Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

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51,848 reputation
799235
bio website jonrista.com
location Aurora, CO
age 34
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 12 hours ago

I am a relatively new photographer, having been at if for only a few years. I chose Canon gear when I finally took the plunge into DSLR. I am an avid hobbyist now, and love everything about photography, from the gear, to the science, to the art. I spent years reading about the technology and photography theory, so I am very well versed in the technical aspects of photography. My artistic skills are moderate, but improving. You can see my work @ the following sites:

My interests lie primarily in nature photography:

  • Birds
    • Songbird Setups
    • Shore Birds & Waders
    • Raptors
    • All others
  • Astrophotography
    • Moon
    • Wide Field
    • Deep Sky
  • Landscapes
  • Wildlife
  • Floral Macro
  • Insect Macro
  • Abstract

I currently use the following gear:

  • Cameras
    • Canon EOS 7D
    • Canon EOS 450D (Rebel XSi)
  • Lenses
    • EF 16-35 f/2.8 USM L Wide
    • EF 50mm f/1.4 USM
    • EF 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro
    • EF 100-400mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM L Zoom
    • EF 600mm f/4 L IS II
    • Canon EF 1.4x TC III
    • Kenko 1.4x Teleplus Pro 300 DGX
    • Periodic Rentals:
      • EF 300mm f/2.8 L IS II
      • EF 500mm f/4 L IS II
      • Canon EF 2x TC III
  • Filters
    • Lee Foundation Kit (x2) + Tandem Adapter
    • Lee .3/.6 ND
    • Lee .3/.6/.9 Soft Grad ND
    • Lee .3/.6/.9 Hard Grad ND
    • Lee CPL
  • Tripod
    • Gitzo Systematic GT3532LS 3S. Series 3 Tripod
    • Jobu Pro 2 Gimbal
    • Gitzo Mountaineer GT0541 4S. Series.0 Tripod
    • Gitzo GH1780QR Series.1 Mag. Center Ball Head

