker, which has a GUI interface for controlling the rail--all of which I have mounted on a tripod in front of a light tent.

Lighting is a big issue too. I won't attempt that discussion now. Use trial and error to determine the ideal manual exposure. My Nikor 105mm macro lens seems to like F8 best.

Determine closest focus point and the furthest. Click the mouse appropriately to tell Zerene where those points are. Fire away. Zerene controls it all from that point on.

Now quit everything. You now have N raw exposures in the stack all exposed and lighted identically. Edit any one raw image from the middle of the stack with rawtherapee. Save a *.pp3 file in the current directory, perhaps named as now.pp3

From a terminal window type: rawtherapee-cli -o tiffs -p now.pp3 -t -Y -d -c .

That performs all the same editing steps, as defined in the pp3 file, to each raw image, converting to *.tif on the fly.

Now run Zerene again on all tifs (ZereneStacker.sh *tif). Align and stack all tifs as per various GUI options.

SaveNow save as a single stacked *.tif Now, named what ever you like. It's convenient to name stacked tifs as stk-filename.tif

Now run gimp on the stacked tifstk-filename.tif to make the final image.

Helican was full of bugs two years ago when I used it. Perhaps they have it ironed out by now. Helicon electronically twists the focus ring on the lens for each new exposure. Stackshot and Zerene leave the camera settings fixed and physically move the camera instead.

Zerene/Stackshot works best for me. Helicon may be better suited to larger subjects while Stackshot/Zerene is better suited to the smallest.

https://www.photomacrography.net/ is a great source of information. With access to experts.

I've worked with both Helicon focus and the two-part combination of a Stackshot rail paired with ZereneStacker.

I prefer Stackshot and Zerene. Once all the various parts are wired together properly (takes some effort to figure it all out) I fire up:

1) entangle tethered directly to the camera and 2) Zerene Stacker, which has a GUI interface for controlling the rail--all of which I have mounted on a tripod in front of a light tent.

Lighting is a big issue too. I won't attempt that discussion now. Use trial and error to determine the ideal manual exposure. My Nikor 105mm macro lens seems to like F8 best.

Determine closest focus point and the furthest. Click the mouse appropriately to tell Zerene where those points are. Fire away. Zerene controls it all from that point on.

Now quit everything. You now have N exposures in the stack all exposed and lighted identically. Edit any one raw image from the middle of the stack with rawtherapee. Save a *.pp3 file in the current directory, perhaps named as now.pp3

From a terminal window type: rawtherapee-cli -o tiffs -p now.pp3 -t -Y -d -c .

That performs all the same editing steps to each raw image, converting to *.tif on the fly.

Now run Zerene again on all tifs. Align and stack all tifs as per various GUI options.

Save a single stacked *.tif Now run gimp on the stacked tif to make the final image.

Helican was full of bugs two years ago when I used it. Perhaps they have it ironed out by now. Helicon electronically twists the focus ring for each new exposure. Stackshot and Zerene leave the camera settings fixed and physically move the camera instead.

Zerene/Stackshot works best for me. Helicon may be better suited to larger subjects while Stackshot/Zerene is better suited to the smallest.

https://www.photomacrography.net/ is a great source of information. With access to experts.

I've worked with both Helicon focus and the two-part combination of a Stackshot rail paired with ZereneStacker.

I prefer Stackshot and Zerene. Once all the various parts are wired together properly (takes some effort to figure it all out) I fire up:

1) entangle tethered directly to the camera and 2) Zerene Stacker, which has a GUI interface for controlling the rail--all of which I have mounted on a tripod in front of a light tent.

Lighting is a big issue too. I won't attempt that discussion now. Use trial and error to determine the ideal manual exposure. My Nikor 105mm macro lens seems to like F8 best.

Determine closest focus point and the furthest. Click the mouse appropriately to tell Zerene where those points are. Fire away. Zerene controls it all from that point on.

Now quit everything. You now have N raw exposures in the stack all exposed and lighted identically. Edit any one raw image from the middle of the stack with rawtherapee. Save a *.pp3 file in the current directory, perhaps named as now.pp3

From a terminal window type: rawtherapee-cli -o tiffs -p now.pp3 -t -Y -d -c .

That performs all the same editing steps, as defined in the pp3 file, to each raw image, converting to *.tif on the fly.

Now run Zerene again on all tifs (ZereneStacker.sh *tif). Align and stack all tifs as per various GUI options.

Now save as a single stacked *.tif, named what ever you like. It's convenient to name stacked tifs as stk-filename.tif

Now run gimp on stk-filename.tif to make the final image.

Helican was full of bugs two years ago when I used it. Perhaps they have it ironed out by now. Helicon electronically twists the focus ring on the lens for each new exposure. Stackshot and Zerene leave the camera settings fixed and physically move the camera instead.

Zerene/Stackshot works best for me. Helicon may be better suited to larger subjects while Stackshot/Zerene is better suited to the smallest.

https://www.photomacrography.net/ is a great source of information. With access to experts.

