Incense

by Bart Arondson

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1,316 reputation
21432
bio website iki.fi/suo
location Finland
age
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen 12 hours ago

17h
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
1
comment What is the purpose of gamma correction in today's screens and how does it relate to graphics and photography?
And how it relates to photography: given the right tools, it doesn't. Gamma correction (and more generally conversions between various colour spaces) happens automatically; normal users should not be able to see it at all. It is just a technicality that computer programmers will have to be aware of, but end users do not need to know about it at all. (Unless, of course, you explicitly want to enter something like hexadecimal colour values in sRGB colour space, in which case you most likely know what you are doing.)
Sep
1
comment What is the purpose of gamma correction in today's screens and how does it relate to graphics and photography?
The main reason is simply backwards-compatibility. You want to be able to use the same computer and the same software with old CRT monitors and modern LCD monitors. Software keeps doing the same thing as what it did in the old days: it creates images in the sRGB colour space. This, of course, includes the usual gamma correction. Then old CRT monitors will use the images as is, while modern displays will basically "undo" the conversion from a linear colour space to sRGB colour space.
Aug
19
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
22
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
25
comment Human perception in color mixing
@tomp: 188 is close. On my monitor, a solid rectangle of colour (186,186,186) looks very close to what I see in your example (if I put them next to each other, it is not easy to see any seam between them). And if I use a gamma-aware scaling in a photo editing software to downscale your example by 50%, I get a solid rectangle of colour (186,186,186). — I also tried your example on a low quality laptop screen, and I get some strange greenish shade of gray. A good sign that the laptop screen is not properly calibrated.
May
25
comment Human perception in color mixing
And for reasonable colour mixing on computer, first convert sRGB to some linear colour space, mix there, and then convert back to sRGB. Roughly speaking, in a linear colour space, if you double the RGB values, you will double the amount of light that your monitor is emitting. The colour space that we usually use in computer images is sRGB and it does not have this convenient property, mainly for historical reasons (non-linear response of old CRT screens).
May
25
comment Human perception in color mixing
On my screen, the image simply looks like 50% gray until I zoom in so much that I can clearly see the individual blue and yellow pixels. But 50% gray is not the same thing as (128,128,128) in sRGB; please keep in mind en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma_correction
May
13
comment Editing previously-taken photographs—by multiple amateurs—for a consistent look
A cheap trick: convert to black and white. It makes a horrible mess of poor-quality photos look fairly consistent.
Mar
2
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
5
comment What are Canon cameras actually doing when performing a low-level format?
SD cards support the "ERASE" command which can be used to clear a large number of blocks quickly: sdcard.org/downloads/pls/simplified_specs/part1_410.pdf — see also superuser.com/questions/568041/…
Jan
26
answered Why store both JPEG and raw?
Oct
8
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
6
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
15
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
21
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
22
awarded  Yearling
Jul
13
revised Bokeh of the human eye - How does it look like & vary across apertures and individuals?
typo
Jul
13
asked Bokeh of the human eye - How does it look like & vary across apertures and individuals?