Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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90,617 reputation
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bio website mattgrum.com
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visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 55 mins ago

47m
revised Why are Micro Four Thirds lenses so expensive compared to Canon?
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55m
answered Why are Micro Four Thirds lenses so expensive compared to Canon?
1h
comment What effects do different flash diffuser shapes have?
That image may be rendered, but not all Apple product photos are: theverge.com/2013/5/8/4311868/…
2h
comment Why use higher ISO when using a tripod and the object is static?
This is why DOF calculators are completely misleading. Depth of field depends on the distance at which you view the print/image. There's simply no way for you to know how large the photographer may have printed the image or where he intends it to be viewed from. The figures you quote assume a circle of confusion of 0.03mm, which is about five times the size of a 5D mkIII pixel! If you want to avoid a 5 pixel blur then f/4 wont cut it. In fact using the 5D pixel size as the CoC, according to the calculator to get everything from 147 feet to infinity in focus you need to stop down to... f/20!
2h
revised What effects do different flash diffuser shapes have?
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2h
answered What effects do different flash diffuser shapes have?
21h
revised Use of DOF adapters in stills photography
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22h
revised Use of DOF adapters in stills photography
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22h
answered Use of DOF adapters in stills photography
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comment Lighter section in photograph
It's called a rolling shutter artifact.
2d
revised Why do I meter under the chin with a lightmeter?
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2d
comment Why do I meter under the chin with a lightmeter?
you want to meter the darkest parts of the image to ensure you have sufficient signal in the shadows to resolve the image well this still implies the lightmeter is measuring the darkness of the shadows which is the exactly the misconception that prompted the question in the first place, and is out of line with common practice. If you wanted to ensure the shadows were within a certain range you'd just point the lightmeter dome toward the fill light/reflector. Since all of the subject skin will reflect the same amount of light you only ever need to record the incident levels.
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comment How do disposable cameras work without exposure and focus control?
possible duplicate of What is the shutter speed, aperture, and focal length of the Kodak Funsaver disposable camera?
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revised Why do I meter under the chin with a lightmeter?
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revised Why do I meter under the chin with a lightmeter?
added 385 characters in body
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comment Why do I meter under the chin with a lightmeter?
The correct way to fix problems such as shadow noise in portraiture is through extra lights / reflectors, not by ETTR (which is more for landscapes, where you can't fill light a whole mountainside). The best way to meter for portraits is to measure the incident light, not the light reflected from the subject. If only one reading was taken it was almost certainly an incident reading. I've never heard of anyone taking a single reflected reading from a shadow area in order to completely determine the exposure for a portrait!
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answered Why do I meter under the chin with a lightmeter?
Jul
21
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
18
comment How can I get perfect sharpness when shooting still art?
@user28116 Firstly "don't overexpose" is shorthand for don't push the exposure so far you run into problems of clipping and nonlinearity (in any case avoiding nonlinearity in no way requires underexposure by 2 stops!). If you start with the camera's 18% metering reading and go down two stops from there you really are going to lose quality. Finally I will "ride" that answer until the laws of physics and mathematics change to render it incorrect :)
Jul
18
comment How can I get perfect sharpness when shooting still art?
@user28116 Digital sensors are very linear with respect to incoming light vs. recorded value (unlike film) so provided you don't overexpose you'll capture the full range of details no matter where you place the exposure. Reducing the exposure, on the other hand, will absolutely increase noise in all circumstances.