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source | link

I've worked with both Helicon focus and the two-part combination of a Stackshot rail paired with ZereneStacker.

I prefer Stackshot and Zerene. Once all the various parts are wired together properly (takes some effort to figure it all out) I fire up:

1) entangle tethered directly to the camera and 2) Zerene Stacker, which has a GUI interface for controlling the camera and the rail--all of which I have mounted on a tripod in front of a light tent.

Lighting is a big issue too. I won't attempt that discussion now. Use trial and error to determine the ideal manual exposure. My Nikor 105mm macro lens seems to like F8 best.

Determine closest focus point and the furthest. Click the mouse appropriately to tell Zerene where those points are. Fire away. Zerene controls it all from that point on.

Now quit everything. You now have N exposures in the stack all exposed and lighted identically. Edit any one raw image from the middle of the stack with rawtherapee. Save a *.pp3 file in the current directory, perhaps named as now.pp3

From a terminal window type: rawtherapee-cli -o tiffs -p now.pp3 -t -Y -d -c .

That performs all the same editing steps to each raw image, converting to *.tif on the fly.

Now run Zerene again on all tifs. Align and stack all tifs as per various GUI options.

Save a single stacked *.tif Now run gimp on the stacked tif to make the final image.

Helican was full of bugs two years ago when I used it. Perhaps they have it ironed out by now. Helicon electronically twists the focus ring for each new exposure. Stackshot and Zerene leave the camera settings fixed and physically move the camera instead.

Zerene/Stackshot works best for me. Helicon may be better suited to larger subjects while Stackshot/Zerene is better suited to the smallest.

https://www.photomacrography.net/ is a great source of information. With access to experts.

I've worked with both Helicon focus and the two-part combination of a Stackshot rail paired with ZereneStacker.

I prefer Stackshot and Zerene. Once all the various parts are wired together properly (takes some effort to figure it all out) I fire up:

1) entangle tethered directly to the camera and 2) Zerene Stacker, which has a GUI interface for controlling the camera and the rail--all of which I have mounted on a tripod in front of a light tent.

Lighting is a big issue too. I won't attempt that discussion now. Use trial and error to determine the ideal manual exposure. My Nikor 105mm macro lens seems to like F8 best.

Determine closest focus point and the furthest. Click the mouse appropriately to tell Zerene where those points are. Fire away. Zerene controls it all from that point on.

Now quit everything. You now have N exposures in the stack all exposed and lighted identically. Edit any one raw image from the middle of the stack with rawtherapee. Save a *.pp3 file in the current directory, perhaps named as now.pp3

From a terminal window type: rawtherapee-cli -o tiffs -p now.pp3 -t -Y -d -c .

That performs all the same editing steps to each raw image, converting to *.tif on the fly.

Now run Zerene again on all tifs. Align and stack all tifs as per various GUI options.

Save a single stacked *.tif Now run gimp on the stacked tif to make the final image.

Helican was full of bugs two years ago when I used it. Perhaps they have it ironed out by now. Helicon electronically twists the focus ring for each new exposure. Stackshot and Zerene leave the camera settings fixed and physically move the camera instead.

Zerene/Stackshot works best for me. Helicon may be better suited to larger subjects while Stackshot/Zerene is better suited to the smallest.

https://www.photomacrography.net/ is a great source of information. With access to experts.

I've worked with both Helicon focus and the two-part combination of a Stackshot rail paired with ZereneStacker.

I prefer Stackshot and Zerene. Once all the various parts are wired together properly (takes some effort to figure it all out) I fire up:

1) entangle tethered directly to the camera and 2) Zerene Stacker, which has a GUI interface for controlling the rail--all of which I have mounted on a tripod in front of a light tent.

Lighting is a big issue too. I won't attempt that discussion now. Use trial and error to determine the ideal manual exposure. My Nikor 105mm macro lens seems to like F8 best.

Determine closest focus point and the furthest. Click the mouse appropriately to tell Zerene where those points are. Fire away. Zerene controls it all from that point on.

Now quit everything. You now have N exposures in the stack all exposed and lighted identically. Edit any one raw image from the middle of the stack with rawtherapee. Save a *.pp3 file in the current directory, perhaps named as now.pp3

From a terminal window type: rawtherapee-cli -o tiffs -p now.pp3 -t -Y -d -c .

That performs all the same editing steps to each raw image, converting to *.tif on the fly.

Now run Zerene again on all tifs. Align and stack all tifs as per various GUI options.

Save a single stacked *.tif Now run gimp on the stacked tif to make the final image.

Helican was full of bugs two years ago when I used it. Perhaps they have it ironed out by now. Helicon electronically twists the focus ring for each new exposure. Stackshot and Zerene leave the camera settings fixed and physically move the camera instead.

Zerene/Stackshot works best for me. Helicon may be better suited to larger subjects while Stackshot/Zerene is better suited to the smallest.

https://www.photomacrography.net/ is a great source of information. With access to experts.

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