India Point Park

India Point Park
by matt-ball                

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27/20 answers
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Jun
22
comment What's the best way to avoid wasting money on equipment?
@jrista upvotes and comments on the question and answers seem to disagree with your opinion - there are members in community who have found them useful. I did my best to craft the question according to FAQ and feedback received. Why not improve the question and provide a better answer, as suggested in the FAQ?
Jun
20
comment What's the best way to avoid wasting money on equipment?
@rfusca actually, he also suggests a $600+ "almost as good" package near the end of article. Perhaps the takeaway idea in @Jakub's answer is "Don't expect to use something cheap and get away with it". IMHO for any piece of equipment, we can make the argument that if it's significantly cheaper than all competing products at the generally accepted "good enough" level, it is also clearly inferior to that "good enough" level in some important way.
Jun
20
comment What's the best way to avoid wasting money on equipment?
Since most of the answers give more generic advice than pointing to specific items/categories, I edited the question for a better match to the answers it has brought.
Jun
20
comment What's the best way to avoid wasting money on equipment?
@Billy NAS is "Nikon Acquisition Syndrome", a progressive disease starting with an itchy wallet that makes its victim collect more Nikon gear than reasonable for the amount and variety of photos the victim takes.
Jun
20
comment What's the best way to avoid wasting money on equipment?
With reviews, I'd say it's important to look for context of the reviewer. If it's missing or much different than yours, there are certainly aspects of usage important for you but not covered in the review. In any case, relying on a single review should be avoided in favor of a more thorough research.
Jun
20
comment What's the best way to avoid wasting money on equipment?
+1 for renting on a weekly basis - a day or two might not be enough for learning how to use new gear efficiently.
Jun
20
comment What's the best way to avoid wasting money on equipment?
As Thom Hogan suggests, cost of several inadequate tripods bought as upgrades for each other would get you a nice lens.
Jun
20
comment What's the best way to avoid wasting money on equipment?
@jwenting "wasting" is better defined in my question text - the item fails to solve well the problem it was bought/rented to solve.
Jun
20
comment What's the best way to avoid wasting money on equipment?
@rfusca edited to make it clear only the worst cases are expected as answers, so it's more in line with apparently well-accepted questions "What are the best techniques for ...". The actual problem here is that my wish list is much longer than my available budget, so any experiences helping to avoid common traps are warmly welcome. I think Jerry Coffin's answer about long lenses or Thom Hogan's article on avoiding unstable tripods are excellent examples of good answers to this question.
Jun
19
comment What is the difference between depth of field and depth of focus?
@Fracesco I edited my answer to include that
Jun
17
comment Why does the quality of my pictures lower the more I zoom in?
@John not in low light; but daytime, using a higher ISO, you can get a pretty decent shutter speed for handheld shooting. According to "sunny 16" rule you should be getting 1/1600s at f/11 with ISO 800 in a sunny day. This speed should be OK to catch a larger bird in flight (200mm is too short for the little ones anyway). Maybe even 1/800 at ISO 400 would do.
Jun
17
comment Why there is no Canon 50mm *IS* lens?
@Jon.Griffen on a Pentax body, all lenses are stabilized; so you could either pick a Pentax-M, a Zeiss, or a Samyang/Rokinon lens. Or you could go with Sony body+lens.
Jun
15
comment How to reduce the effect of bright day light in the photographs?
@Anisha Custom white balance should be set under the same light you are going to take the picture, preferably close to where your subject will be (because there may be multiple light sources, or some reflecting surface also throwing in some color).
Jun
15
comment How to reduce the effect of bright day light in the photographs?
@Anisha that's why white balance should usually (unless you want a tinge) be set from a gray or white surface; if you use an orange surface, then camera will assume the light is orange, and will adjust all the other colors by subtracting orange from them. Black is unsuitable because the camera will not see any light and either picks something random or shows some error message.
Jun
14
comment What does the magnification ratio number mean on a macro lens?
@jrista your ref gives an error page; anyway, I would not consider bing.com, a search engine, ultimate source of truth. Photo.SE answers about what makes a macro lens indicate that it's enough if the lens focuses close, with 1:1 being a special case. If only 1:1 would be "true macro", we would have to make sure that photos made with 1:1 lens focused even a bit further than minimal focusing distance would NOT be called macro photography, because then they are already less than 1:1.
Jun
14
comment What does the magnification ratio number mean on a macro lens?
@jrista I doubt there is any "official" definition of "macro", but yes, such line is drawn quite often; added a note on that.
Jun
14
comment How to reduce the effect of bright day light in the photographs?
@Anisha By "special equipment", I mean anything that would help you to shoot from a higher position, be it a tripod, monopod, ladder, kite, hydraulic lift, ... You'd need a bigger aperture (f divided by a smaller number) for blurring background, f/22 would be even worse than f/8.
Jun
14
comment How to reduce the effect of bright day light in the photographs?
@Anisha Yes, it makes sense. You'd have to keep the angle to ground the same - so shoot from higher when further away. Of course, it might be impossible without special equipment. Another possibility is to find a similar tree+puddle combination with a better background - try starting with other trees around the same puddle.
Jun
14
comment How to reduce the effect of bright day light in the photographs?
@Anisha The idea of the reflection is great, but the photo is ruined by the bright white and red houses in background. They are not intended to be part of composition, but their color and sharpness demands attention from viewer. A shallow depth of field (not achievable for such a large scene using a small sensor camera) and tighter perspective (shooting and zooming from further away) might help to alleviate this.
Jun
14
comment How to reduce the effect of bright day light in the photographs?
@Anisha I edited, hope it's better explained now