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Take a basic photography course that covers lighting, exposure, and composition. What little you spend on the course for the knowledge you gain will be worth far more in the long run than any gear in your hands when you have no clue how to use it to get the most from that gear. I'm sure there is a community college or something similar nearby that offers such a course at very modest rates for someone who wants to take it without getting college credit (i.e. community adult education outreach or you can just audit the course at a local college that offers basic photography courses). Borrow your aunt's 70D for the course if she will let you. After you've finished the course you will have a much better idea of what gear you need!

Everyone telling you to buy "L" lenses at this point are, in my opinion, a little misguided. "L" lenses are expensive. I own a few of them. But an "L" lens won't allow you to take a better picturetake a better picture until you're good enough that a lesser lens limits what you have the ability to do. And sometimes those more advanced, specialized lenses are harder tools to master.

The EF 85mm f/1.2 L II, for example, is a very specialized lens designed with uncorrected field curvature made for a specific purposespecific purpose. It is totally unsuitable as a general purpose 85mm lens to do landscape photography. A $350 85mm f/1.8 lens will do a better flat field shot than the $1900 85mm f/1.2 L. But it shines like no other lens when you use it to take the kinds of portraits for which it was designed.

If you're serious about doing weddings for profit you will eventually need some very good "L" glass and a couple of full frame cameras as well as some good lighting gear. For weddings you will also need to have a backup for every vital piece of equipment in your bag!

I would advise you to stay away from any form of the 75-300mm lens. It's the worst lens Canon sells and isn't very good, even for a beginner. But most of the other current kit lenses are good enough to learn with and take some very good photos. You'll just bump up against their limits sooner than with much more expensive gear. With a crop body camera you're much better offmuch better off with an EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II or the newer STM version of the 55-250. For your first prime lens the $125 EF 50mm f/1.8 STM is pretty much a no brainer. The recently introduced STM versionSTM version corrects most of the shortcomings of its predecessor, the EF 50mm f/1.8 II that has been around for decades.

I would also say if you're serious about making money with photography the T6s/760D or, to a lesser extent, the T6i/750D would be a much better starter camera than the more limited T6/1300D. The T6s is more like a 70DThe T6s is more like a 70D or other x0D in many ways than it is like the other Rebel/xx0D/xx00D models. Depending on where and when you buy you can get the body with an 18-55 kit lens for not much more than the body alone, so I would recommend the kit for a beginner. The 18-55 will allow you to explore a lot of different types of shots. If you can pick up a kit with the 18-135mm kit lens for not much more that is also an option (and a better lens), but it's usually a considerable jump in expense.

Take a basic photography course that covers lighting, exposure, and composition. What little you spend on the course for the knowledge you gain will be worth far more in the long run than any gear in your hands when you have no clue how to use it to get the most from that gear. I'm sure there is a community college or something similar nearby that offers such a course at very modest rates for someone who wants to take it without getting college credit (i.e. community adult education outreach or you can just audit the course at a local college that offers basic photography courses). Borrow your aunt's 70D for the course if she will let you. After you've finished the course you will have a much better idea of what gear you need!

Everyone telling you to buy "L" lenses at this point are, in my opinion, a little misguided. "L" lenses are expensive. I own a few of them. But an "L" lens won't allow you to take a better picture until you're good enough that a lesser lens limits what you have the ability to do. And sometimes those more advanced, specialized lenses are harder tools to master.

The EF 85mm f/1.2 L II, for example, is a very specialized lens designed with uncorrected field curvature made for a specific purpose. It is totally unsuitable as a general purpose 85mm lens to do landscape photography. A $350 85mm f/1.8 lens will do a better flat field shot than the $1900 85mm f/1.2 L. But it shines like no other lens when you use it to take the kinds of portraits for which it was designed.

If you're serious about doing weddings for profit you will eventually need some very good "L" glass and a couple of full frame cameras as well as some good lighting gear. For weddings you will also need to have a backup for every vital piece of equipment in your bag!

I would advise you to stay away from any form of the 75-300mm lens. It's the worst lens Canon sells and isn't very good, even for a beginner. But most of the other current kit lenses are good enough to learn with and take some very good photos. You'll just bump up against their limits sooner than with much more expensive gear. With a crop body camera you're much better off with an EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II or the newer STM version of the 55-250. For your first prime lens the $125 EF 50mm f/1.8 STM is pretty much a no brainer. The recently introduced STM version corrects most of the shortcomings of its predecessor, the EF 50mm f/1.8 II that has been around for decades.

