2 Added information. Minor correction.
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My parents recently bought a semiprofessional camera, a Nikon P100, and I went through a similar experience of learning.

I think the most important thing is to learn about exposure. Basically, you must understand three settings: Film speed, aperture size, shutter speed.

Film speed is a measure of how sensitive to light your film is. On newer cameras, it measures how sensitive the camera's sensor is, and can usually be configured on the fly. It is commonly referred to as "ISO."

High sensitivity means relatively less light is needed to register a picture.

Aperture is the opening through which light passes. The aperture size regulates how much light is allowed through. It is usually specified as f-numbers. Lower f-numbers denote bigger openings.

Aperture also influences the depth of field, which is the area of the scene which will appear sharp on the photo.

Finally, shutter speed controls how long your camera's shutter stays open. Smaller values are faster.

Slower shutter speeds mean the shutter stays open for a longer time, allowing more light to reach the film or sensor. This can produce very interesting photos.

Faster shutter speeds mean the shutter stays open for less time, which means less light will be registered by the film or sensor. You should adjust your aperture or ISO accordingly.

Once you understand all that, you should learn about composition. Start with the rule of thirds.

By the way, you should practice with a digital camera so that you can see the results of your experiments immediately.

My parents recently bought a semiprofessional camera, a Nikon P100, and I went through a similar experience of learning.

I think the most important thing is to learn about exposure. Basically, you must understand three settings: Film speed, aperture size, shutter speed.

Film speed is a measure of how sensitive to light your film is. On newer cameras, it measures how sensitive the camera's sensor is, and can usually be configured on the fly. It is commonly referred to as "ISO."

High sensitivity means relatively less light is needed to register a picture.

Aperture is the opening through which light passes. The aperture size regulates how much light is allowed through. It is usually specified as f-numbers. Lower f-numbers denote bigger openings.

Finally, shutter speed controls how long your camera's shutter stays open. Smaller values are faster.

Slower shutter speeds mean the shutter stays open for a longer time, allowing more light to reach the film or sensor. This can produce very interesting photos.

Faster shutter speeds mean the shutter stays open for less time, which means less light will be registered by the film or sensor. You should adjust your aperture or ISO accordingly.

Once you understand all that, you should learn about composition. Start with the rule of thirds.

By the way, you should practice with a digital camera so that you can see the results of your experiments immediately.

My parents recently bought a Nikon P100, and I went through a similar experience of learning.

I think the most important thing is to learn about exposure. Basically, you must understand three settings: Film speed, aperture size, shutter speed.

Film speed is a measure of how sensitive to light your film is. On newer cameras, it measures how sensitive the camera's sensor is, and can usually be configured on the fly. It is commonly referred to as "ISO."

High sensitivity means relatively less light is needed to register a picture.

Aperture is the opening through which light passes. The aperture size regulates how much light is allowed through. It is usually specified as f-numbers. Lower f-numbers denote bigger openings.

Aperture also influences the depth of field, which is the area of the scene which will appear sharp on the photo.

Finally, shutter speed controls how long your camera's shutter stays open. Smaller values are faster.

Slower shutter speeds mean the shutter stays open for a longer time, allowing more light to reach the film or sensor. This can produce very interesting photos.

Faster shutter speeds mean the shutter stays open for less time, which means less light will be registered by the film or sensor. You should adjust your aperture or ISO accordingly.

Once you understand all that, you should learn about composition. Start with the rule of thirds.

By the way, you should practice with a digital camera so that you can see the results of your experiments immediately.

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source | link

My parents recently bought a semiprofessional camera, a Nikon P100, and I went through a similar experience of learning.

I think the most important thing is to learn about exposure. Basically, you must understand three settings: Film speed, aperture size, shutter speed.

Film speed is a measure of how sensitive to light your film is. On newer cameras, it measures how sensitive the camera's sensor is, and can usually be configured on the fly. It is commonly referred to as "ISO."

High sensitivity means relatively less light is needed to register a picture.

Aperture is the opening through which light passes. The aperture size regulates how much light is allowed through. It is usually specified as f-numbers. Lower f-numbers denote bigger openings.

Finally, shutter speed controls how long your camera's shutter stays open. Smaller values are faster.

Slower shutter speeds mean the shutter stays open for a longer time, allowing more light to reach the film or sensor. This can produce very interesting photos.

Faster shutter speeds mean the shutter stays open for less time, which means less light will be registered by the film or sensor. You should adjust your aperture or ISO accordingly.

Once you understand all that, you should learn about composition. Start with the rule of thirds.

By the way, you should practice with a digital camera so that you can see the results of your experiments immediately.