Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

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1,564 reputation
1733
bio website
location New York, NY
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 2 days ago

I am a career computer scientist and just decided to pick up photography as a hobby. I just got my first camera! I'll keep my list of gear up-to-date:

Bodies:

  • Nikon D7000

Lenses:

  • AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED
  • AF-S DX NIKKOR 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5G ED
  • AF-S NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR

Tripods:

  • Gorillapod SLR-Zoom
  • Vanguard Tracker PT-28 (legs) with Vanguard SBH-100 (ball head)

Jan
8
comment How do you photograph artwork in a glass picture frame?
Well put, and I always love your diagrams. What did you use to make this one?
Jan
8
comment What's “real” and what's “virtual” on a (digital) camera?
I agree with @mmr. Take a look at this question I asked: photo.stackexchange.com/questions/5883/…. You don't even have to go as high end as I went, but I think the same principles apply.
Jan
8
awarded  Quorum
Jan
8
comment Should I buy this Nikon 50mm f/1.8?
@Reid: I'm not sure about "what's an acceptable price...". I suppose it's fine but it gets into the discussion on meta where we were saying that information gets out of date. Also, "is lens X a good lens?" is only a valid question when it's followed by "and when would I use it?" because it depends on what you use it for :-). The "when would I use it?" questions are great questions for this site.
Jan
8
comment Should I buy this Nikon 50mm f/1.8?
@Jay Lance Photography: I think the question should be rephrased. Don't you think "Should I by this..." is not something any of us can answer. The OP needs to decide on his own after we give him hard facts about the lens: what the typical going rate is, how it behaves in different conditions, what it's compatible with. I don't think this question is not useful... but I think as stated it's not too helpful.
Jan
7
comment Should I buy this Nikon 50mm f/1.8?
I'm new to this too but here's my understanding: You can decrease the shutter speed, but honestly, you can only go so low especially if things are moving. If people are standing still, maybe you can use a low shutter speed, but you probably won't be able to go to 1/2 or 1 sec. Once you push the limit of shutter speed you can try to increase ISO. You have a D7000 which is great at going to high ISOs. But again, there will be a limit because at some point your pictures will get too grainy. If that won't work, you simply need more light: that's where your flash comes in.
Jan
7
comment Should I buy this Nikon 50mm f/1.8?
Here's a possibly relevant discussion on meta: meta.photo.stackexchange.com/questions/529/…
Jan
7
comment Should I buy this Nikon 50mm f/1.8?
I've flagged this question for moderator attention. It's quite specific and subjective. It also entirely depends on your budget. Perhaps we can reword differently to make it more generally useful? Otherwise it should probably be closed.
Jan
7
comment Should I buy this Nikon 50mm f/1.8?
As I commented on another answer: a wide aperture is not necessarily great for low light. If I want to get a good picture of the entire room with a bunch of people in it, a shallow depth of field is undesirable. I would need to look for other means of dealing with low light. However, a wide aperture is great for a low light portrait.
Jan
7
comment Should I buy this Nikon 50mm f/1.8?
Just don't get fooled into thinking that you can just open the aperture wide when you're in low light and get great shots. It depends on what you mean by "great". And "shallow depth of field" better be in your definition of "great" because that's what will happen with the aperture wide open. If you want a lot of detail in a picture with low light, you are going to have to find other ways to compensate lighting: use flash, raise ISO, decrease shutter speed.
Jan
6
comment In portrait photography, what is 'broad' lighting? What is 'short' lighting?
this has "self-learner" written all over it :-). photo.stackexchange.com/badges/14/self-learner
Jan
6
comment Image stabilization in aerial photography
I must admit: I'm a little curious as to why you asked this question :-). Did you get any shots from a plane or helictoper?
Jan
6
revised What aperture should I use to photograph people and why?
edited tags
Jan
5
comment Which is best as part of a fast workflow: Picasa, Lightroom, Photoshop or other?
I disagree that this is a duplicate. The differences between lightroom and picasa is not the same thing as how to get a speedy workflow. Related? yes. Duplicate? no.
Jan
4
comment Is it sensor damage? Or dust?
@Leonidas: you mean the spot did stay still? :-)
Jan
4
comment Can you help me justify my desire to purchase the Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 even though I find it rather pricey?
+1 for reading @kacalapy's question history :-). He has asked a lot about this and there is a ton of useful info in the answers :-).
Jan
4
awarded  Organizer
Jan
4
revised Can you help me justify my desire to purchase the Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 even though I find it rather pricey?
edited tags
Jan
3
comment What is the easiest way to preserve old glass plate negatives?
That's incredible! I can't wait to see the picture of the box. Did you read about this or a similar technique anywhere? If so, please post some links. If not... you are quite inventive and I'm extremely impressed :-).
Jan
3
comment When I use FX lenses on a DX camera, does the focal length or minimum aperture change?
Good explanation. I'll add another way of explaining it (for my own benefit :-) to help make it more clear? Another way of saying "just the amount of 'stuff' you can fit in the frame" changes is that the DX sensor takes the standard image you get on an FX sensor and crops for you. When you think about it that way, it becomes clear that if you were to print the (equivalent) DX and FX images on the same size paper, the DX image would look blown up because it's as though you cropped the FX image and stretched it out to the same paper size.