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If you buy a $2,200 lens expecting it to instantly improve your photographs by a factor of five over your $450 kit lens you're going to be severely disappointed every time. It is the photographer that takes pictures, not lenses. A better lens will only allow a photographer to take a better picture if the photographer's experience and skill level can take advantage of the higher capabilities of the better lens.

Lenses are a lot like other tools: the higher performance ones cost a LOT more compared to the basic ones that can do 80% of what the most expensive ones can do. But when you need (and know how to use) that extra 20% there's usually no other way to get there.

Think of it like putting a new teenage driver in the driver's seat of a Ferrari race car! Will the kid be able to drive faster than in the Toyota they've been learning to drive? Maybe (if they can figure out how to shift the transmission), at least until the first tight corner. But will they be able to control that extra speed enough to make them competitive in a sports car race against professional drivers in the same car? Not a chance.

When moving from a stabilized kit lens to a faster, non-stabilized lens such as the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II you are throwing a couple of new things at yourself at once.

Additionally, in the case of the Canon 7D there is the issue of a fairly strong Anti-Aliasing Filter. In-camera sharpening settings should probably be raised from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3. Bryan Carnathan at The-Digital-Picture even addresses this in his review for the 7D.

Does that mean you can't get Wow images with a 7D? No, it doesn't. It just means you must understand the tool you are using and use it effectively.

Shot with a 7D and EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II set at 200mm, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 1/1600 second. The EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II has been tested to be just a tad sharper than the 70-200 that preceded it as the forerunner of Canon's new f/2.8 zoom lens designs.

7D + EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II

If you decide to pixel peep, however, even the best of images will break down. 100% crop of a section of the same photo:

100% crop

If you buy a $2,200 lens expecting it to instantly improve your photographs by a factor of five over your $450 kit lens you're going to be severely disappointed every time. It is the photographer that takes pictures, not lenses. A better lens will only allow a photographer to take a better picture if the photographer's experience and skill level can take advantage of the higher capabilities of the better lens.

Lenses are a lot like other tools: the higher performance ones cost a LOT more compared to the basic ones that can do 80% of what the most expensive ones can do. But when you need (and know how to use) that extra 20% there's usually no other way to get there.

Think of it like putting a new teenage driver in the driver's seat of a Ferrari race car! Will the kid be able to drive faster than in the Toyota they've been learning to drive? Maybe (if they can figure out how to shift the transmission), at least until the first tight corner. But will they be able to control that extra speed enough to make them competitive in a sports car race against professional drivers in the same car? Not a chance.

When moving from a stabilized kit lens to a faster, non-stabilized lens such as the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II you are throwing a couple of new things at yourself at once.

  • Camera stabilization now rests entirely in your hands. Or better yet, on your tripod's legs. There's no 4-stop IS to compensate for very minor movements of the camera during exposures. You either need to use faster shutter speeds (by a factor of 3 to 4 stops) or stabilize the camera better than you did before just to get the same amount of blur from camera movement that you've been getting in the past. You'll need to go even further than that to see any improvements.
  • Shallower Depth of Field means the margin for focusing errors is much greater at the lens' widest apertures. This means learning the 7D's complex AF system in greater detail. You can start by turning off "Spot AF" that is notoriously inconsistent with the 7D and just use "Single Point" instead. It probably also means doing AFMA calibration in a controlled environment to adjust the camera and lens to each other and account for the manufacturing tolerances of each.

Additionally, in the case of the Canon 7D there is the issue of a fairly strong Anti-Aliasing Filter. In-camera sharpening settings should probably be raised from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3. Bryan Carnathan at The-Digital-Picture even addresses this in his review for the 7D.

Does that mean you can't get Wow images with a 7D? No, it doesn't. It just means you must understand the tool you are using and use it effectively.

Shot with a 7D and EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II set at 200mm, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 1/1600 second. The EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II has been tested to be just a tad sharper than the 70-200 that preceded it as the forerunner of Canon's new f/2.8 zoom lens designs.

7D + EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II

If you decide to pixel peep, however, even the best of images will break down. 100% crop of a section of the same photo:

100% crop

If you buy a $2,200 lens expecting it to instantly improve your photographs by a factor of five over your $450 kit lens you're going to be severely disappointed every time. It is the photographer that takes pictures, not lenses. A better lens will only allow a photographer to take a better picture if the photographer's experience and skill level can take advantage of the higher capabilities of the better lens.

