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by damned truths

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1,515 reputation
515
bio website
location Arizona
age 60
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Dec 1 at 22:37

Long time developer in lots of different fields on different hardware using different languages for different reasons.

Greatly enjoying Ruby, Sequel, Nokogiri, Rails, Sinatra/Padrino, and trying to find time and opportunities to work with Python.

I have years and years of experience with Perl too, along with Java, SQL, Pascal, C, various assembly languages and interpreted BASICs.


Dec
1
revised Why use JPEG instead of RAW?
added 280 characters in body
Nov
25
answered Why use JPEG instead of RAW?
Nov
25
comment Why use JPEG instead of RAW?
A pro photographer will most likely be shooting with a body that can buffer a lot of RAW images before filling. It only takes a few seconds for the camera to catch up.
Nov
25
comment Why use JPEG instead of RAW?
Shoot a couple hundred JPEG images and your battery will have a lot more power left than shooting the same number of RAW images. Writing big files to the card sucks up camera CPU time.
Nov
25
comment How can I keep my camera warm while photographing time lapses over a few hours of 25F / - 4C temperatures?
A lot of pros use the chemical heater packs for this.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
30
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
May
31
revised Which is faster for flashes, radio triggers or optical triggers?
edited for readability
May
30
suggested approved edit on Which is faster for flashes, radio triggers or optical triggers?
Sep
30
awarded  Yearling
Jul
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
30
awarded  Yearling
Jun
8
awarded  Constituent
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
May
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
8
awarded  Yearling
Jun
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
28
comment Why is 1:1 desirable for a macro lens?
I understand what you are saying, but it depends on the goal. My intention is grabbing the overall image and super fine detail is secondary; often fine detail isn't possible because of wind or constant movement and skittishness. A 65mm is great in a controlled situation or when you are not dealing with insects that have learned to flee at the first sign of movement, and that won't be in one place for more than a few seconds anyway, simply because that is how they eat. There have been times I've reverted to using a 200mm with an extension tube because of that skittishness.