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Your camera has Minolta AF mount, which is the precursor to Sony A-mount. As others have already noted, which adapter may work depends on the specific lens you have.

Vivitar rebranded lenses made by other manufacturers for various mounts. The "same" lens was usually made for many different mounts. Unless your lens uses M42, T2, or TX mounts, I would not bother adapting it to Minolta AF mount.

Consider getting a lens designed specifically for your camera, such as Minolta AF 70-210/4. This lens in particular has a constant F4 aperture, excellent optics (by modern standards), and can be auto-focused and controlled by your camera. It is also fairly inexpensive and can be purchased for prices similar to that of some of the better adapters.


Vivitar rebranded lenses made by other manufacturers for various mounts. The "same" lens was usually made for many different mounts. Unless your lens uses M42, T2, or TX mounts, I would not bother adapting it to Minolta AF mount.

The problem with adapting to Minolta AF is the flange focal distance (44.5mm) is just long enough to make it impractical for most optics-free adapters to maintain infinity focus. If you are willing to use the lens only for close-up photography, you can use optics-free "macro" adapters that will not maintain infinity focus:

  • Canon FD
  • Pentax PK
  • Minolta MD
  • Nikon F
  • Olympus OM
  • Possibly others.

For many of the same mounts, there are also adapters that contain optics that maintain infinity focus, but multiply the focal length by 1.4x, so your 70-210mm lens would become a 98-294mm lens. The multiplier also decreases the amount of light used for exposure, so the lens becomes less useful in low light.

Your camera has Minolta AF mount, which is the precursor to Sony A-mount. As others have already noted, which adapter may work depends on the specific lens you have.

Vivitar rebranded lenses made by other manufacturers for various mounts. The "same" lens was usually made for many different mounts. Unless your lens uses M42, T2, or TX mounts, I would not bother adapting it to Minolta AF mount.

Consider getting a lens designed specifically for your camera, such as Minolta AF 70-210/4. This lens in particular has a constant F4 aperture, excellent optics (by modern standards), and can be auto-focused and controlled by your camera. It is also fairly inexpensive and can be purchased for prices similar to that of some of the better adapters.

The problem with adapting to Minolta AF is the flange focal distance (44.5mm) is just long enough to make it impractical for most optics-free adapters to maintain infinity focus. If you are willing to use the lens only for close-up photography, you can use optics-free "macro" adapters that will not maintain infinity focus:

  • Canon FD
  • Pentax PK
  • Minolta MD
  • Nikon F
  • Olympus OM
  • Possibly others.

For many of the same mounts, there are also adapters that contain optics that maintain infinity focus, but multiply the focal length by 1.4x, so your 70-210mm lens would become a 98-294mm lens. The multiplier also decreases the amount of light used for exposure, so the lens becomes less useful in low light.

Your camera has Minolta AF mount, which is the precursor to Sony A-mount. As others have already noted, which adapter may work depends on the specific lens you have.

Consider getting a lens designed specifically for your camera, such as Minolta AF 70-210/4. This lens in particular has a constant F4 aperture, excellent optics (by modern standards), and can be auto-focused and controlled by your camera. It is also fairly inexpensive and can be purchased for prices similar to that of some of the better adapters.


Vivitar rebranded lenses made by other manufacturers for various mounts. The "same" lens was usually made for many different mounts. Unless your lens uses M42, T2, or TX mounts, I would not bother adapting it to Minolta AF mount.

The problem with adapting to Minolta AF is the flange focal distance (44.5mm) is just long enough to make it impractical for most optics-free adapters to maintain infinity focus. If you are willing to use the lens only for close-up photography, you can use optics-free "macro" adapters that will not maintain infinity focus:

  • Canon FD
  • Pentax PK
  • Minolta MD
  • Nikon F
  • Olympus OM
  • Possibly others.

For many of the same mounts, there are also adapters that contain optics that maintain infinity focus, but multiply the focal length by 1.4x, so your 70-210mm lens would become a 98-294mm lens. The multiplier also decreases the amount of light used for exposure, so the lens becomes less useful in low light.

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source | link

Your camera has Minolta AF mount, which is the precursor to Sony A-mount. As others have already noted, which adapter may work depends on the specific lens you have.

Vivitar rebranded lenses made by other manufacturers for various mounts. The "same" lens was usually made for many different mounts. Unless your lens uses M42, T2, or TX mounts, I would not bother adapting it to Minolta AF mount.

Consider getting a lens designed specifically for your camera, such as Minolta AF 70-210/4. This lens in particular has a constant F4 aperture, excellent optics (by modern standards), and can be auto-focused and controlled by your camera. It is also fairly inexpensive and can be purchased for prices similar to that of some of the better adapters.

The problem with adaptersadapting to Minolta AF is the flange focal distance (44.5mm) is just long enough to make it practically impossibleimpractical for most optics-free adapters to maintain infinity focus. If you are willing to use the lens only for close-up photography, you can use optics-free "macro" adapters that will not maintain infinity focus:

  • Canon FD
  • Pentax PK
  • Minolta MD
  • Nikon F
  • Olympus OM
  • Possibly others.

For many of the same mounts, there are also adapters that contain optics that maintain infinity focus, but multiply the focal length by 1.4x, so your 70-210mm lens would become a 98-294mm lens. The multiplier also decreases the amount of light used for exposure, so the lens becomes less useful in low light.

Your camera has Minolta AF mount, which is the precursor to Sony A-mount. As others have already noted, which adapter may work depends on the specific lens you have.

Vivitar rebranded lenses made by other manufacturers for various mounts. The "same" lens was usually made for many different mounts. Unless your lens uses M42, T2, or TX mounts, I would not bother adapting it to Minolta AF mount.

