6 added 154 characters in body
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Your choices are:

  1. Autofocus using some bright/contrasty point at infinity, switch to manual and don't touch the focus any more (still it's a good idea to verify your focus between shots).
  2. Focus manually (again using some bright point; most of the cameras will confirm focus, if it agrees with you, this can be helpful, but don't rely on it).
  3. Focus using the focusing scale (beware that the teles have a long way between last indicated distance and infinity). It's best to check beforehand if your focus scale is accurate at all focal lengths if you're using a zoom lens.
  4. Let the autofocus "saw" and when it can't find anything to focus on, it should settle at infinity, now switch to manual and take the shot. Verify this behaviour in good conditions.
  5. Use Live View and on-screen zoom for focusing if your camera supports it (there has to be something on your picture, right?).

Take the shot and verify if your focus is where it should be by zooming on the screen.

If non of this works, it's probably too dark anyway.

You can try some focusing aid systems like Canon's ST-E2, but I wouldn't be sure they're good at infinity and you'll probably fall back to point 4.

Your choices are:

  1. Autofocus using some bright/contrasty point at infinity, switch to manual and don't touch the focus any more (still it's a good idea to verify your focus between shots).
  2. Focus manually (again using some bright point; most of the cameras will confirm focus, if it agrees with you, this can be helpful, but don't rely on it).
  3. Focus using the focusing scale (beware that the teles have a long way between last indicated distance and infinity).
  4. Let the autofocus "saw" and when it can't find anything to focus on, it should settle at infinity, now switch to manual and take the shot.
  5. Use Live View and on-screen zoom for focusing if your camera supports it (there has to be something on your picture, right?).

Take the shot and verify if your focus is where it should be by zooming on the screen.

If non of this works, it's probably too dark anyway.

You can try some focusing aid systems like Canon's ST-E2, but I wouldn't be sure they're good at infinity and you'll probably fall back to point 4.

Your choices are:

  1. Autofocus using some bright/contrasty point at infinity, switch to manual and don't touch the focus any more (still it's a good idea to verify your focus between shots).
  2. Focus manually (again using some bright point; most of the cameras will confirm focus, if it agrees with you, this can be helpful, but don't rely on it).
  3. Focus using the focusing scale (beware that the teles have a long way between last indicated distance and infinity). It's best to check beforehand if your focus scale is accurate at all focal lengths if you're using a zoom lens.
  4. Let the autofocus "saw" and when it can't find anything to focus on, it should settle at infinity, now switch to manual and take the shot. Verify this behaviour in good conditions.
  5. Use Live View and on-screen zoom for focusing if your camera supports it (there has to be something on your picture, right?).

Take the shot and verify if your focus is where it should be by zooming on the screen.

If non of this works, it's probably too dark anyway.

You can try some focusing aid systems like Canon's ST-E2, but I wouldn't be sure they're good at infinity and you'll probably fall back to point 4.

5 added 134 characters in body
source | link

Your choices are:

  1. Autofocus using some bright/contrasty point at infinity, switch to manual and don't touch the focus any more (still it's a good idea to verify your focus between shots).
  2. Focus manually (again using some bright point; most of the cameras will confirm focus, if it agrees with you, this can be helpful, but don't rely on it).
  3. Focus using the focusing scale (beware that the teles have a long way between last indicated distance and infinity).
  4. Let the autofocus "saw" and when it can't find anything to focus on, it should settle at infinity, now switch to manual and take the shot.
  5. Use Live View and on-screen zoom for focusing if your camera supports it (there has to be something on your picture, right?).

Take the shot and verify if your focus is where it should be by zooming on the screen.

If non of this works, it's probably too dark anyway.

You can try some focusing aid systems like Canon's ST-E2, but I wouldn't be sure they're good at infinity and you'll probably fall back to point 4.