Lenses are a lot like other tools: the higher performance ones cost a LOT more compared to the basic ones that can do 80% of what the most expensive ones can do. But when you need (and know how to use) that extra 20% there's usually no other way to get there.

Think of it like putting a new teenage driver in the driver's seat of a Ferrari race car! Will the kid be able to drive faster than in the Toyota they've been learning to drive? Maybe (if they can figure out how to shift the transmission), at least until the first tight corner. But will they be able to control that extra speed enough to make them competitive in a sports car race against professional drivers in the same car? Not a chance.

When moving from a stabilized kit lens to a faster, non-stabilized lens such as the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II you are throwing a couple of new things at yourself at once.

  • Camera stabilization now rests entirely in your hands. Or better yet, on your tripod's legs. There's no 4-stop IS to compensate for very minor movements of the camera during exposures. You either need to use faster shutter speeds (by a factor of 3 to 4 stops) or stabilize the camera better than you did before just to get the same amount of blur from camera movement that you've been getting in the past. You'll need to go even further than that to see any improvements.
  • Shallower Depth of Field means the margin for focusing errors is much greater at the lens' widest apertures. This means learning the 7D's complex AF system in greater detail. You can start by turning off "Spot AF" that is notoriously inconsistent with the 7D and just use "Single Point" instead. It probably also means doing AFMA calibration in a controlled environment to adjust the camera and lens to each other and account for the manufacturing tolerances of each.

Additionally, in the case of the Canon 7D there is the issue of a fairly strong Anti-Aliasing Filter. In-camera sharpening settings should probably be raised from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3. Bryan Carnathan at The-Digital-Picture even addresses this in his review for the 7D.

Does that mean you can't get Wow images with a 7D? No, it doesn't. It just means you must understand the tool you are using and use it effectively.

Shot with a 7D and EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II set at 200mm, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 1/1600 second. The EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II has been tested to be just a tad sharper than the 70-200 that preceded it as the forerunner of Canon's new f/2.8 zoom lens designs.

7D + EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II

If you decide to pixel peep, however, even the best of images will break down. 100% crop of a section of the same photo:

100% crop

3 added 1 character in body
source | link

If you buy a $1$2,200 lens expecting it to instantly improve your photographs by a factor of sixfive over your $200$450 kit lens you're going to be severely disappointed every time. It is the photographer that takes pictures, not lenses. A better lens will only allow a photographer to take a better picture if the photographer's experience and skill level can take advantage of the higher capabilities of the better lens.

Lenses are a lot like other tools: the higher performance ones cost a LOT more compared to the basic ones that can do 80% of what the most expensive ones can do. But when you need (and know how to use) that extra 20% there's usually no other way to get there.

Think of it like putting a new teenage driver in the driver's seat of a Ferrari race car! Will the kid be able to drive faster than in the Toyota they've been learning to drive? Maybe (if they can figure out how to shift the transmission), at least until the first tight corner. But will they be able to control that extra speed enough to make them competitive in a sports car race against professional drivers in the same car? Not a chance.

When moving from a stabilized kit lens to a faster, non-stabilized lens such as the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II you are throwing a couple of new things at yourself at once.

  • Camera stabilization now rests entirely in your hands. Or better yet, on your tripod's legs. There's no 4-stop IS to compensate for very minor movements of the camera during exposures. You either need to use faster shutter speeds (by a factor of 3 to 4 stops) or stabilize the camera better than you did before just to get the same amount of blur from camera movement that you've been getting in the past. You'll need to go even further than that to see any improvements.
  • Shallower Depth of Field means the margin for focusing errors is much greater at the lens' widest apertures. This means learning the 7D's complex AF system in greater detail. You can start by turning off "Spot AF" that is notoriously inconsistent with the 7D and just use "Single Point" instead. It probably also means doing AFMA calibration in a controlled environment to adjust the camera and lens to each other and account for the manufacturing tolerances of each.

Additionally, in the case of the Canon 7D there is the issue of a fairly strong Anti-Aliasing Filter. In-camera sharpening settings should probably be raised from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3. Bryan Carnathan at The-Digital-Picture even addresses this in his review for the 7D.

