Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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51,848 reputation
799235
bio website jonrista.com
location Aurora, CO
age 34
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 2 hours ago

I am a relatively new photographer, having been at if for only a few years. I chose Canon gear when I finally took the plunge into DSLR. I am an avid hobbyist now, and love everything about photography, from the gear, to the science, to the art. I spent years reading about the technology and photography theory, so I am very well versed in the technical aspects of photography. My artistic skills are moderate, but improving. You can see my work @ the following sites:

My interests lie primarily in nature photography:

  • Birds
    • Songbird Setups
    • Shore Birds & Waders
    • Raptors
    • All others
  • Astrophotography
    • Moon
    • Wide Field
    • Deep Sky
  • Landscapes
  • Wildlife
  • Floral Macro
  • Insect Macro
  • Abstract

I currently use the following gear:

  • Cameras
    • Canon EOS 7D
    • Canon EOS 450D (Rebel XSi)
  • Lenses
    • EF 16-35 f/2.8 USM L Wide
    • EF 50mm f/1.4 USM
    • EF 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro
    • EF 100-400mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM L Zoom
    • EF 600mm f/4 L IS II
    • Canon EF 1.4x TC III
    • Kenko 1.4x Teleplus Pro 300 DGX
    • Periodic Rentals:
      • EF 300mm f/2.8 L IS II
      • EF 500mm f/4 L IS II
      • Canon EF 2x TC III
  • Filters
    • Lee Foundation Kit (x2) + Tandem Adapter
    • Lee .3/.6 ND
    • Lee .3/.6/.9 Soft Grad ND
    • Lee .3/.6/.9 Hard Grad ND
    • Lee CPL
  • Tripod
    • Gitzo Systematic GT3532LS 3S. Series 3 Tripod
    • Jobu Pro 2 Gimbal
    • Gitzo Mountaineer GT0541 4S. Series.0 Tripod
    • Gitzo GH1780QR Series.1 Mag. Center Ball Head