Consider getting a lens designed specifically for your camera, such as Minolta AF 70-210/4. This lens in particular has a constant F4 aperture, excellent optics, and can be auto-focused and controlled by your camera.

The problem with adapters to Minolta AF is the flange focal distance (44.5mm) is just long enough to make it practically impossible for most optics-free adapters to maintain infinity focus. If you are willing to use the lens only for close-up photography, you can use optics-free "macro" adapters that will not maintain infinity focus:

  • Canon FD
  • Pentax PK
  • Minolta MD
  • Nikon F
  • Olympus OM
  • Possibly others.

For many of the same mounts, there are also adapters that contain optics that maintain infinity focus, but multiply the focal length by 1.4x, so your 70-210mm lens would become a 98-294mm lens. The multiplier also decreases the amount of light used for exposure, so the lens becomes less useful in low light.

Your camera has Minolta AF mount, which is the precursor to Sony A-mount. As others have already noted, which adapter may work depends on the specific lens you have.

Vivitar rebranded lenses made by other manufacturers for various mounts. The "same" lens was usually made for many different mounts. Unless your lens uses M42, T2, or TX mounts, I would not bother adapting it to Minolta AF mount.

Consider getting a lens designed specifically for your camera, such as Minolta AF 70-210/4. This lens in particular has a constant F4 aperture, excellent optics (by modern standards), and can be auto-focused and controlled by your camera. It is also fairly inexpensive and can be purchased for prices similar to that of some of the better adapters.

The problem with adapting to Minolta AF is the flange focal distance (44.5mm) is just long enough to make it impractical for most optics-free adapters to maintain infinity focus. If you are willing to use the lens only for close-up photography, you can use optics-free "macro" adapters that will not maintain infinity focus:

  • Canon FD
  • Pentax PK
  • Minolta MD
  • Nikon F
  • Olympus OM
  • Possibly others.

For many of the same mounts, there are also adapters that contain optics that maintain infinity focus, but multiply the focal length by 1.4x, so your 70-210mm lens would become a 98-294mm lens. The multiplier also decreases the amount of light used for exposure, so the lens becomes less useful in low light.

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Your camera has Minolta AF mount, which is the precursor to Sony A-mount. As others have already noted, which adapter may work depends on the specific lens you have.

Vivitar rebranded lenses made by other manufacturers for various mounts. The "same" lens was usually made for many different mounts. Unless your lens uses M42, T2, or TX mounts, I would not bother adapting it to Minolta AF mount. Instead,  

considerConsider getting a lens designed specifically for your camera, such as Minolta AF 70-210/4. This lens in particular has a constant F4 aperture, excellent optics, and can be auto-focused and controlled by your camera.

The problem with adapters to Minolta AF is the flange focal distance of 44(44.5mm) is just long enough to make it practically impossible for most optics-free adapters to maintain infinity focus. If you are willing to use the lens only for close-up photography, you can use optics-free "macro" adapters that will not maintain infinity focus:

  • Canon FD
  • Pentax PK
  • Minolta MD
  • Nikon F
  • Olympus OM
  • Possibly others.

For many of the same mounts, there are also adapters that contain optics that maintain infinity focus. Such optics usually, but multiply the focal length (and aperture) by by 1.4x, so your 70-210mm lens would become a 98-294mm lens. The multiplier also decreases the amount of light used for exposure, so the lens becomes less useful in low light.

Your camera has Minolta AF mount, which is the precursor to Sony A-mount. As others have already noted, which adapter may work depends on the specific lens you have.

Vivitar rebranded lenses made by other manufacturers for various mounts. The "same" lens was usually made for many different mounts. Unless your lens uses M42, T2, or TX mounts, I would not bother adapting it to Minolta AF mount. Instead, consider getting a lens designed specifically for your camera, such as Minolta AF 70-210/4. This lens in particular has a constant F4 aperture, excellent optics, and can be auto-focused and controlled by your camera.

The problem is the flange focal distance of 44.5mm is just long enough to make it practically impossible for most optics-free adapters to maintain infinity focus. If you are willing to use the lens only for close-up photography, you can use optics-free "macro" adapters that will not maintain infinity focus:

  • Canon FD
  • Pentax PK
  • Minolta MD
  • Nikon F
  • Olympus OM
  • Possibly others.

For many of the same mounts, there are also adapters that contain optics that maintain infinity focus. Such optics usually multiply the focal length (and aperture) by 1.4x, so your 70-210mm lens would become a 98-294mm lens.

Your camera has Minolta AF mount, which is the precursor to Sony A-mount. As others have already noted, which adapter may work depends on the specific lens you have.

Vivitar rebranded lenses made by other manufacturers for various mounts. The "same" lens was usually made for many different mounts. Unless your lens uses M42, T2, or TX mounts, I would not bother adapting it to Minolta AF mount. 

Consider getting a lens designed specifically for your camera, such as Minolta AF 70-210/4. This lens in particular has a constant F4 aperture, excellent optics, and can be auto-focused and controlled by your camera.

The problem with adapters to Minolta AF is the flange focal distance (44.5mm) is just long enough to make it practically impossible for most optics-free adapters to maintain infinity focus. If you are willing to use the lens only for close-up photography, you can use optics-free "macro" adapters that will not maintain infinity focus:

  • Canon FD
  • Pentax PK
  • Minolta MD
  • Nikon F
  • Olympus OM
  • Possibly others.

For many of the same mounts, there are also adapters that contain optics that maintain infinity focus, but multiply the focal length by 1.4x, so your 70-210mm lens would become a 98-294mm lens. The multiplier also decreases the amount of light used for exposure, so the lens becomes less useful in low light.

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