Does that mean you can't get Wow images with a 7D? No, it doesn't. It just means you must understand the tool you are using and use it effectively.

Shot with a 7D and EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II set at 200mm, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 1/1600 second. The EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II has been tested to be just a tad sharper than the 70-200 that preceded it as the forerunner of Canon's new f/2.8 zoom lens designs.

7D + EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II

If you decide to pixel peep, however, even the best of images will break down. 100% crop of a section of the same photo:

100% crop

If you buy a $1,200 lens expecting it to instantly improve your photographs by a factor of six over your $200 kit lens you're going to be severely disappointed every time. It is the photographer that takes pictures, not lenses. A better lens will only allow a photographer to take a better picture if the photographer's experience and skill level can take advantage of the higher capabilities of the better lens.

Lenses are a lot like other tools: the higher performance ones cost a LOT more compared to the basic ones that can do 80% of what the most expensive ones can do. But when you need (and know how to use) that extra 20% there's usually no other way to get there.

Think of it like putting a new teenage driver in the driver's seat of a Ferrari race car! Will the kid be able to drive faster than in the Toyota they've been learning to drive? Maybe (if they can figure out how to shift the transmission), at least until the first tight corner. But will they be able to control that extra speed enough to make them competitive in a sports car race against professional drivers in the same car? Not a chance.

When moving from a stabilized kit lens to a faster, non-stabilized lens such as the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II you are throwing a couple of new things at yourself at once.

  • Camera stabilization now rests entirely in your hands. Or better yet, on your tripod's legs. There's no 4-stop IS to compensate for very minor movements of the camera during exposures. You either need to use faster shutter speeds (by a factor of 3 to 4 stops) or stabilize the camera better than you did before just to get the same amount of blur from camera movement that you've been getting in the past. You'll need to go even further than that to see any improvements.
  • Shallower Depth of Field means the margin for focusing errors is much greater at the lens' widest apertures. This means learning the 7D's complex AF system in greater detail. You can start by turning off "Spot AF" that is notoriously inconsistent with the 7D and just use "Single Point" instead. It probably also means doing AFMA calibration in a controlled environment to adjust the camera and lens to each other and account for the manufacturing tolerances of each.

Additionally, in the case of the Canon 7D there is the issue of a fairly strong Anti-Aliasing Filter. In-camera sharpening settings should probably be raised from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3. Bryan Carnathan at The-Digital-Picture even addresses this in his review for the 7D.

Does that mean you can't get Wow images with a 7D? No, it doesn't. It just means you must understand the tool you are using and use it effectively.

Shot with a 7D and EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II set at 200mm, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 1/1600 second. The EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II has been tested to be just a tad sharper than the 70-200 that preceded it as the forerunner of Canon's new f/2.8 zoom lens designs.

7D + EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II

If you decide to pixel peep, however, even the best of images will break down. 100% crop of a section of the same photo:

100% crop

If you buy a $2,200 lens expecting it to instantly improve your photographs by a factor of five over your $450 kit lens you're going to be severely disappointed every time. It is the photographer that takes pictures, not lenses. A better lens will only allow a photographer to take a better picture if the photographer's experience and skill level can take advantage of the higher capabilities of the better lens.

Lenses are a lot like other tools: the higher performance ones cost a LOT more compared to the basic ones that can do 80% of what the most expensive ones can do. But when you need (and know how to use) that extra 20% there's usually no other way to get there.

Think of it like putting a new teenage driver in the driver's seat of a Ferrari race car! Will the kid be able to drive faster than in the Toyota they've been learning to drive? Maybe (if they can figure out how to shift the transmission), at least until the first tight corner. But will they be able to control that extra speed enough to make them competitive in a sports car race against professional drivers in the same car? Not a chance.

When moving from a stabilized kit lens to a faster, non-stabilized lens such as the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II you are throwing a couple of new things at yourself at once.

