Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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53,619 reputation
7104243
bio website jonrista.com
location Aurora, CO
age 34
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen 2 days ago

I am a relatively new photographer, having been at if for only a few years. I chose Canon gear when I finally took the plunge into DSLR. I am an avid hobbyist now, and love everything about photography, from the gear, to the science, to the art. I spent years reading about the technology and photography theory, so I am very well versed in the technical aspects of photography. My artistic skills are moderate, but improving. You can see my work @ the following sites:

My interests lie primarily in nature photography:

  • Birds
    • Songbird Setups
    • Shore Birds & Waders
    • Raptors
    • All others
  • Astrophotography
    • Moon
    • Wide Field
    • Deep Sky
  • Landscapes
  • Wildlife
  • Floral Macro
  • Insect Macro
  • Abstract

I currently use the following gear:

  • Cameras
    • Canon EOS 7D
    • Canon EOS 450D (Rebel XSi)
  • Lenses
    • EF 16-35 f/2.8 USM L Wide
    • EF 50mm f/1.4 USM
    • EF 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro
    • EF 100-400mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM L Zoom
    • EF 600mm f/4 L IS II
    • Canon EF 1.4x TC III
    • Kenko 1.4x Teleplus Pro 300 DGX
    • Periodic Rentals:
      • EF 300mm f/2.8 L IS II
      • EF 500mm f/4 L IS II
      • Canon EF 2x TC III
  • Filters
    • Lee Foundation Kit (x2) + Tandem Adapter
    • Lee .3/.6 ND
    • Lee .3/.6/.9 Soft Grad ND
    • Lee .3/.6/.9 Hard Grad ND
    • Lee CPL
  • Tripod
    • Gitzo Systematic GT3532LS 3S. Series 3 Tripod
    • Jobu Pro 2 Gimbal
    • Gitzo Mountaineer GT0541 4S. Series.0 Tripod
    • Gitzo GH1780QR Series.1 Mag. Center Ball Head

May
17
reviewed Leave Open I'm having issues with flash in DF.
May
17
reviewed Close What personal safety precautions do I need to take while traveling with a camera in Scandinavia?
May
16
awarded  white-balance
May
6
comment Grainy/low quality pictures - how to stop?
@MysMelody: Well, regardless of which camera you are using, I think my point still applies. If you really want truly better IQ, a better camera is the logical place to go. ;)
May
4
reviewed No Action Needed Grainy/low quality pictures - how to stop?
May
4
comment Grainy/low quality pictures - how to stop?
Just to throw this out there...to take better pictures, you really probably want a better camera. ;) A cheap low end camera can only do so much. If you NEED to zoom in, then you NEED ISO 1600, it's kind of as simple as that. Better cameras have larger sensors, and gather more light, so even at higher ISO settings they are less noisy. You can push your IXUS compact camera as far as you want, but once you push it beyond the limit's of what it's capable of, you'll always be needing something better.
May
2
answered External power supply for Canon 600ex-rt that is not a battery pack
May
2
revised What is the Base ISO of a Canon 5D MK III?
Added info about ETTR
May
2
answered What is the Base ISO of a Canon 5D MK III?
Apr
25
comment What is tactile photography? How can I start with it?
When answering a question that has already been answered well, it is really best to provide a full answer rich with information, especially information that may not be present in other answers. One-liners are generally frowned upon, and are bound to get flagged, and probably eventually deleted in the long run, so take some real time to answer when answering questions that already have one or more answers, so that your time is spent in value.
Apr
23
revised What process was used to make this glass plate?
deleted 3350 characters in body
Apr
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
15
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
8
reviewed Edit suggested edit on How can I find duplicate photos in a very large pool of data (tens to hundreds of gigs)?
Apr
8
revised How can I find duplicate photos in a very large pool of data (tens to hundreds of gigs)?
improved title for SEO performance
Apr
5
comment How can I get my Canon camera or body replaced warranty for battery drain, when Canon says it is fine?
I have to second laurence here, a lot of battery grips have an independent power switch. It's possible the grip is on while the camera is off, and if you put the camera down in such a way that a button remains pressed, that could persistently activate some of the electronics, and drain the battery. It may also be that a button is stuck down while the grip is on. The reason you might get a day at one time, then weeks another, could simply be that both the grip and the body were turned off.
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
@Morpho: I agree, crop factor is not technically part of magnification. I believe I was clear enough in my description of framing, however, that I did not explain anything inaccurately regarding reproduction ratio within the image circle. If you FRAME your macro subjects the same with the same macro lens on FF and APS-C, the APS-C would technically not be reproduced 1:1. That is exactly because of what you said, not in contrast to it.
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
...technically speaking, that would not be true, since the reproduced image of your real-life subject is SMALLER than in real life, not the same size or larger. It would only be macro when considering print size, however print size is arbitrary, where as sensor reproduction ratio (assuming FF) is fixed (and therefor the only logical proper interpretation of an X:Y ratio printed on a lens). When your lens magnification/reproduction ratio gets to around 1:3 or more, it rapidly becomes very difficult to reproduce a life-sized image, even in print, unless you are printing extremely large.
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
Your wikipedia article even backs this up: The ratio of the subject size on the film plane (or sensor plane) to the actual subject size is known as the reproduction ratio. Likewise, a macro lens is classically a lens capable of reproduction ratios greater than 1:1, although it often refers to any lens with a large reproduction ratio, despite rarely exceeding 1:1. Classically, technically, the 1:1 designation used on macro lenses has to do with the reproduction ratio of a real life subject relative to the sensor. Colloquially, some people also consider 1:2 lenses to be "macro", however...
Apr
1
comment What is the name for the type of photography where the subject is close-up?
@Guffa: I strongly dispute whoever wrote that Wikipedia page, then. I've had too many conversations about macro photography to count since I first started photography. I have NEVER heard of anyone referring to print or screen magnification when talking about the magnification ratio of a lens. Magnification ratios of lenses has always referred to the reproduction size on the sensor. Every lens has a magnification ratio, commonly around 1:4 - 1:10...that magnification is always relative to the sensor. When Canon puts 1:1 on their lens, that SPECIFICALLY means relative to the sensor.