Apr
5
comment How can I get my Canon camera or body replaced warranty for battery drain, when Canon says it is fine?
I have to second laurence here, a lot of battery grips have an independent power switch. It's possible the grip is on while the camera is off, and if you put the camera down in such a way that a button remains pressed, that could persistently activate some of the electronics, and drain the battery. It may also be that a button is stuck down while the grip is on. The reason you might get a day at one time, then weeks another, could simply be that both the grip and the body were turned off.
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
@Morpho: I agree, crop factor is not technically part of magnification. I believe I was clear enough in my description of framing, however, that I did not explain anything inaccurately regarding reproduction ratio within the image circle. If you FRAME your macro subjects the same with the same macro lens on FF and APS-C, the APS-C would technically not be reproduced 1:1. That is exactly because of what you said, not in contrast to it.
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
...technically speaking, that would not be true, since the reproduced image of your real-life subject is SMALLER than in real life, not the same size or larger. It would only be macro when considering print size, however print size is arbitrary, where as sensor reproduction ratio (assuming FF) is fixed (and therefor the only logical proper interpretation of an X:Y ratio printed on a lens). When your lens magnification/reproduction ratio gets to around 1:3 or more, it rapidly becomes very difficult to reproduce a life-sized image, even in print, unless you are printing extremely large.
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
Your wikipedia article even backs this up: The ratio of the subject size on the film plane (or sensor plane) to the actual subject size is known as the reproduction ratio. Likewise, a macro lens is classically a lens capable of reproduction ratios greater than 1:1, although it often refers to any lens with a large reproduction ratio, despite rarely exceeding 1:1. Classically, technically, the 1:1 designation used on macro lenses has to do with the reproduction ratio of a real life subject relative to the sensor. Colloquially, some people also consider 1:2 lenses to be "macro", however...
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
@Guffa: I strongly dispute whoever wrote that Wikipedia page, then. I've had too many conversations about macro photography to count since I first started photography. I have NEVER heard of anyone referring to print or screen magnification when talking about the magnification ratio of a lens. Magnification ratios of lenses has always referred to the reproduction size on the sensor. Every lens has a magnification ratio, commonly around 1:4 - 1:10...that magnification is always relative to the sensor. When Canon puts 1:1 on their lens, that SPECIFICALLY means relative to the sensor.
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
...how you framed your subject. If you use a 1:1 macro lens meant for FF on an APS-C sensor, for example, it would really only achieve 1:1 magnification if you used it at the MFD...in which case your subject might be cropped a bit relative to the exact same usage with a FF sensor. If you pull the lens back a bit on a cropped sensor, in order to fully frame your subject (say a snail or an insect), then your now below the 1:1 magnification level, and you are no longer "macro".
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
Based on the raw definition of the term macro, I think that means any lens that offers at least 1:1 magnification of your subject ON THE SENSOR would qualify for the term. That means lenses with 2:1, 3:1, 5:1, 10:1, etc. magnification factors would all qualify. The 1:1 designation is the minimum, since at that magnification your subject, ON THE SENSOR, is the same size as in real life (enlarged onto a computer screen or in print, it would be much larger than in real life). If your using a FF lens on a crop sensor, then the 1:1 designation is a bit dubious...it would really depend on exactly...
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
@Guffa: I hadn't ever heard that the debate involved the final screen/printout size. I do believe there is some debate about whether 1:1 only refers to magnification with a FF (36x24mm) sensor, or whether it also means an APS-C sensor. In the case of the Canon 100mm f/2.8 lens, it's an EF lens, so the 1:1 designation would probably require a FF sensor to be true. The term macro generally means "large" or "great", usually in reference to something as large as or larger than "in real life", in contrast with micro which means smaller than in real life.
Mar
29
comment Specs to look for in my first camera
It isn't the brand affinity (or hate, as it is) that ticked me off about this post. It was the highly anecdotal form, hearsay opinion and the perpetuation of useless information. I'm ok with people voicing their brand affinities, we all have them, but they should at least be based in fact, not pure fabrication.
Mar
27
comment Specs to look for in my first camera
Canon isn't the world's top photography equipment manufacturer for no reason. Their equipment sells, and sells well, for a reason...and simply being cheap and inferior is NOT the reason.
Mar
27
comment Specs to look for in my first camera
...of image quality, or what makes a camera "pro" grade. Canon's lenses are second to none, and regarded as the highest quality in the industry by many. The 1D X is revered as one of the most professional DSLR bodies ever made, offering exceptional, and truly (by name and design) professional features for sports, journalist, wildlife & bird, and wedding photographers who demand the highest quality from their equipment. Given the claims you have made, you really need to back them up with reliable, verifiable sources, otherwise, it's all just opinion and anecdotes, and wild ones at that.
Mar
27
comment Specs to look for in my first camera
@Photography Enthusiast: First, I certainly hope you are not recommending anyone use a cannon for their photography. I think that would be quite dangerous. ;) As for the rest, you are making some rather wild and anecdotal claims about Canon's products and their use by professionals. I would go so far as to say a majority of Canon camera users who own xD level (single digit) bodies ARE professionals...and that's a LOT of professionals right there. Canon does not, by any means, compromise on quality in any respect. Sensors are not the end-all, be-all...
Mar
17
comment What are these strange lines on images from my Fujifilm FinePix F850EXR?
I doubt it's the CFA. That is fabricated directly into the sensor, it isn't some additional separate filter structure that sits on top of the sensor. If anything, this looks like the low pass filter, which is part of the IR/OLPF/UV filter stack, may have become misaligned. It's probably fixable, but I wouldn't expect it to be cheap.
Mar
15
comment Why does my Canon 7D get blurry pictures with a 70-200mm f/2.8 IS (series 1)?
Sure, if the lens actually had some kind of issue like that, CDAF might be able to help. It's also possible that CDAF might not function properly. Either way, I wouldn't say that using CDAF is guaranteed to tell you whether you have an issue or not. There are plenty of times when CDAF doesn't succeed in getting focus at all...it's only close to 100% accurate if it actually manages to lock. Anyway, I get it, but I don't think that is what the question, now a year old, was asking in the first place. So it's a moot point to debate it further here.
Mar
15
comment Why does my Canon 7D get blurry pictures with a 70-200mm f/2.8 IS (series 1)?
Maybe. What you see on live view is a form of JPEG encoding...and depending on how large the focus error might be, you may or may not be able to tell with just live view. I still think that using something like Reikan FoCal or LensAlign would still be best to determine if there is an actual error in the lens or if it just needed microadjustment. It is practically impossible to tell a difference, visually, with AFMA between 10-12 steps with live view. That's more than half the range of AFMA, but focus error is usually very, very slight.
Mar
14
comment Why does my Canon 7D get blurry pictures with a 70-200mm f/2.8 IS (series 1)?
AFMA isn't about the lens, it's about the lens+camera combo, and it specifically adjusts PDAF behavior. Testing CDAF won't really tell you anything about whether you need to AFMA, because it's testing the wrong AF system. All that AFMA does is set a digital shift value that the cameras AF drive firmware uses to direct the lens when focusing. If you were off by -10 AFMA steps, when the camera tells the lens to focus, it tells it to focus by the amount the PDAF sensor detected, minus the AFMA adjustment.
Mar
11
comment What is bokeh, exactly?
+1! As always, great answer and wonderful diagram!
Mar
2
comment Does this appear correct? Comparison of PSD & TIFF file sizes when using adjustment layers.
My guess is that Adobe is able to optimize saving adjustment layers in PSD when the mask has not been modified. That is not possible with TIFF, as TIFF is a general purpose format that must be compatible with other programs, where as PSD is a format specific to Photoshop. There is still going to be important metadata and state data that has to be saved for each adjustment layer, but the layer itself probably does not require the mask to be saved in photoshop unless it has been modified.
Mar
2
comment Why do my tiff files balloon in size when saved with 1 adjustment layer?
Adjustment layers all have a mask. The mask by default is fully white, however it is the same dimensions and bit depth as the rest of the image. So in addition to the "final result" image that is saved, you have the original layer as well as the adjustment layers mask. On top of the bitmap data, you have all the various photoshop active state and adjustment layer settings that need to be saved as well, which would account for the additional overhead.
Feb
27
comment Why doesn't my fisheye adapter gives fisheye distorsion on my APS-C DSLR?
Since you are using an adapter ring to adapt the fisheye (from I presume 62mm) to the lens (42mm), you are effectively cutting out a LOT of the highly oblique angle light. A fisheye lens is designed to gather rays of light from up to 180°, and focus those onto the sensor. Since you are downgrading your fisheye element to a much smaller diameter, any part of the fisheye that extends beyond the filter ring of your lens is effectively wasted FoV. You should be using a fisheye element that is specifically designed for 42mm.