  • Camera stabilization now rests entirely in your hands. Or better yet, on your tripod's legs. There's no 4-stop IS to compensate for very minor movements of the camera during exposures. You either need to use faster shutter speeds (by a factor of 3 to 4 stops) or stabilize the camera better than you did before just to get the same amount of blur from camera movement that you've been getting in the past. You'll need to go even further than that to see any improvements.
  • Shallower Depth of Field means the margin for focusing errors is much greater at the lens' widest apertures. This means learning the 7D's complex AF system in greater detail. You can start by turning off "Spot AF" that is notoriously inconsistent with the 7D and just use "Single Point" instead. It probably also means doing AFMA calibration in a controlled environment to adjust the camera and lens to each other and account for the manufacturing tolerances of each.

Additionally, in the case of the Canon 7D there is the issue of a fairly strong Anti-Aliasing Filter. In-camera sharpening settings should probably be raised from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3. Bryan Carnathan at The-Digital-Picture even addresses this in his review for the 7D.

Does that mean you can't get Wow images with a 7D? No, it doesn't. It just means you must understand the tool you are using and use it effectively.

Shot with a 7D and EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II set at 200mm, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 1/1600 second. The EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II has been tested to be just a tad sharper than the 70-200 that preceded it as the forerunner of Canon's new f/2.8 zoom lens designs.

7D + EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II

If you decide to pixel peep, however, even the best of images will break down. 100% crop of a section of the same photo:

100% crop

2 added 89 characters in body
source | link

If you buy a $1,200 lens expecting it to instantly improve your photographs by a factor of six over your $200 kit lens you're going to be severely disappointed every time. It is the photographer that takes pictures, not lenses. A better lens will only allow a photographer to take a better picture if the photographer's experience and skill level can take advantage of the higher capabilities of the better lens.

Lenses are a lot like other tools: the higher performance ones cost a LOT more compared to the basic ones that can do 80% of what the most expensive ones can do. But when you need (and know how to use) that extra 20% there's usually no other way to get there.

Think of it like putting a new teenage driver in the driver's seat of a Ferrari race car! Will the kid be able to drive faster than in the Toyota they've been learning to drive? Maybe (if they can figure out how to shift the transmission), at least until the first tight corner. But will they be able to control that extra speed enough to make them competitive in a sports car race against professional drivers in the same car? Not a chance.

When moving from a stabilized kit lens to a faster, non-stabilized lens such as the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II you are throwing a couple of new things at yourself at once.

  • Camera stabilization now rests entirely in your hands. Or better yet, on your tripod's legs. There's no 4-stop IS to compensate for very minor movements of the camera during exposures. You either need to use faster shutter speeds (by a factor of 3 to 4 stops) or stabilize the camera better than you did before just to get the same amount of blur from camera movement that you've been getting in the past. You'll need to go even further than that to see any improvements.
  • Shallower Depth of Field means the margin for focusing errors is much greater at the lens' widest apertures. This means learning the 7D's complex AF system in greater detail. You can start by turning off "Spot AF" that is notoriously inconsistent with the 7D and just use "Single Point" instead. It probably also means doing AFMA calibration in a controlled environment to adjust the camera and lens to each other and account for the manufacturing tolerances of each.

Additionally, in the case of the Canon 7D there is the issue of a fairly strong Anti-Aliasing Filter. In-camera sharpening settings should probably be raised from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3. Bryan Carnathan at The-Digital-Picture even addresses this in his review for the 7D.

Does that mean you can't get Wow images with a 7D? No, it doesn't. It just means you must understand the tool you are using and use it effectively.

Shot with a 7D and EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II set at 200mm, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 1/1600 second. The EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II has been tested to be just a tad sharper than the 70-200 that preceded it as the forerunner of Canon's new f/2.8 zoom lens designs.

7D + EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II

If you decide to pixel peep, however, even the best of images will break down. 100% crop of a section of the same photo:

100% crop

If you buy a $1,200 lens expecting it to instantly improve your photographs by a factor of six over your $200 kit lens you're going to be severely disappointed every time. It is the photographer that takes pictures, not lenses. A better lens will only allow a photographer to take a better picture if the photographer's experience and skill level can take advantage of the higher capabilities of the better lens.

Lenses are a lot like other tools: the higher performance ones cost a LOT more compared to the basic ones that can do 80% of what the most expensive ones can do. But when you need (and know how to use) that extra 20% there's usually no other way to get there.