I would also say if you're serious about making money with photography the T6s/760D or, to a lesser extent, the T6i/750D would be a much better starter camera than the more limited T6/1300D. The T6s is more like a 70D or other x0D in many ways than it is like the other Rebel/xx0D/xx00D models. Depending on where and when you buy you can get the body with an 18-55 kit lens for not much more than the body alone, so I would recommend the kit for a beginner. The 18-55 will allow you to explore a lot of different types of shots. If you can pick up a kit with the 18-135mm kit lens for not much more that is also an option (and a better lens), but it's usually a considerable jump in expense.

Take a basic photography course that covers lighting, exposure, and composition. What little you spend on the course for the knowledge you gain will be worth far more in the long run than any gear in your hands when you have no clue how to use it to get the most from that gear. I'm sure there is a community college or something similar nearby that offers such a course at very modest rates for someone who wants to take it without getting college credit (i.e. community adult education outreach or you can just audit the course at a local college that offers basic photography courses). Borrow your aunt's 70D for the course if she will let you. After you've finished the course you will have a much better idea of what gear you need!

Everyone telling you to buy "L" lenses at this point are, in my opinion, a little misguided. "L" lenses are expensive. I own a few of them. But an "L" lens won't allow you to take a better picture until you're good enough that a lesser lens limits what you have the ability to do. And sometimes those more advanced, specialized lenses are harder tools to master.

The EF 85mm f/1.2 L II, for example, is a very specialized lens designed with uncorrected field curvature made for a specific purpose. It is totally unsuitable as a general purpose 85mm lens to do landscape photography. A $350 85mm f/1.8 lens will do a better flat field shot than the $1900 85mm f/1.2 L. But it shines like no other lens when you use it to take the kinds of portraits for which it was designed.

If you're serious about doing weddings for profit you will eventually need some very good "L" glass and a couple of full frame cameras as well as some good lighting gear. For weddings you will also need to have a backup for every vital piece of equipment in your bag!

I would advise you to stay away from any form of the 75-300mm lens. It's the worst lens Canon sells and isn't very good, even for a beginner. But most of the other current kit lenses are good enough to learn with and take some very good photos. You'll just bump up against their limits sooner than with much more expensive gear. With a crop body camera you're much better off with an EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II or the newer STM version of the 55-250. For your first prime lens the $125 EF 50mm f/1.8 STM is pretty much a no brainer. The recently introduced STM version corrects most of the shortcomings of its predecessor, the EF 50mm f/1.8 II that has been around for decades.

I would also say if you're serious about making money with photography the T6s/760D or, to a lesser extent, the T6i/750D would be a much better starter camera than the more limited T6/1300D. The T6s is more like a 70D or other x0D in many ways than it is like the other Rebel/xx0D/xx00D models. Depending on where and when you buy you can get the body with an 18-55 kit lens for not much more than the body alone, so I would recommend the kit for a beginner. The 18-55 will allow you to explore a lot of different types of shots. If you can pick up a kit with the 18-135mm kit lens for not much more that is also an option (and a better lens), but it's usually a considerable jump in expense.

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Take a basic photography course that covers lighting, exposure, and composition. What little you spend on the course for the knowledge you gain will be worth far more in the long run than any gear in your hands when you have no clue how to use it to get the most from that gear. I'm sure there is a community college or something similar nearby that offers such a course at very modest rates for someone who wants to take it without getting college credit (i.e. community adult education outreach or you can just audit the course at a local college that offers basic photography courses). Borrow your aunt's 70D for the course if she will let you. After you've finished the course you will have a much better idea of what gear you need!

Everyone telling you to buy "L" lenses at this point are, in my opinion, a little misguided. "L" lenses are expensive. I own a few of them. But an "L" lens won't allow you to take a better picture until you're good enough that a lesser lens limits what you have the ability to do. And sometimes those more advanced, specialized lenses are harder tools to master.

The EF 85mm f/1.2 L II, for example, is a very specialized lens designed with uncorrected field curvature made for a specific purpose. It is totally unsuitable as a general purpose 85mm lens to do landscape photography. A $350 85mm f/1.8 lens will do a better flat field shot than the $1900 85mm f/1.2 L. But it shines like no other lens when you use it to take the kinds of portraits for which it was designed.

