2 replaced http://photo.stackexchange.com/ with https://photo.stackexchange.com/
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Yes, you can correct a little bit; That's what the exposure sliders in Aperture/Photoshop/Lightroom are for, and it's one of the reasons RAW can be a better choice than JPEG.

However, some information is hidden by noise, and you're better off changing ISO in camera to get a proper exposure than underexposing and correcting in post. A 1/100, f/8, ISO 800 picture adjusted +2 stops in post will have more noise than a 1/100, f/8, ISO 3200 picture straight out of camera.

Also see How is ISO implemented in digital cameras?How is ISO implemented in digital cameras? for similar discussion.

Yes, you can correct a little bit; That's what the exposure sliders in Aperture/Photoshop/Lightroom are for, and it's one of the reasons RAW can be a better choice than JPEG.

However, some information is hidden by noise, and you're better off changing ISO in camera to get a proper exposure than underexposing and correcting in post. A 1/100, f/8, ISO 800 picture adjusted +2 stops in post will have more noise than a 1/100, f/8, ISO 3200 picture straight out of camera.

Also see How is ISO implemented in digital cameras? for similar discussion.

Yes, you can correct a little bit; That's what the exposure sliders in Aperture/Photoshop/Lightroom are for, and it's one of the reasons RAW can be a better choice than JPEG.

However, some information is hidden by noise, and you're better off changing ISO in camera to get a proper exposure than underexposing and correcting in post. A 1/100, f/8, ISO 800 picture adjusted +2 stops in post will have more noise than a 1/100, f/8, ISO 3200 picture straight out of camera.

Also see How is ISO implemented in digital cameras? for similar discussion.

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source | link

Yes, you can correct a little bit; That's what the exposure sliders in Aperture/Photoshop/Lightroom are for, and it's one of the reasons RAW can be a better choice than JPEG.

However, some information is hidden by noise, and you're better off changing ISO in camera to get a proper exposure than underexposing and correcting in post. A 1/100, f/8, ISO 800 picture adjusted +2 stops in post will have more noise than a 1/100, f/8, ISO 3200 picture straight out of camera.

Also see How is ISO implemented in digital cameras? for similar discussion.