It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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bio website mattgrum.com
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visits member for 4 years, 9 months
seen 5 hours ago

May
29
comment Is high ISO useful for photography?
@Phil When it comes to images signal-to-noise-ratio is what matters. The ISO1600 image has a better signal to noise ratio both before, and after the ISO100 image is brightened in post. Increasing the brightness of the ISO100 image was required to make it easy to see, it is merely normalisation which is used all the time in experiments and does not invalidate anything. The point is if you have a limited amount of light, the high ISO setting is very useful as it gives a cleaner final image.
May
29
awarded  Good Answer
May
28
comment How many blades does my lens' aperture diaphragm have when I get 12-pointed starbursts?
Three blade (triangular) apertures are extremely rare, you'd know if you had one from the weird bokeh!
May
28
awarded  Nice Answer
May
27
awarded  Good Answer
May
27
answered Is high ISO useful for photography?
May
27
answered Is it me or is the Lightroom's zoomed out preview inaccurate in displaying noise and color?
May
27
revised What is a good two lens “starter kit”?
added 21 characters in body
May
27
revised How to choose a lens for my first DSLR?
spelling correction in title
May
27
comment What does the f-stop printed on the lens refer to?
Yep, no idea what was going through my brain there...
May
27
revised What does the f-stop printed on the lens refer to?
deleted 5 characters in body
May
27
comment Why is there so much noise in RAW files from my new Canon 7D?
Can you post an example image? That would make it easier to answer the question.
May
26
comment Why do two different cameras using the same settings produce photos with different exposure levels?
The D700 with a larger opening does let in more light, but it also has a larger sensor so light per unit area is the same so you would expect the same exposure.
May
26
comment Why do two different cameras using the same settings produce photos with different exposure levels?
shutter speed, aperture and transmission are going to vary by a few percent, if the aperture closing varies by a stop you have huge problems. Variations in lighting due to the AC cycle is far more likely.
May
26
awarded  Enlightened
May
26
awarded  Nice Answer
May
26
comment Are “Windows Photo Viewer” rotations lossless?
@Tim an image of pure noise is by definition the worst case for jpeg (or any compression algorithm), which is why I chose it! Results on real images would look better.
May
26
comment Why do two different cameras using the same settings produce photos with different exposure levels?
@Jukka that's right, the point is the camera can map intermediate values to just about anything. I've edited the answer to be more realistic, however.
May
26
awarded  Enlightened
May
26
revised Why do two different cameras using the same settings produce photos with different exposure levels?
deleted 10 characters in body