If you're serious about doing weddings for profit you will eventually need some very good "L" glass and a couple of full frame cameras as well as some good lighting gear. For weddings you will also need to have a backup for every vital piece of equipment in your bag!

I would advise you to stay away from any form of the 75-300mm lens. It's the worst lens Canon sells and isn't very good, even for a beginner. But most of the other current kit lenses are good enough to learn with and take some very good photos. You'll just bump up against their limits sooner than with much more expensive gear. With a crop body camera you're much better off with an EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II or the newer STM version of the 55-250. For your first prime lens the $125 EF 50mm f/1.8 STM is pretty much a no brainer. The recently introduced STM version corrects most of the shortcomings of its predecessor, the EF 50mm f/1.8 II that has been around for decades.

I would also say if you're serious about making money with photography the T6s/760D or, to a lesser extent, the T6i/750D would be a much better starter camera than the more limited T6/1300D. The T6s is more like a 70D or other x0D in many ways than it is like the other Rebel/xx0D/xx00D models. Depending on where and when you buy you can get the body with an 18-55 kit lens for not much more than the body alone, so I would recommend the kit for a beginner as the. The 18-55 will helpallow you to explore a lot of different types of shots. If you can pick up a kit with the 18-135mm kit lens for not much more that is also an option (and a better lens), but it's usually a considerable jump in expense.

Take a basic photography course that covers lighting, exposure, and composition. What little you spend on the course will be worth far more in the long run than any gear in your hands when you have no clue how to use it to get the most from that gear. I'm sure there is a community college or something similar nearby that offers such a course at very modest rates for someone who wants to take it without getting college credit (i.e. community adult education outreach or you can just audit the course at a local college that offers basic photography courses). Borrow your aunt's 70D for the course if she will let you. After you've finished the course you will have a much better idea of what gear you need!

Everyone telling you to buy "L" lenses at this point are, in my opinion, a little misguided. "L" lenses are expensive. I own a few of them. But an "L" lens won't allow you to take a better picture until you're good enough that a lesser lens limits what you have the ability to do. And sometimes those more advanced, specialized lenses are harder tools to master.

The EF 85mm f/1.2 L II, for example, is a very specialized lens designed with uncorrected field curvature made for a specific purpose. It is totally unsuitable as a general purpose 85mm lens to do landscape photography. A $350 85mm f/1.8 lens will do a better flat field shot than the $1900 85mm f/1.2 L. But it shines like no other lens when you use it to take the kinds of portraits for which it was designed.

If you're serious about doing weddings for profit you will eventually need some very good "L" glass and a couple of full frame cameras as well as some good lighting gear. For weddings you will also need to have a backup for every vital piece of equipment in your bag!

I would stay away from any form of the 75-300mm lens. It's the worst lens Canon sells and isn't very good, even for a beginner. But most of the other kit lenses are good enough to learn with and take some very good photos. You'll just bump up against their limits sooner than with much more expensive gear. With a crop body camera you're much better off with an EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II or the newer STM version of the 55-250. For your first prime lens the $125 EF 50mm f/1.8 STM is pretty much a no brainer. The recently introduced STM version corrects most of the shortcomings of its predecessor, the EF 50mm f/1.8 II that has been around for decades.

I would also say if you're serious about making money with photography the T6s/760D or, to a lesser extent, the T6i/750D would be a much better starter camera than the more limited T6/1300D. The T6s is more like a 70D or other x0D in many ways than it is like the other Rebel/xx0D/xx00D models. Depending on where and when you buy you can get the body with an 18-55 kit lens for not much more than the body alone, so I would recommend the kit for a beginner as the 18-55 will help you explore a lot of different types of shots. If you can pick up a kit with the 18-135mm kit lens for not much more that is also an option (and a better lens), but it's usually a considerable jump in expense.

Take a basic photography course that covers lighting, exposure, and composition. What little you spend on the course for the knowledge you gain will be worth far more in the long run than any gear in your hands when you have no clue how to use it to get the most from that gear. I'm sure there is a community college or something similar nearby that offers such a course at very modest rates for someone who wants to take it without getting college credit (i.e. community adult education outreach or you can just audit the course at a local college that offers basic photography courses). Borrow your aunt's 70D for the course if she will let you. After you've finished the course you will have a much better idea of what gear you need!

