Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

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13,698 reputation
1544
bio website j.mp/NZPHOTOS
location Auckland, New Zealand
age
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 16 hours ago

Electronic designer. Professional Engineer. Oldish aka "reasonably experienced" :-).
Contact - apptechnz gmail com <- you know the drill.
Tel: +64 9 837 2999 gmt+13

Special interest in technological solutions for developing country applications. Extensive in-China experience in product development & manufacturing in China.

Jack of all trades, Master of Electrical engineering. (aka ME (elec)) Interested in all aspects of modern technology. Professional qualifications in electrical engineering but practically proficient or conversant in many peripheral areas.

Recent extensive experience in solar powered LED lighting development and manufacturing in China for markets worldwide.

"Servant of the Most High God" / committed Christian. Happy to work enthusiastically and interact amicably with people of all nationalities and creeds.

Married with 2 adult children.

Obsessional photographer.


Jun
4
comment Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
@SonicSoul - Yes - sensor noise is integrated with time. Longer exposures = more noise. There are a number of noise sources and not all add linearly but a major portion does. The above is the best answer given so far, but nobody has noticed, and they never may :-).
Jun
4
revised How can I resize more than 2GB of travel photography with no quality compromise?
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Jun
4
comment How can I resize more than 2GB of travel photography with no quality compromise?
Nah - he's just got 40 or 50 D800 images :-).
Jun
4
revised How can I resize more than 2GB of travel photography with no quality compromise?
added 485 characters in body
Jun
4
answered How can I resize more than 2GB of travel photography with no quality compromise?
Jun
4
comment Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
... I would quite like to own a D7000 :-).
Jun
4
comment Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
I right clicked on the tinypic images on their site, downloaded to disk using Windows "Save image as" and then opened the images. They then contained EXIF data. Note that the very small aperture in the 160 ISO image leads to 30x longer exposure times than is "fair" . This leads me to the conclusion that ....
Jun
4
answered Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
Jun
4
comment Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
@SonicSoul If you increased ISO and decreased exposure time in proportion aperture will remain constant (or increased both). This would be most usual when making comparisons. This is a "fair" tradeoff between ISO and exposure time. BUT when going from 1600 to 160 you not only made exposure time longer by the ISO change ratio = 1600/160 = 10:1 BUT you chaged from f/4 to f/22 which increased the exposure time needed by a FURTHER (22/4) squared = 30 times !!! So you have 30 times as much exposure time noise in the ISO 160 photos than if you has stayed at f/4.
Jun
4
revised Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
added 52 characters in body
Jun
4
comment Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
Images that are on the tinypic site are much reduced from originals (only 1.7 megapixels. The difference in the paint runs is so far not explained. I added exposure times above as the 1/40s to 8s difference is so vast that it needs to be known about when trying to make comparisons. If your tripod is not rock-of-Gibraltar steady then 8s will alter result. Also added focal length as this affects long exposure tripod result.
Jun
4
revised Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
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Jun
4
answered What uses does tone mapping have beyond HDR?
Jun
4
comment Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
Consider the points in my answer re technical differences in how the photos were taken. The two sets of settings are so different as to make comparison unlikely to be meaningful. Comment on why would be very interesting. Also details differ in the photos suggesting something arcane was at work in the processing. Do you know why or how this happened?
Jun
4
comment Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
...lighting levels in some other part of the picture. eg in a real world example this may be a corner bookshelf in an otherwise brightly lit scene with the main focus on eg a character by a window. In such a case the proper choice is to let the shadows "noise up" so that the subject highlights are not blown. ie you can certainly push the camera into situations where low ISO is worse in some parts of the picture but the supplied example is unlikely for the main subject in a photo. A "live view" screen in the top case would have been 4 stops too dark,almost unviewable and not liable to be used.
Jun
4
comment Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
Without knowing the light level in the photo(s) it is not possible to be sure what effects are occurring but it seems likely that the 100 ISO image was underexposed, and so amplified by the camera based on the information provided such that available low level bits of ADC output were discarded, whereas if they had been retained the result would have been better to far better. ie if this is the case, then what Matt is saying is true BUT effectively the user is lying to the camera. This setting in this light level says that the user values higher .. It is very likely that processing
Jun
4
answered Why do these images taken at significantly different ISO appear equal in quality?
Jun
4
comment What is Canon's Super Spectra Coating?
ie it means "We use a coating that we have developed that does what we need a coating to do. It works better than the old stuff we used to use. Don't ask."
Jun
4
comment What is Canon's Super Spectra Coating?
Super spectra is the same as "Double whammy super bling extended +++ coating" - ie it is a marketing name that by itself may or may not have some meaning. Canon say: "Canon's multi layer Super Spectra coating allows up to 99.9% of light through to the CMOS sensor, over a range that extends from ultra violet to near-infrared light. As well as minimising ghosting and flare, Super Spectra Coating ensures a consistent colour balance across all EF lenses and plays a key part in delivering the sharp, high-contrast results that Canon lenses are renowned for."
Jun
4
revised Why does this shot appear to have the miniature “tilt-shift” effect?
added 96 characters in body