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IMHO Select > Color Range is the way to go (fast and, I dare say, most semantically correct).

While you are in the aforementioned window, click your eyedropper tool on the little squares (foreground color and background color) in the COLOR panel (usually top right) to sample a color you previously determined in HSB, RGB, LAB or CMYK mode (or simply picked from the palette).

edit - I was about to forget: in Select > Color Range uncheck localized color clusters and set fuzziness to 0 (although you probably figured it out) to select exactly that color over your whole image.

IMHO Select > Color Range is the way to go (fast and, I dare say, most semantically correct).

While you are in the aforementioned window, click your eyedropper tool on the little squares (foreground color and background color) in the COLOR panel (usually top right) to sample a color you previously determined in HSB, RGB, LAB or CMYK mode (or simply picked from the palette).

IMHO Select > Color Range is the way to go (fast and, I dare say, most semantically correct).

While you are in the aforementioned window, click your eyedropper tool on the little squares (foreground color and background color) in the COLOR panel (usually top right) to sample a color you previously determined in HSB, RGB, LAB or CMYK mode (or simply picked from the palette).

edit - I was about to forget: in Select > Color Range uncheck localized color clusters and set fuzziness to 0 (although you probably figured it out) to select exactly that color over your whole image.

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source | link

IMHO Select > Color Range is the way to go (fast and, I dare say, most semantically correct).

While you are in the aforementioned window, click your eyedropper tool on the little squares (foreground color and background color) in the COLOR panel (usually top right) to sample a color you previously determined in HSB, RGB, LAB or CMYK mode (or simply picked from the palette).