Everyone telling you to buy "L" lenses at this point are, in my opinion, a little misguided. "L" lenses are expensive. I own a few of them. But an "L" lens won't allow you to take a better picture until you're good enough that a lesser lens limits what you have the ability to do. And sometimes those more advanced, specialized lenses are harder tools to master.

The EF 85mm f/1.2 L II, for example, is a very specialized lens designed with uncorrected field curvature made for a specific purpose. It is totally unsuitable as a general purpose 85mm lens to do landscape photography. A $350 85mm f/1.8 lens will do a better flat field shot than the $1900 85mm f/1.2 L. But it shines like no other lens when you use it to take the kinds of portraits for which it was designed.

If you're serious about doing weddings for profit you will eventually need some very good "L" glass and a couple of full frame cameras as well as some good lighting gear. For weddings you will also need to have a backup for every vital piece of equipment in your bag!

I would advise you to stay away from any form of the 75-300mm lens. It's the worst lens Canon sells and isn't very good, even for a beginner. But most of the other current kit lenses are good enough to learn with and take some very good photos. You'll just bump up against their limits sooner than with much more expensive gear. With a crop body camera you're much better off with an EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II or the newer STM version of the 55-250. For your first prime lens the $125 EF 50mm f/1.8 STM is pretty much a no brainer. The recently introduced STM version corrects most of the shortcomings of its predecessor, the EF 50mm f/1.8 II that has been around for decades.

I would also say if you're serious about making money with photography the T6s/760D or, to a lesser extent, the T6i/750D would be a much better starter camera than the more limited T6/1300D. The T6s is more like a 70D or other x0D in many ways than it is like the other Rebel/xx0D/xx00D models. Depending on where and when you buy you can get the body with an 18-55 kit lens for not much more than the body alone, so I would recommend the kit for a beginner. The 18-55 will allow you to explore a lot of different types of shots. If you can pick up a kit with the 18-135mm kit lens for not much more that is also an option (and a better lens), but it's usually a considerable jump in expense.

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Take a basic photography course that covers lighting, exposure, and composition. What little you spend on the course will be worth far more in the long run than any gear in your hands when you have no clue how to use it to get the most from that gear. I'm sure there is a community college or something similar nearby that offers such a course at very modest rates for someone who wants to take it without getting college credit (i.e. community adult education outreach or you can just audit the course at a local college that offers basic photography courses). Borrow your aunt's 70D for the course if she will let you. After you've finished the course you will have a much better idea of what gear you need!

Everyone telling you to buy "L" lenses at this point are, in my opinion, a little misguided. "L" lenses are expensive. I own a few of them. But an "L" lens won't allow you to take a better picture until you're good enough that a lesser lens limits what you have the ability to do. And sometimes those more advanced, specialized lenses are harder tools to master.

The EF 85mm f/1.2 L II, for example, is a very specialized lens designed with uncorrected field curvature made for a specific purpose. It is totally unsuitable as a general purpose 85mm lens to do landscape photography. A $350 85mm f/1.8 lens will do a better flat field shot than the $1900 85mm f/1.2 L. But it shines like no other lens when you use it to take the kinds of portraits for which it was designed.

If you're serious about doing weddings for profit you will eventually need some very good "L" glass and a couple of full frame cameras as well as some good lighting gear. For weddings you will also need to have a backup for every vital piece of equipment in your bag!

I would stay away from any form of the 75-300mm lens. It's the worst lens Canon sells and isn't very good, even for a beginner. But most of the other kit lenses are good enough to learn with and take some very good photos. You'll just bump up against their limits sooner than with much more expensive gear. With a crop body camera you're much better off with an EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II or the newer STM version of the 55-250. For your first prime lens the $125 EF 50mm f/1.8 STM is pretty much a no brainer. The recently introduced STM version corrects most of the shortcomings of its predecessor, the EF 50mm f/1.8 II that has been around for decades.

I would also say if you're serious about making money with photography the T6s/760D or, to a lesser extent, the T6i/750D would be a much better starter camera than the more limited T6/1300D. The T6s is more like a 70D or other x0D in many ways than it is like the other Rebel/xx0D/xx00D models. Depending on where and when you buy you can get the body with an 18-55 kit lens for not much more than the body alone, so I would recommend the kit for a beginner as the 18-55 will help you explore a lot of different types of shots. If you can pick up a kit with the 18-135mm kit lens for not much more that is also an option (and a better lens), but it's usually a considerable jump in expense.