Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen May 14 at 13:36

May
24
awarded  Student
May
24
awarded  Editor
May
24
revised How do I judge tripod sturdiness when buying online?
wording of title
May
24
asked How do I judge tripod sturdiness when buying online?
Feb
19
comment What is the 'Golden Ratio' and why is it better than the 'Rule of Thirds?'
@Matt: absolutely agreed! @Nick: in the first composition, there are several very prominent vertical lines, and none of them line up with the golden ratio. Just roughly eyeballing, I think if you set up that picture with a √2 ratio grid over it, the lines would coincide quite well with some significant features of the photograph. On the other hand — while I think you’re overinterpreting the mathematical aspects of the composition, those are some gorgeous photos! Lovely how you pick up on and get great results from what must have been pretty tough lighting to work with.
Feb
19
comment What is the 'Golden Ratio' and why is it better than the 'Rule of Thirds?'
There’s a lovely recent book “The Golden Ratio” by Mario Livio, in my opinion the best of the Golden Ratio books I’ve read. It takes quite a skeptical approach, and debunks some of the common claims — but that, to me, make the many fascinating things which remain all the more impressive and beautiful — knowing that they really do stand up to a lot of careful scrutiny.
Feb
19
comment What is the 'Golden Ratio' and why is it better than the 'Rule of Thirds?'
And the golden ratio happens to lie within that general range. So does 1 1/2; so does √2; so do many other mathematically interesting numbers. Within that general range, the golden ratio doesn’t actually stand out as any more common than the numbers around it — or at least that’s what people who’ve try to make unbiased collections of the data always find. When one goes in looking for the golden ratio, it’s easy to subconsciously cherry-pick your rectangles: eg on the Parthenon, there are choices like how many steps to include, etc. [cont’d]
Feb
19
comment What is the 'Golden Ratio' and why is it better than the 'Rule of Thirds?'
@Nick: but I think the point is, it doesn’t occur in nature (nor in art, nor music, nor probably in your photography) nearly as much as the myth can lead us to think. There are a few examples in nature (eg phyllotaxis) where it’s been plausibly demonstrated that the golden ratio itself — that exact value — really is significant. But for many of the claimed examples, its apparent presence is largely selection bias. It’s clear that there’s a range of numbers around that value which are objectively aesthetically preferable, and are statistically common in art. [cont’d]
Jan
24
awarded  Supporter