3 Corrected meaning of shutter speed indication (and avoid potentially confusing "fast" and "slow" terminology)
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I have a D5100 as well and was out taking pictures of the moon last night as well :-) These are the steps I took:

  1. put your camera in manual mode

  2. focus and zoom your camera on the moon

  3. take a test-shot with a baseline configuration (ISO 200, F/8, 1/125s as per Olin's suggestion)

  4. observe the results and adjust accordingly: increasemake the shutter speed (faster)shorter if the moon is too bright, lower make it (slower)longer if it is too dark.

It is also worth noting that the built-in light meter is pretty much useless in this situation. Even with spot metering it didn't work for me.

I have a D5100 as well and was out taking pictures of the moon last night as well :-) These are the steps I took:

  1. put your camera in manual mode

  2. focus and zoom your camera on the moon

  3. take a test-shot with a baseline configuration (ISO 200, F/8, 1/125s as per Olin's suggestion)

  4. observe the results and adjust accordingly: increase the shutter speed (faster) if the moon is too bright, lower it (slower) if it is too dark.

It is also worth noting that the built-in light meter is pretty much useless in this situation. Even with spot metering it didn't work for me.

I have a D5100 as well and was out taking pictures of the moon last night as well :-) These are the steps I took:

  1. put your camera in manual mode

  2. focus and zoom your camera on the moon

  3. take a test-shot with a baseline configuration (ISO 200, F/8, 1/125s as per Olin's suggestion)

  4. observe the results and adjust accordingly: make the shutter speed shorter if the moon is too bright, make it longer if it is too dark.

It is also worth noting that the built-in light meter is pretty much useless in this situation. Even with spot metering it didn't work for me.

2 Corrected meaning of shutter speed indication
source | link

I have a D5100 as well and was out taking pictures of the moon last night as well :-) These are the steps I took:

  1. put your camera in manual mode

  2. focus and zoom your camera on the moon

  3. take a test-shot with a baseline configuration (ISO 200, F/8, 1/125s as per Olin's suggestion)

  4. observe the results and adjust accordingly: slowincrease the shutter speed until(faster) if the moon is not sotoo bright anymore, lower it (slower) if it is too dark.

It is also worth noting that the built-in light meter is pretty much useless in this situation. Even with spot metering it didn't work for me.

I have a D5100 as well and was out taking pictures of the moon last night as well :-) These are the steps I took:

  1. put your camera in manual mode

  2. focus and zoom your camera on the moon

  3. take a test-shot with a baseline configuration (ISO 200, F/8, 1/125s as per Olin's suggestion)

  4. observe the results and adjust accordingly: slow the shutter speed until the moon is not so bright anymore.

It is also worth noting that the built-in light meter is pretty much useless in this situation. Even with spot metering it didn't work for me.

I have a D5100 as well and was out taking pictures of the moon last night as well :-) These are the steps I took:

  1. put your camera in manual mode

  2. focus and zoom your camera on the moon

  3. take a test-shot with a baseline configuration (ISO 200, F/8, 1/125s as per Olin's suggestion)

  4. observe the results and adjust accordingly: increase the shutter speed (faster) if the moon is too bright, lower it (slower) if it is too dark.

It is also worth noting that the built-in light meter is pretty much useless in this situation. Even with spot metering it didn't work for me.

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source | link

I have a D5100 as well and was out taking pictures of the moon last night as well :-) These are the steps I took:

  1. put your camera in manual mode

  2. focus and zoom your camera on the moon

  3. take a test-shot with a baseline configuration (ISO 200, F/8, 1/125s as per Olin's suggestion)

  4. observe the results and adjust accordingly: slow the shutter speed until the moon is not so bright anymore.

It is also worth noting that the built-in light meter is pretty much useless in this situation. Even with spot metering it didn't work for me.