Incense

by Bart Arondson

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

1,843 reputation
1614
bio website groovbird.blogspot.com
location Wetteren, Belgium
age 39
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen Oct 8 at 20:42
I like photography, music and electronics.

Aug
17
comment If PNG is Lossless Why Does Difference Blending Mode Show a Difference
PNG is a bad choice of format for photography.
Aug
17
comment If PNG is Lossless Why Does Difference Blending Mode Show a Difference
There's no lossy compression in PNG. The closest thing you can call 'lossy' is the "blur-before-compression optimization" trick.
Aug
7
comment What are the advantages of shooting in a proprietary RAW format over DNG?
@JorgeCórdoba I have personal experience that the reverse is true. At the time, DxO did not want to read DNGs because they don't support it. In their own words: "DxO has never supported DNG files as an input option. DNG files have had their EXIF altered, and our program can not read altered EXIFs because they change the critical information needed to make our program able to do the corrections that it can do."
Aug
7
answered What are the advantages of shooting in a proprietary RAW format over DNG?
Aug
5
comment Colour shifts in Cross Processed film
Also, there's different types of cross processing. Perhaps you could enlighten us with the process that was used to develop the film? The film is meant to be processed with the C41 process which is a process for color negatives, which is rare for slide films that use the E-6 process.
Aug
5
comment Colour shifts in Cross Processed film
From the product description I read that the Sunset Strip film is precolored, meaning that it's meant to do strange things with colors. Perhaps the result of the cross processing is the overreaction to the precoloring, which is why all of the shots have about the same tint/behavior?
Aug
4
comment What are the advantages of shooting in a proprietary RAW format over DNG?
What recent changes?
Aug
4
comment What are the advantages of shooting in a proprietary RAW format over DNG?
It occured to me that, while I'm convinced this is the right answer, it may be the right answer for a different question.
Jul
15
awarded  Yearling
Mar
14
comment How to rate the optical quality of a used lens?
You can smell the lens, because cigarette smoke leaves a pungent residue that you can pick up easily if you hold your nose to it. +1 on the fungus. You can check by pointing the lens to a bight sky a peering into it from very close in the back.
Jan
2
revised What can a fisheye lens be useful for?
Removed old link, included examples directly.
Dec
28
comment What can a fisheye lens be useful for?
You're right. I've abandoned my Flickr account. I'll see what I can do.
Jul
15
awarded  Yearling
May
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
18
comment What is RAW, technically?
let us continue this discussion in chat
Jan
18
comment What is RAW, technically?
The DNG format supports embedding the original RAW file in its entirety. Why is that, you think? Some camera vendor may come up with a system that allows sensor information that is so complex that it cannot be represented by any of DNG's standards, so no, DNG is not RAW, RAW is by definition up to the camera vendor, so it's proprietary, and conversion from RAW to DNG results unavoidably in data loss because you can't prove that it will never result in data loss. Just because you don't know what is lost, or you don't care about what is lost, doesn't mean that it's not lost.
Jan
18
comment What is RAW, technically?
Lastly, you may have a camera that shoots DNG RAW images, so there won't any loss of information, but that does not apply to DNG in general.
Jan
18
comment What is RAW, technically?
It happened to me years ago. I naively converted some of my RAWs to DNG and threw away the originals, only to find out that DxO (a product that publicly states that it supports DNG) did not want to read my DNG files. Live and learn.
Jan
18
comment What is RAW, technically?
@FakeName The DNG converter does not have any more information about the picture that was taken than what's in the RAW file that's being converted, so it can't add information to it. All it can do is take all the information that comes from the RAW file that fits in the DNG specification, and discard everything else. That may or may not be more or less than what you care about, but it's a simple fact. Some camera vendor may put in more information in the RAW format than that is supported by either the DNG specification or the DNG converter used at the time of conversion.