5 broken images fixed (click 'rendered output' or 'side-by-side' to see the difference – images not uploaded to Imgur because the author didn't license them in a CC-BY-SA compatible manner); for more info, see https://gist.github.com/Glorfindel83/9d954d34385d2ac2597bbe864466259f
source | link

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture.

I've only done one of these, it could have been shot on a tripod but the location didn't allow it! I loaded the images in Photoshop, auto-aligned and then manually masked the overlap areas, this was quite easy as the frames are just the right distance apart to minimise overlap. A bit of overlap adds to the effect, too much can make it hard to see what going on.

Here are the original shots:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/frames.jpg

Photoshop's built in panorama tool has no trouble aligning the images:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/aligned.jpg

A drop shadow has been added to show where the edges are. As you can see there was a little panning. I did not shoot the images but I did the post production (and modelling :) the actual photos were taken by a friend of mine. Here are the images blended together:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/masked.jpg

Here are the masks used:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/masks.png

I did a bit more blending, rotated the image, and filled in some missing sky/foreground and adjusted the contrast slightly, here is the final image:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/final.jpg

The camera settings were 1/800s f/8.0 ISO200 22mm

I would be possible to automate the process of overlapping the subject by subtracting the common background areas and layering up the frames in chronological order.

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture.

I've only done one of these, it could have been shot on a tripod but the location didn't allow it! I loaded the images in Photoshop, auto-aligned and then manually masked the overlap areas, this was quite easy as the frames are just the right distance apart to minimise overlap. A bit of overlap adds to the effect, too much can make it hard to see what going on.

Here are the original shots:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/frames.jpg

Photoshop's built in panorama tool has no trouble aligning the images:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/aligned.jpg

A drop shadow has been added to show where the edges are. As you can see there was a little panning. I did not shoot the images but I did the post production (and modelling :) the actual photos were taken by a friend of mine. Here are the images blended together:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/masked.jpg

Here are the masks used:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/masks.png

I did a bit more blending, rotated the image, and filled in some missing sky/foreground and adjusted the contrast slightly, here is the final image:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/final.jpg

The camera settings were 1/800s f/8.0 ISO200 22mm

I would be possible to automate the process of overlapping the subject by subtracting the common background areas and layering up the frames in chronological order.

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture.

I've only done one of these, it could have been shot on a tripod but the location didn't allow it! I loaded the images in Photoshop, auto-aligned and then manually masked the overlap areas, this was quite easy as the frames are just the right distance apart to minimise overlap. A bit of overlap adds to the effect, too much can make it hard to see what going on.

Here are the original shots:

Photoshop's built in panorama tool has no trouble aligning the images:

A drop shadow has been added to show where the edges are. As you can see there was a little panning. I did not shoot the images but I did the post production (and modelling :) the actual photos were taken by a friend of mine. Here are the images blended together:

Here are the masks used:

I did a bit more blending, rotated the image, and filled in some missing sky/foreground and adjusted the contrast slightly, here is the final image:

The camera settings were 1/800s f/8.0 ISO200 22mm

I would be possible to automate the process of overlapping the subject by subtracting the common background areas and layering up the frames in chronological order.

    Bounty Ended with 100 reputation awarded by Maynard Case
4 added 759 characters in body
source | link

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture.

I've only done one of these, it could have been shot on a tripod but the location didn't allow it! I loaded the images in Photoshop, auto-aligned and then manually masked the overlap areas, this was quite easy as the frames are just the right distance apart to minimise overlap. A bit of overlap adds to the effect, too much can make it hard to see what going on.

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/ski.jpg Here are the original shots:

Althoughhttp://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/frames.jpg

Photoshop's built in panorama tool has no trouble aligning the images:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/aligned.jpg

A drop shadow has been added to show where the edges are. As you can see there was a little panning. I did not shoot the PP,images but I did the post production (and modelling :) the actual photos were taken by a friend of mine. Here are the images blended together:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/masked.jpg

Here are the masks used:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/masks.png

I did a bit more blending, rotated the image, and filled in some missing sky/foreground and adjusted the contrast slightly, here is the final image:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/final.jpg

The camera settings were 1/800s f/8.0 ISO200 22mm

I would be possible to automate the process of overlapping the subject by subtracting the common background areas and layering up the frames in chronological order.

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture.

I've only done one of these, it could have been shot on a tripod but the location didn't allow it! I loaded the images in Photoshop, auto-aligned and then manually masked the overlap areas, this was quite easy as the frames are just the right distance apart to minimise overlap. A bit of overlap adds to the effect, too much can make it hard to see what going on.

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/ski.jpg

Although I did the PP, the actual photos were taken by a friend of mine. The camera settings were 1/800s f/8.0 ISO200 22mm

I would be possible to automate the process of overlapping the subject by subtracting the common background areas and layering up the frames in chronological order.

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture.

I've only done one of these, it could have been shot on a tripod but the location didn't allow it! I loaded the images in Photoshop, auto-aligned and then manually masked the overlap areas, this was quite easy as the frames are just the right distance apart to minimise overlap. A bit of overlap adds to the effect, too much can make it hard to see what going on.

Here are the original shots:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/frames.jpg

Photoshop's built in panorama tool has no trouble aligning the images:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/aligned.jpg

A drop shadow has been added to show where the edges are. As you can see there was a little panning. I did not shoot the images but I did the post production (and modelling :) the actual photos were taken by a friend of mine. Here are the images blended together:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/masked.jpg

Here are the masks used:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/masks.png

I did a bit more blending, rotated the image, and filled in some missing sky/foreground and adjusted the contrast slightly, here is the final image:

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/action/final.jpg

The camera settings were 1/800s f/8.0 ISO200 22mm

I would be possible to automate the process of overlapping the subject by subtracting the common background areas and layering up the frames in chronological order.

3 added 50 characters in body
source | link

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture.

I've only done one of these, it could have been shot on a tripod but the location didn't allow it! I loaded the images in Photoshop, auto-aligned and then manually masked the overlap areas, this was quite easy as the frames are just the right distance apart to minimise overlap. A bit of overlap adds to the effect, too much can make it hard to see what going on.

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/ski.jpg

Although I did the PP, the actual photos were taken by a friend of mine. The camera settings were 1/800s f/8.0 ISO200 22mm

I would be possible to automate the process of overlapping the subject by subtracting the common background areas and layering up the frames in chronological order.

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture.

I've only done one of these, it could have been shot on a tripod but the location didn't allow it! I loaded the images in Photoshop, auto-aligned and then manually masked the overlap areas, this was quite easy as the frames are just the right distance apart to minimise overlap. A bit of overlap adds to the effect, too much can make it hard to see what going on.

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/ski.jpg

Although I did the PP, the actual photos were taken by a friend of mine.

I would be possible to automate the process of overlapping the subject by subtracting the common background areas and layering up the frames in chronological order.

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture.

I've only done one of these, it could have been shot on a tripod but the location didn't allow it! I loaded the images in Photoshop, auto-aligned and then manually masked the overlap areas, this was quite easy as the frames are just the right distance apart to minimise overlap. A bit of overlap adds to the effect, too much can make it hard to see what going on.

http://www.mattgrum.com/photo_se/ski.jpg

Although I did the PP, the actual photos were taken by a friend of mine. The camera settings were 1/800s f/8.0 ISO200 22mm

I would be possible to automate the process of overlapping the subject by subtracting the common background areas and layering up the frames in chronological order.

2 added 393 characters in body; added 9 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link