Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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4,973 reputation
21944
bio website quantdec.com
location Northeastern US
age 14
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Jun 3 at 13:17

Consultant (environmental and spatial stats a specialty), expert witness, and teacher. I can be reached through (outdated but still valid) links posted on my web site.

Twitter: @WilliamAHuber // ASA-P website: http://amstatphilly.org/


Why waste time learning, when ignorance is instantaneous?

--T(iger) Hobbes.

For any complex problem there is a simple solution. And it's always wrong.

--[Mis?]attributed to H.L. Mencken by Dava Sobel, Longitude.


May
22
comment How can I get the shutter actuation count for Canon EOS 500D/550D?
It looks great, thanks. Alas, it works only on Macs... .
Nov
20
comment What happens if I press the film rewind button early?
+1 That's a feature of all manual cameras I have ever used: pressing the rewind button disengages the film advance mechanism, so pulling the lever only resets the shutter, setting you up for a double exposure. At the end of a full pull, the rewind button should re-engage. Thus, after one pull (where you will feel no film tension) you should shoot a dark image (lens cap on, high shutter speed, high f-stop) to avoid a double exposure and then advance the film again (feeling the tension as the film is moved) for the next shot.
Sep
10
comment Is there a linear relationship between shutter speed and speed of subject to freeze motion?
Thanks, @Michael, for expanding on the meaning of personal standards of sharpness. Because many (most?) photographs are rarely framed exactly right, they need cropping, so do not forget to take that into account. (I would love to have your 6000x4000 monitor, by the way. But my collection of monitors is such that there often is a 1:1 relationship between pixels in the cropped area and pixels on the monitors, so the one-pixel-of-blur standard is a meaningful, if somewhat stringent, reference for me.)
Dec
5
comment Best location for group photo near canals in Amsterdam
I have voted to close this question as too localized. If it were recast in a more general form, such as asking about criteria for selecting locations for group photos, I suspect it would have much more value to most readers.
Oct
1
comment Should I choose Hoya HD CP or Nikon CP II polarization filters?
+1 A little EV difference wouldn't sway me, but the difference between 1.7 (Marumi) and 1.1 (this Hoya) is substantial.
Aug
15
comment How can I avoid star effect on light sources on long exposure photos?
I tried it and it sort of works. The image quality is heavily degraded with small holes and the radial falloff is intense. I can't see any practical way to make truly smooth large holes. But perhaps an alternative, such as a machined disk (think of a washer) might work.
Aug
14
comment How can I avoid star effect on light sources on long exposure photos?
Clever! But where, precisely, should this mask be placed? Moreover, it's unclear that aluminum foil will work at all: even small irregularities seem likely to produce similarly irregular stars in the photo. And wouldn't a perfect pinhole produce a halo of blurred light around each point of light?
Jul
19
comment Canon 5D Mark III - problems with fluorescent light
It is a duplicate of photo.stackexchange.com/questions/4115.
May
14
comment What kind of photo effect is this?
Yes: it could be the result of years of industrialization leading to rampant, uncontrolled air pollution. (It reminds me of a good day in Mexico City in the 1980's.)
Apr
15
comment Is there a linear relationship between shutter speed and speed of subject to freeze motion?
You're right, mattdm. However, most of the variables do not need to be known. If you gauge subject speed (relative to the camera) in terms of how long it might take to cross the field of view, you arrive at an extremely simple solution: divide that time by the length of the sensor in pixels to obtain an exposure duration that will cause less than one pixel of blur. Adjust that answer to meet your personal standards of sharpness (and to match the lens's sharpness). The formula is so simple, and so little needs to be memorized (sensor size), that this works well in the field.
Apr
13
comment Auto cropping scanned document or photo
Yes, @Una, the title may suggest that, but the question seems to leave it open. Before voting (or suggesting) to close you should at least request a verification from the OP on that point. In fact, why would automatic solutions be off topic here, anyway?
Apr
7
comment What is a reasonable amount to pay for 120 b&w processing?
@Dreamager It's easy to make a contact sheet with a lightbulb and piece of glass: no enlarger is needed. You can even use a shielded candle as a safelight when developing the sheet. I have done this in campground bathrooms and in basements (at night with foil taped over the windows).
Apr
6
comment What is a reasonable amount to pay for 120 b&w processing?
I agree the question as presently formulated is off topic. But if it were changed to ask respondents to suggest less expensive alternatives to using local labs (and their pros and cons), that might survive (and perhaps collect some interesting answers).
Mar
26
comment How to become a wedding photographer?
This question is about building a portfolio; although it was asked differently, it seems to be inquiring about exactly the same topic. It has some great answers: photo.stackexchange.com/questions/7443/….
Mar
14
comment Do bigger focal lengths capture more light?
Not bad intuition. Some of it we can fix; some we have to change. You can put your response on a more rigorous footing--and explain otherwise paradoxical things like f/0.95 lenses--by recognizing that an f/1 lens is actually letting in only about (1-sqrt(3)/2)/2 = 0.067 of all the light. But the thing you must change to make this reply correct is to recognize that the amount of light admitted scales with the inverse square of the f/stop, not the f-stop itself; e.g., f/11 lets in 1/121 times as much light as f/1. This is an essential thing to know when choosing exposures in photography.
Mar
10
comment Why does blue sky gets rendered as black in black and white film photos?
+1 I simply cannot convert the sky in the color image into something like the film image without darkening the foreground beyond all recognition. This convinces me that Stan is right: the sky received special attention during printing.
Mar
10
comment Why does blue sky gets rendered as black in black and white film photos?
On both cameras or just one of them?
Mar
10
comment Why does blue sky gets rendered as black in black and white film photos?
Stan, a spectral sensitivity plot for this film is available at ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/20114271111491224.pdf. It is instructive to compare it to a daylight sky spectrum (e.g., en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Spectrum_of_blue_sky.png). In brief, this film has flat sensitivity from deep blue through red-orange and no sensitivity to reds. This photo indeed looks like it was shot with a Wratten 25 or 29, but apparently it wasn't filtered at all.
Mar
10
comment Why does blue sky gets rendered as black in black and white film photos?
Do you keep any UV or haze filters on either lens?
Mar
8
comment How do I formulate an estimate for photographing a private school's 180+ K-5th graders and their 30+ faculty and staff?
Thank you, Stan, for emphasizing that point.