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Here is a histogram (Colors | Info | Histogram in GIMP) of that photo:

histogram of original photo

That peak at the far right implies clipping: in this case there were a lot of pixels that were too bright for the exposure settings and were all given the same (pure white) value. Generally you want to avoid a peak at either edge, since that often indicates the exposure isn't set right for the scene.

A way around this is to check the histogram display on your camera after you take each picture: if you see a peak at one end of the histogram, you are losing some information and you should adjust your exposure (note: there is a common piece of advice to "expose to the right," which is actually what you did here) to compensate. (If you see a peak at both ends (and your picture does have a small peak at the dark end), you're losing both light tones and dark tones; one solution is to use HDR techniques.)

http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/7616/what-is-dynamic-range-and-how-is-it-important-in-photographyWhat is dynamic range and how is it important in photography? explains the concept a little more.

Here is a histogram (Colors | Info | Histogram in GIMP) of that photo:

histogram of original photo

That peak at the far right implies clipping: in this case there were a lot of pixels that were too bright for the exposure settings and were all given the same (pure white) value. Generally you want to avoid a peak at either edge, since that often indicates the exposure isn't set right for the scene.

A way around this is to check the histogram display on your camera after you take each picture: if you see a peak at one end of the histogram, you are losing some information and you should adjust your exposure (note: there is a common piece of advice to "expose to the right," which is actually what you did here) to compensate. (If you see a peak at both ends (and your picture does have a small peak at the dark end), you're losing both light tones and dark tones; one solution is to use HDR techniques.)

http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/7616/what-is-dynamic-range-and-how-is-it-important-in-photography explains the concept a little more.

Here is a histogram (Colors | Info | Histogram in GIMP) of that photo:

histogram of original photo

That peak at the far right implies clipping: in this case there were a lot of pixels that were too bright for the exposure settings and were all given the same (pure white) value. Generally you want to avoid a peak at either edge, since that often indicates the exposure isn't set right for the scene.

A way around this is to check the histogram display on your camera after you take each picture: if you see a peak at one end of the histogram, you are losing some information and you should adjust your exposure (note: there is a common piece of advice to "expose to the right," which is actually what you did here) to compensate. (If you see a peak at both ends (and your picture does have a small peak at the dark end), you're losing both light tones and dark tones; one solution is to use HDR techniques.)

What is dynamic range and how is it important in photography? explains the concept a little more.

2 added 188 characters in body
source | link

Here is a histogram (Colors | Info | Histogram in GIMP) of that photo:

histogram of original photo

That peak at the far right is evidence of theimplies clipping: in this case there iswere a lot of color informationpixels that were too bright for the exposure settings and were all given the same (shades ofpure white on the shirt) that is being compressed intovalue. Generally you want to avoid a very small rangepeak at either edge, since that often indicates the exposure isn't set right for the scene.

A way around this is to check the histogram display on your camera after you take each picture: if you see a peak at one end of the histogram, you are losing some information and you should adjust your exposure (note: there is a common piece of advice to "expose to the right," which is actually what you did here) to compensate. (If you see a peak at both ends (and your picture does have a small peak at the dark end), you're losing both light tones and dark tones; one solution is to use HDR techniques.)

http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/7616/what-is-dynamic-range-and-how-is-it-important-in-photography explains the concept a little more.

Here is a histogram (Colors | Info | Histogram in GIMP) of that photo:

histogram of original photo

That peak at the far right is evidence of the clipping: there is a lot of color information (shades of white on the shirt) that is being compressed into a very small range.

A way around this is to check the histogram display on your camera after you take each picture: if you see a peak at one end of the histogram, you are losing some information and you should adjust your exposure (note: there is a common piece of advice to "expose to the right," which is actually what you did here) to compensate. (If you see a peak at both ends, you're losing both light tones and dark tones; one solution is to use HDR techniques.)

http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/7616/what-is-dynamic-range-and-how-is-it-important-in-photography explains the concept a little more.

Here is a histogram (Colors | Info | Histogram in GIMP) of that photo:

histogram of original photo

That peak at the far right implies clipping: in this case there were a lot of pixels that were too bright for the exposure settings and were all given the same (pure white) value. Generally you want to avoid a peak at either edge, since that often indicates the exposure isn't set right for the scene.

A way around this is to check the histogram display on your camera after you take each picture: if you see a peak at one end of the histogram, you are losing some information and you should adjust your exposure (note: there is a common piece of advice to "expose to the right," which is actually what you did here) to compensate. (If you see a peak at both ends (and your picture does have a small peak at the dark end), you're losing both light tones and dark tones; one solution is to use HDR techniques.)

http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/7616/what-is-dynamic-range-and-how-is-it-important-in-photography explains the concept a little more.

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source | link

Here is a histogram (Colors | Info | Histogram in GIMP) of that photo:

histogram of original photo

That peak at the far right is evidence of the clipping: there is a lot of color information (shades of white on the shirt) that is being compressed into a very small range.

A way around this is to check the histogram display on your camera after you take each picture: if you see a peak at one end of the histogram, you are losing some information and you should adjust your exposure (note: there is a common piece of advice to "expose to the right," which is actually what you did here) to compensate. (If you see a peak at both ends, you're losing both light tones and dark tones; one solution is to use HDR techniques.)

http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/7616/what-is-dynamic-range-and-how-is-it-important-in-photography explains the concept a little more.