2 added 15 characters in body
source | link

View cameras are, essentially, two flat panels (normally squarish) with a bag or bellows in between. One panel holds the sensor (or ground glass/film holder) and the other panel holds the lens (which normally doesn't itself have movable elements). The panels can be moved independently, so you could focus by moving the rear panel.

A potential advantage of rear focusing is that for close-in photography keeping the lens fixed also keeps the magnification fixed (otherwise you might end up wanting to move the whole camera to get in focus). [See comments]

See Wikipedia's page on this camera type for pictures: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/View_camera

View cameras are, essentially, two flat panels (normally squarish) with a bag or bellows in between. One panel holds the sensor (or ground glass/film holder) and the other panel holds the lens (which normally doesn't itself have movable elements). The panels can be moved independently, so you could focus by moving the rear panel.

A potential advantage of rear focusing is that for close-in photography keeping the lens fixed also keeps the magnification fixed (otherwise you might end up wanting to move the whole camera to get in focus).

See Wikipedia's page on this camera type for pictures: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/View_camera

View cameras are, essentially, two flat panels (normally squarish) with a bag or bellows in between. One panel holds the sensor (or ground glass/film holder) and the other panel holds the lens (which normally doesn't itself have movable elements). The panels can be moved independently, so you could focus by moving the rear panel.

A potential advantage of rear focusing is that for close-in photography keeping the lens fixed also keeps the magnification fixed (otherwise you might end up wanting to move the whole camera to get in focus). [See comments]

See Wikipedia's page on this camera type for pictures: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/View_camera

1
source | link

View cameras are, essentially, two flat panels (normally squarish) with a bag or bellows in between. One panel holds the sensor (or ground glass/film holder) and the other panel holds the lens (which normally doesn't itself have movable elements). The panels can be moved independently, so you could focus by moving the rear panel.

A potential advantage of rear focusing is that for close-in photography keeping the lens fixed also keeps the magnification fixed (otherwise you might end up wanting to move the whole camera to get in focus).

See Wikipedia's page on this camera type for pictures: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/View_camera