Think of it like putting a new teenage driver in the driver's seat of a Ferrari race car! Will the kid be able to drive faster? Maybe (if they can figure out how to shift the transmission). But will they be able to control that extra speed enough to make them competitive in a sports car race against professional drivers in the same car? Not a chance.

When moving from a stabilized kit lens to a faster, non-stabilized lens such as the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II you are throwing a couple of new things at yourself at once.

  • Camera stabilization now rests entirely in your hands. Or better yet, on your tripod's legs. There's no 4-stop IS to compensate for very minor movements of the camera during exposures. You either need to use faster shutter speeds (by a factor of 3 to 4 stops) or stabilize the camera better than you did before just to get the same amount of blur from camera movement that you've been getting in the past. You'll need to go even further than that to see any improvements.
  • Shallower Depth of Field means the margin for focusing errors is much greater at the lens' widest apertures. This means learning the 7D's complex AF system in greater detail. You can start by turning off "Spot AF" that is notoriously inconsistent with the 7D and just use "Single Point" instead. It probably also means doing AFMA calibration in a controlled environment to adjust the camera and lens to each other and account for the manufacturing tolerances of each.

Additionally, in the case of the Canon 7D there is the issue of a fairly strong Anti-Aliasing Filter. In-camera sharpening settings should probably be raised from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3. Bryan Carnathan at The-Digital-Picture even addresses this in his review for the 7D.

Does that mean you can't get Wow images with a 7D? No, it doesn't. It just means you must understand the tool you are using and use it effectively.

Shot with a 7D and EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II set at 200mm, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 1/1600 second. The EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II has been tested to be just a tad sharper than the 70-200 that preceded it as the forerunner of Canon's new f/2.8 zoom lens designs.

7D + EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II

If you decide to pixel peep, however, even the best of images will break down. 100% crop of a section of the same photo:

100% crop

If you buy a $1,200 lens expecting it to instantly improve your photographs by a factor of six over your $200 kit lens you're going to be severely disappointed every time. It is the photographer that takes pictures, not lenses. A better lens will only allow a photographer to take a better picture if the photographer's experience and skill level can take advantage of the higher capabilities of the better lens.

Lenses are a lot like other tools: the higher performance ones cost a LOT more compared to the basic ones that can do 80% of what the most expensive ones can do. But when you need (and know how to use) that extra 20% there's usually no other way to get there.

Think of it like putting a new teenage driver in the driver's seat of a Ferrari race car! Will the kid be able to drive faster than in the Toyota they've been learning to drive? Maybe (if they can figure out how to shift the transmission), at least until the first tight corner. But will they be able to control that extra speed enough to make them competitive in a sports car race against professional drivers in the same car? Not a chance.

When moving from a stabilized kit lens to a faster, non-stabilized lens such as the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II you are throwing a couple of new things at yourself at once.

  • Camera stabilization now rests entirely in your hands. Or better yet, on your tripod's legs. There's no 4-stop IS to compensate for very minor movements of the camera during exposures. You either need to use faster shutter speeds (by a factor of 3 to 4 stops) or stabilize the camera better than you did before just to get the same amount of blur from camera movement that you've been getting in the past. You'll need to go even further than that to see any improvements.
  • Shallower Depth of Field means the margin for focusing errors is much greater at the lens' widest apertures. This means learning the 7D's complex AF system in greater detail. You can start by turning off "Spot AF" that is notoriously inconsistent with the 7D and just use "Single Point" instead. It probably also means doing AFMA calibration in a controlled environment to adjust the camera and lens to each other and account for the manufacturing tolerances of each.

Additionally, in the case of the Canon 7D there is the issue of a fairly strong Anti-Aliasing Filter. In-camera sharpening settings should probably be raised from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3. Bryan Carnathan at The-Digital-Picture even addresses this in his review for the 7D.

Does that mean you can't get Wow images with a 7D? No, it doesn't. It just means you must understand the tool you are using and use it effectively.

Shot with a 7D and EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II set at 200mm, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 1/1600 second. The EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II has been tested to be just a tad sharper than the 70-200 that preceded it as the forerunner of Canon's new f/2.8 zoom lens designs.

7D + EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II

If you decide to pixel peep, however, even the best of images will break down. 100% crop of a section of the same photo:

100% crop

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