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54,713 reputation
8107250
bio website jonrista.com
location Aurora, CO
age 35
visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen 2 days ago

I am a relatively new photographer, having been at if for only a few years. I chose Canon gear when I finally took the plunge into DSLR. I am an avid hobbyist now, and love everything about photography, from the gear, to the science, to the art. I spent years reading about the technology and photography theory, so I am very well versed in the technical aspects of photography. My artistic skills are moderate, but improving. You can see my work @ the following sites:

My interests lie primarily in nature photography:

  • Birds
    • Songbird Setups
    • Shore Birds & Waders
    • Raptors
    • All others
  • Astrophotography
    • Moon
    • Wide Field
    • Deep Sky
  • Landscapes
  • Wildlife
  • Floral Macro
  • Insect Macro
  • Abstract

I currently use the following gear:

  • Cameras
    • Canon EOS 7D
    • Canon EOS 450D (Rebel XSi)
  • Lenses
    • EF 16-35 f/2.8 USM L Wide
    • EF 50mm f/1.4 USM
    • EF 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro
    • EF 100-400mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM L Zoom
    • EF 600mm f/4 L IS II
    • Canon EF 1.4x TC III
    • Kenko 1.4x Teleplus Pro 300 DGX
    • Periodic Rentals:
      • EF 300mm f/2.8 L IS II
      • EF 500mm f/4 L IS II
      • Canon EF 2x TC III
  • Filters
    • Lee Foundation Kit (x2) + Tandem Adapter
    • Lee .3/.6 ND
    • Lee .3/.6/.9 Soft Grad ND
    • Lee .3/.6/.9 Hard Grad ND
    • Lee CPL
  • Tripod
    • Gitzo Systematic GT3532LS 3S. Series 3 Tripod
    • Jobu Pro 2 Gimbal
    • Gitzo Mountaineer GT0541 4S. Series.0 Tripod
    • Gitzo GH1780QR Series.1 Mag. Center Ball Head

Sep
18
comment What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
@Alan: I understand what your saying, however despite the fact that there are "wider" printers that cost a ton and are usually used by professional labs, my point is that they are not necessarily higher quality. As an example, the upper end of the "consumer/home pro" lines from Epson and Canon tend to offer higher maximum quality than the top of the line wide format commercial printers. A Canon iPF8300 costing $6000 has a lot of powerful features for commercial entities, but has a maximum DPI of 2400x1200. It uses Lucia Pigment Ink.
Sep
17
comment What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
Not sure about the "Quality vs cost" comment. I think part of the reason many photographers make their own prints is to eek every las ounce of quality that they can out of a print. (Many have wide-format printers capable of wide gamut, canvas and roll printing, etc., and many do their own print calibration, often with very precise equipment, and the cost is not very high.) Sometimes, you get what you get with a lab, since you don't control all the factors, and quality, while it may be good, may also not necessarily be the best it could be.
Sep
17
comment What are non-destructive edits and do they exist?
Its all about interpretation. RAW is just information about reality that has substance but no real form, and how we interpret that information, what form we give it, determines how realistic and true-to-life the final shot looks.
Sep
17
comment What are non-destructive edits and do they exist?
I don't recall stating that RAW itself is a destructive representation of reality. Perhaps a better way to put it is RAW is a "limited" representation of reality, although considerably less limited than many representations (i.e. JPEG, or even Film). I do agree that as photographers, we should do what we can to preserve as much about our scene as we can. However, to preserve the "most" with RAW, that usually means taking a shot that does not "look correct" initially, fundamentally requiring some post-processing to interpret the information we have captured as realistically as possible.
Sep
17
awarded  Tag Editor
Sep
17
revised aperture wiki description
added 60 characters in body
Sep
17
awarded  Electorate
Sep
17
comment Is the kit lens focal length specified for APS-C or FF?
I don't think we should use the 'e' notation. Any random reader who comes here from google or bing is not going to know what that means. Its a hyper-niche notation only used here on our site.
Sep
17
comment What is meant by the “native ISO” when talking about DSLRs?
I have to agree. The more I learn about photography gear, the more I realize how little all the micro-measurements matter. Distortion, slight vignetting, base/native ISO, etc. are all pretty meaningless in the real world. Those that do have a visible effect can usually be corrected in post-processing these days, often automatically with the advent of lens profiles for various software. They may matter for scientific purposes, but its unlikely any scientific project would use any commercial grade equipment.
Sep
16
revised What are non-destructive edits and do they exist?
deleted 98 characters in body
Sep
16
comment How do I correct white balance in JPEG images?
Have you tried photo filter adjustment layers in photoshop? They simulate actual warming and cooling filters.
Sep
16
answered What are non-destructive edits and do they exist?
Sep
16
comment Method to photograph a wide/long wall from a near distance and create a panoramic view of it
Take a look at the EF 50 f/1.2 L. Its peak performance is between f/1.2 and f/2.8, and if falls off after that. It has some of the most superb wide-open performance of any f/1.2 lens I've ever used. There is obviously some vignetting, however that is very easy to manage in post processing, especially with software that supports lens profiles. The vignetting of a wide lens can easily be eliminated before stitching. I do agree though that in general, wide lenses suffer from softness and vignetting which can make them less useful at max aperture.
Sep
16
accepted Why are photographic gels called “gels”?
Sep
16
comment Why are photographic gels called “gels”?
Thanks Chuqui. At least I wasn't totally out of my mind. (I'm out of votes for the day, so as soon as I am able to up vote, I will. ;)
Sep
16
comment Method to photograph a wide/long wall from a near distance and create a panoramic view of it
Regarding the math, I think its important for photographers to understand a little bit of it, given that what we do all the time is work with angles and distances and widths. Thats why I try to throw out a little trig every now and then, with a clear explanation of how it works, so people can have more knowledge to draw on in the field.
Sep
16
comment Method to photograph a wide/long wall from a near distance and create a panoramic view of it
Softness at wide apertures is largely dependent upon build quality. Cheaper lenses do tend to get soft, however there are some fantastic fast lenses, f/1.2 and f/1.4 in the Canon L series line of lenses, that are relatively very sharp wide open. Also, an f/1.4 or f/1.2 lens allows you to stop down a bit to get better sharpness and still have a fast aperture, vs. a slower lens which wouldn't give you that leeway. A tripod is essential, however you run the risk of someone passing through your shot if you expose longer, and longer shots mean more time to complete the whole sequence.
Sep
16
asked Why are photographic gels called “gels”?
Sep
16
answered How much metadata do you add to your photos?
Sep
16
revised Method to photograph a wide/long wall from a near distance and create a panoramic view of it
added 55 characters in body