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If you're a canon shooter, I'll second the 7D. I use it for most of my work, and it's great. I've also shot extensively with the 100-400, and Mike's note on it does a good job of explaining why it's a good answer for you.

Having said that, I've retired my 100-400 and I'm now shooting a different set of lenses, and depending on what your kit already looks like, you might want to go in another direction.

My go-to animal/bird lens is now the Canon 300 F4 + 1.4x teleconverter. I use it instead of the 100-400 because it is sharper (@ 400mm) and has faster and more accurate autofocus. The cost of a new 300 F4 + a new 1.4x is about the same as a 100-400 (maybe a bit more), but my experience is I get better images out of it.

Whether you go with the 300+1.4x or the 100-400 depends on the rest of your kit. If you have good lens coverage at 200mm and wider, then I don't think the 100-400 is the right lens for you. I carry the 24-104F4, the 70-200F2.8, and having upgraded my kit to include them, 99% of my shooting on the 100-400 was at 400mm, and in that case, that's not the best lens. If you're just building a kit and you plan on a lens that covers all of your telephoto needs, then the 100-400 may be the better option (the 24-104, 100-400 would be an interesting setup, for instance). Be aware the 100-400 softens above 300mm, but it's a very good lens. the 300F4+1.4x is noticably sharper to me, plus the faster AF helps in moving thing scenarios.

Which way you go depends on the rest of your kit. IMHO, if you need a dedicated wildlife/bird lens, I much prefer the 300+1.4 to the 100-400; if you need a lens that covers a wider range of images and is more of an extended telephoto, the 100-400 is the choice, but with some of the typical tradeoffs of a zoom. But if you have a good lens in the 70-200 range, then the 100-400 is overlapping that in a big way and probably overkill.

Especially since these are all big, heavy lenses that you need to carry around. I definitely did not want a backpack with a 70-200F2.8, 100-400 AND a 300F4. God help me when I upgrade and buy that 500mm, I'll need a forklift. Keep weight and size and luggability in mind when making these decisions, too.

chuq (chuqui.smugmug.com if you want to look at images)

If you're a canon shooter, I'll second the 7D. I use it for most of my work, and it's great. I've also shot extensively with the 100-400, and Mike's note on it does a good job of explaining why it's a good answer for you.

Having said that, I've retired my 100-400 and I'm now shooting a different set of lenses, and depending on what your kit already looks like, you might want to go in another direction.

My go-to animal/bird lens is now the Canon 300 F4 + 1.4x teleconverter. I use it instead of the 100-400 because it is sharper (@ 400mm) and has faster and more accurate autofocus. The cost of a new 300 F4 + a new 1.4x is about the same as a 100-400 (maybe a bit more), but my experience is I get better images out of it.

Whether you go with the 300+1.4x or the 100-400 depends on the rest of your kit. If you have good lens coverage at 200mm and wider, then I don't think the 100-400 is the right lens for you. I carry the 24-104F4, the 70-200F2.8, and having upgraded my kit to include them, 99% of my shooting on the 100-400 was at 400mm, and in that case, that's not the best lens. If you're just building a kit and you plan on a lens that covers all of your telephoto needs, then the 100-400 may be the better option (the 24-104, 100-400 would be an interesting setup, for instance). Be aware the 100-400 softens above 300mm, but it's a very good lens. the 300F4+1.4x is noticably sharper to me, plus the faster AF helps in moving thing scenarios.

Which way you go depends on the rest of your kit. IMHO, if you need a dedicated wildlife/bird lens, I much prefer the 300+1.4 to the 100-400; if you need a lens that covers a wider range of images and is more of an extended telephoto, the 100-400 is the choice, but with some of the typical tradeoffs of a zoom. But if you have a good lens in the 70-200 range, then the 100-400 is overlapping that in a big way and probably overkill.

Especially since these are all big, heavy lenses that you need to carry around. I definitely did not want a backpack with a 70-200F2.8, 100-400 AND a 300F4. God help me when I upgrade and buy that 500mm, I'll need a forklift. Keep weight and size and luggability in mind when making these decisions, too.

chuq (chuqui.smugmug.com if you want to look at images)

If you're a canon shooter, I'll second the 7D. I use it for most of my work, and it's great. I've also shot extensively with the 100-400, and Mike's note on it does a good job of explaining why it's a good answer for you.

