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Assuming the same number of pixels, they would be identical in shape and depth of field giving the same aperture (not aperture number but the full f:x.y ratio) and using an ISO value larger by a factor of 2.56 on the crop camera. When you use the same ISO and the same aperture number, the depth of field grows by the crop factor.

There is a reason people use larger sensors for more light and/or less depth of field. 

Assuming the same number of pixels, they would be identical in shape and depth of field giving the same aperture (not aperture number but the full f:x.y ratio) and using an ISO value larger by a factor of 2.56 on the crop camera. When you use the same ISO and the same aperture number, the depth of field grows by the crop factor.

There is a reason people use larger sensors for more light and/or less depth of field.

Assuming the same number of pixels, they would be identical in shape and depth of field giving the same aperture (not aperture number but the full f:x.y ratio) and using an ISO value larger by a factor of 2.56 on the crop camera. When you use the same ISO and the same aperture number, the depth of field grows by the crop factor.

There is a reason people use larger sensors for more light and/or less depth of field. 

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source | link

Assuming the same number of pixels, they would be identical in shape and depth of field giving the same aperture (not aperture number but the full f:x.y ratio) and using an ISO value larger by a factor of 2.56 on the crop camera. When you use the same ISO and the same aperture number, the depth of field grows by the crop factor.

There is a reason people use larger sensors for more light and/or less depth of field.