Sep
2
comment What is Nikon's equivalent to the Canon L series EF 24-70 2.8?
My comments were less about nikon vs. canon, and more about saving Sam some money. He didn't mention the "EF-S only, want Full Frame" before, and I would hate to see someone "switch" and incur the cost of all new gear "just for the sake of it".
Sep
2
comment What is Nikon's equivalent to the Canon L series EF 24-70 2.8?
Be ware that Ken Rockwell is Nikon's poster boy. The relative differences between the Nikon 24-70 and the Canon 24-70 are minuscule at best, and Canon's 24-70 is still one of, if not the, best zoom lens Canon offers. The images from it are just as tack sharp as from the Nikon.
Sep
2
wiki created aperture description
Sep
2
comment What is Nikon's equivalent to the Canon L series EF 24-70 2.8?
Just out of curiosity, why would you sell all your gear and move to Nikon? Both brands offer pretty much identical quality and features across the board. If you are already invested in one brand, the benefits of jumping ship and completely switching are practically nil...If you have Canon, and need the 24-70 2.8, I would just get it. Its a fantastic lens.
Sep
1
comment How is ISO implemented in digital cameras?
On Canon cameras, they have "expanded" ISO settings (H) and (L). I thought it was only the expanded settings that were digitally amplified, and that all of the "normal" ISO settings were done with the analog amplifier. That would mean that most of the higher end (and newer) Canons have a real ISO range up to 3200 at least, if not more. I think the 1D Mk IV has a normal ISO range from 100-12800, with 50, 25600, 51200, 102400 being the digitally enhanced ones. Is that not actually the case?
Sep
1
comment How to import photos and metadata from Flickr to Lightroom?
I would give the LR3 Flickr services a whirl. They are pretty nice, and support metadata sync.
Sep
1
comment What is Universal White Balance (UniWB)?
Out of curiosity, does this affect a normal tone-only histogram (B/W histogram)? Or does it only affect a color histogram? I switched to using the B/W histogram a few months ago, as it seemed to be a little more accurate.
Sep
1
revised How and why do you use an image histogram?
added 2898 characters in body
Aug
31
comment How and why do you use an image histogram?
@BBishof: I'll see if I can clarify the reasons why each bit of information can be gleaned from a histogram. There is specific theory behind how a histogram works.
Aug
31
comment What makes someone a good photographer?
@John: I've been exactly like your friend. I knew a lot about the technology and theory before I ever got a DSLR. And in recent months, I've been reading a lot about MTF, lp/mm, yadda yadda. Yugh. These days, I tend to keep technology and theory out of my mind unless I'm writing something here on Photo.se. When I'm out and about, I try to focus on lighting and composition...my two weak points. I still get tangled up in theory every so often, but I'm beginning to get a better sense of the art now.
Aug
31
comment What makes someone a good photographer?
@matt: Yes...its kind of our curse. I love programming, but it always gets in the way of my art, dammit! :P
Aug
31
revised How do you find out the “sweet spot” of a lens?
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Aug
31
comment What does it mean if the main peak of my Histogram is beyond the top of the chart?
Light is light...it simply illuminates, so it shouldn't be making your images more noisy by adding it, even if it is "warmer" than you would like. On the contrary, increasing the illumination of a scene allows you to shift your histogram to the right, which should help you reduce noise. For one, you utilize more of the sensor's dynamic range, particularly highlights, and two, you can often reduce the ISO setting. In general, adding light to a scene should never "kill" detail, only make that detail easier to capture. Now, angle is important, as it allows you to create useful shadows.
Aug
31
revised How do you find out the “sweet spot” of a lens?
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Aug
31
comment What does it mean if the main peak of my Histogram is beyond the top of the chart?
White balance can be adjusted, so the yellow light (probably incandescent) can be corrected. Digital cameras can do some correction...the "auto" white balance setting should take care of a lot of that. If the camera is insufficient at correcting color casts, post-processing software like Lightroom can usually correct it. The two controls, color temperature and tint, generally cover the whole spectrum. Just use the "neutral balance selector" tool, and click on an area that was a neutral white or gray in reality. Lightroom should then automatically remove any orange cast for you.
Aug
31
comment How do you find out the “sweet spot” of a lens?
Sorry, seems the old photo.se room was closed. This one should work: chat.meta.stackoverflow.com/rooms/211/photo-se
Aug
31
comment How do you find out the “sweet spot” of a lens?
I think long conversations like this are best left to StackExchange chat. Makes these threads rather unruly. I would like to continue the discussion, with visual examples if you have any. I think you make an interesting point, but I'm not certain I'm entirely convinced that a new super high density 18mp sensor will always be better than an older lower density 16mp sensor, for example. I'll be logged in here for the next several days: chat.meta.stackoverflow.com/rooms/154/photo
Aug
31
revised How do you find out the “sweet spot” of a lens?
added 19 characters in body
Aug
31
comment What does it mean if the main peak of my Histogram is beyond the top of the chart?
If you encounter a similar scenario, I would try to find a way to light the scene better. If you have to grab a nearby lamp and rip off the shade to illuminate the scene, I would (I actually do that myself, particularly when trying to photograph insects indoors.) Best to avoid flash with insects (unless you have the right kind or a diffuser.) You could just mess with exposure, however the ultimate end result is most likely to be that you brighten everything, but end up with the same histogram...and same low contrast...only more to the right. Light is your best friend.
Aug
30
comment What does it mean if the main peak of my Histogram is beyond the top of the chart?
Based on your shot, it looks quite under exposed. The fact that the bulk of your tones are bunched up in one fairly narrow spike is also an indication of why your image appears to have such low contrast. I would expect that there be a spike around the highlights area, as about 3/4 of the scene is "white", but I would also expect that other tones would be more exposed.