Having said that, I've retired my 100-400 and I'm now shooting a different set of lenses, and depending on what your kit already looks like, you might want to go in another direction.

My go-to animal/bird lens is now the Canon 300 F4 + 1.4x teleconverter. I use it instead of the 100-400 because it is sharper (@ 400mm) and has faster and more accurate autofocus. The cost of a new 300 F4 + a new 1.4x is about the same as a 100-400 (maybe a bit more), but my experience is I get better images out of it.

Whether you go with the 300+1.4x or the 100-400 depends on the rest of your kit. If you have good lens coverage at 200mm and wider, then I don't think the 100-400 is the right lens for you. I carry the 24-104F4, the 70-200F2.8, and having upgraded my kit to include them, 99% of my shooting on the 100-400 was at 400mm, and in that case, that's not the best lens. If you're just building a kit and you plan on a lens that covers all of your telephoto needs, then the 100-400 may be the better option (the 24-104, 100-400 would be an interesting setup, for instance). Be aware the 100-400 softens above 300mm, but it's a very good lens. the 300F4+1.4x is noticably sharper to me, plus the faster AF helps in moving thing scenarios.

Which way you go depends on the rest of your kit. IMHO, if you need a dedicated wildlife/bird lens, I much prefer the 300+1.4 to the 100-400; if you need a lens that covers a wider range of images and is more of an extended telephoto, the 100-400 is the choice, but with some of the typical tradeoffs of a zoom. But if you have a good lens in the 70-200 range, then the 100-400 is overlapping that in a big way and probably overkill.

Especially since these are all big, heavy lenses that you need to carry around. I definitely did not want a backpack with a 70-200F2.8, 100-400 AND a 300F4. God help me when I upgrade and buy that 500mm, I'll need a forklift. Keep weight and size and luggability in mind when making these decisions, too.

1
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If you're a canon shooter, I'll second the 7D. I use it for most of my work, and it's great. I've also shot extensively with the 100-400, and Mike's note on it does a good job of explaining why it's a good answer for you.

Having said that, I've retired my 100-400 and I'm now shooting a different set of lenses, and depending on what your kit already looks like, you might want to go in another direction.

My go-to animal/bird lens is now the Canon 300 F4 + 1.4x teleconverter. I use it instead of the 100-400 because it is sharper (@ 400mm) and has faster and more accurate autofocus. The cost of a new 300 F4 + a new 1.4x is about the same as a 100-400 (maybe a bit more), but my experience is I get better images out of it.

Whether you go with the 300+1.4x or the 100-400 depends on the rest of your kit. If you have good lens coverage at 200mm and wider, then I don't think the 100-400 is the right lens for you. I carry the 24-104F4, the 70-200F2.8, and having upgraded my kit to include them, 99% of my shooting on the 100-400 was at 400mm, and in that case, that's not the best lens. If you're just building a kit and you plan on a lens that covers all of your telephoto needs, then the 100-400 may be the better option (the 24-104, 100-400 would be an interesting setup, for instance). Be aware the 100-400 softens above 300mm, but it's a very good lens. the 300F4+1.4x is noticably sharper to me, plus the faster AF helps in moving thing scenarios.

Which way you go depends on the rest of your kit. IMHO, if you need a dedicated wildlife/bird lens, I much prefer the 300+1.4 to the 100-400; if you need a lens that covers a wider range of images and is more of an extended telephoto, the 100-400 is the choice, but with some of the typical tradeoffs of a zoom. But if you have a good lens in the 70-200 range, then the 100-400 is overlapping that in a big way and probably overkill.

Especially since these are all big, heavy lenses that you need to carry around. I definitely did not want a backpack with a 70-200F2.8, 100-400 AND a 300F4. God help me when I upgrade and buy that 500mm, I'll need a forklift. Keep weight and size and luggability in mind when making these decisions, too.

chuq (chuqui.smugmug.com if you want to look at images)