Your choices are:

  1. Autofocus using some bright/contrasty point at infinity, switch to manual and don't touch the focus any more (still it's a good idea to verify your focus between shots)
  2. Focus manually (again using some bright point; most of the cameras will confirm focus, if it agrees with you, this can be helpful, but don't rely on it)
  3. Focus using the focusing scale (beware that the teles have a long way between last indicated distance and infinity)
  4. Let the autofocus "saw" and when it can't find anything to focus on, it should settle at infinity, now switch to manual and take the shot.

Take the shot and verify if your focus is where it should be by zooming on the screen.

If non of this works, it's probably too dark anyway.

You can try some focusing aid systems like Canon's ST-E2, but I wouldn't be sure they're good at infinity and you'll probably fall back to point 4.

Your choices are:

  1. Autofocus using some bright/contrasty point at infinity, switch to manual and don't touch the focus any more (still it's a good idea to verify your focus between shots).
  2. Focus manually (again using some bright point; most of the cameras will confirm focus, if it agrees with you, this can be helpful, but don't rely on it).
  3. Focus using the focusing scale (beware that the teles have a long way between last indicated distance and infinity).
  4. Let the autofocus "saw" and when it can't find anything to focus on, it should settle at infinity, now switch to manual and take the shot.
  5. Use Live View and on-screen zoom for focusing if your camera supports it (there has to be something on your picture, right?).

Take the shot and verify if your focus is where it should be by zooming on the screen.

If non of this works, it's probably too dark anyway.

You can try some focusing aid systems like Canon's ST-E2, but I wouldn't be sure they're good at infinity and you'll probably fall back to point 4.

4 added 77 characters in body
source | link

Your choices are:

  1. Autofocus using some bright/contrasty point at infinity, switch to manual and don't touch the focus any more (still it's a good idea to verify your focus between shots)
  2. Focus manually (again using some bright point; it's not so hard actuallymost of the cameras will confirm focus, if it agrees with you, this can be helpful, but don't rely on it)
  3. Focus using the focusing scale (beware that the teles have a long way between last indicated distance and infinity)
  4. Let the autofocus "saw" and when it can't find anything to focus on, it should settle at infinity, now switch to manual and take the shot.

Take the shot and verify if your focus is where it should be by zooming on the screen.

If non of this works, it's probably too dark anyway.

You can try some focusing aid systems like Canon's ST-E2, but I wouldn't be sure they're good at infinity and you'll probably fall back to point 4.

Your choices are:

  1. Autofocus using some bright/contrasty point at infinity, switch to manual and don't touch the focus any more (still it's a good idea to verify your focus between shots)
  2. Focus manually (again using some bright point; it's not so hard actually)
  3. Focus using the focusing scale (beware that the teles have a long way between last indicated distance and infinity)
  4. Let the autofocus "saw" and when it can't find anything to focus on, it should settle at infinity, now switch to manual and take the shot.

Take the shot and verify if your focus is where it should be by zooming on the screen.

If non of this works, it's probably too dark anyway.

You can try some focusing aid systems like Canon's ST-E2, but I wouldn't be sure they're good at infinity and you'll probably fall back to point 4.

Your choices are:

  1. Autofocus using some bright/contrasty point at infinity, switch to manual and don't touch the focus any more (still it's a good idea to verify your focus between shots)
  2. Focus manually (again using some bright point; most of the cameras will confirm focus, if it agrees with you, this can be helpful, but don't rely on it)
  3. Focus using the focusing scale (beware that the teles have a long way between last indicated distance and infinity)
  4. Let the autofocus "saw" and when it can't find anything to focus on, it should settle at infinity, now switch to manual and take the shot.

Take the shot and verify if your focus is where it should be by zooming on the screen.

If non of this works, it's probably too dark anyway.

You can try some focusing aid systems like Canon's ST-E2, but I wouldn't be sure they're good at infinity and you'll probably fall back to point 4.

3 added 90 characters in body
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2 added 90 characters in body
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