Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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53,719 reputation
7106243
bio website jonrista.com
location Aurora, CO
age 34
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Aug 27 at 3:56

I am a relatively new photographer, having been at if for only a few years. I chose Canon gear when I finally took the plunge into DSLR. I am an avid hobbyist now, and love everything about photography, from the gear, to the science, to the art. I spent years reading about the technology and photography theory, so I am very well versed in the technical aspects of photography. My artistic skills are moderate, but improving. You can see my work @ the following sites:

My interests lie primarily in nature photography:

  • Birds
    • Songbird Setups
    • Shore Birds & Waders
    • Raptors
    • All others
  • Astrophotography
    • Moon
    • Wide Field
    • Deep Sky
  • Landscapes
  • Wildlife
  • Floral Macro
  • Insect Macro
  • Abstract

I currently use the following gear:

  • Cameras
    • Canon EOS 7D
    • Canon EOS 450D (Rebel XSi)
  • Lenses
    • EF 16-35 f/2.8 USM L Wide
    • EF 50mm f/1.4 USM
    • EF 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro
    • EF 100-400mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM L Zoom
    • EF 600mm f/4 L IS II
    • Canon EF 1.4x TC III
    • Kenko 1.4x Teleplus Pro 300 DGX
    • Periodic Rentals:
      • EF 300mm f/2.8 L IS II
      • EF 500mm f/4 L IS II
      • Canon EF 2x TC III
  • Filters
    • Lee Foundation Kit (x2) + Tandem Adapter
    • Lee .3/.6 ND
    • Lee .3/.6/.9 Soft Grad ND
    • Lee .3/.6/.9 Hard Grad ND
    • Lee CPL
  • Tripod
    • Gitzo Systematic GT3532LS 3S. Series 3 Tripod
    • Jobu Pro 2 Gimbal
    • Gitzo Mountaineer GT0541 4S. Series.0 Tripod
    • Gitzo GH1780QR Series.1 Mag. Center Ball Head

Sep
19
comment Is Canon EF 17-200 f/4L USM a good enough lens for Canon 7d?
Rather confusing question. I think there is a Sigma 17-200, and a Canon 18-200, but not a Canon 17-200.
Sep
19
comment With all other things equal, in a DSLR, will a larger sensor produce a sharper image?
++ Excellent answer.
Sep
19
comment What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
Yeah, the PIXMA Pro9000 is a great printer too, and cheaper to run as it uses dye inks, rather than pigment (almost half the cost). I kind of got trapped by all the "pigment" hype, but after some recent research, it seems dye inks have great longevity, and tend to produce more vibrant results than pigments. Dye particles are also a lot smaller, so the tonal range with the Pro9000 should be better than the Pro9500. When it comes to fine art papers, I think the pigment is a more stable colorant, but on luster/semigloss or gloss papers, nothing beats dye.
Sep
19
accepted MacHood Cinema Display Hood in US?
Sep
19
comment Do electric ink/electronic paper “digital” picture frames exist?
Sadly, this is pretty much the correct answer. Hopefully it will change in the future...I would LOVE an epaper picture frame capable of 24bit color.
Sep
19
accepted Do electric ink/electronic paper “digital” picture frames exist?
Sep
19
comment Where can I buy sets of Lee ND filters?
Accepted, since Vistek seems to have EVERYTHING, which is pretty nice. Even though I got the filters elsewhere.
Sep
19
accepted Where can I buy sets of Lee ND filters?
Sep
19
comment Why are photographic gels called “gels”?
@Reid: Ha! Thanks. :)
Sep
19
comment What are the most notable differences between Canon and Nikon lenses?
Couldn't agree more with Alan. Outside of using a loupe to examine perfectly calibrated prints under ideal lighting, the differences between gear and brands is minimal at best, and moot in the general sense. What mattes more is getting out and using the gear you have. ;)
Sep
19
comment What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
Generally speaking, professional quality printers "start" at 13x19", and go up from there. I have an iP4500 as a general purpose and backup photo printer. It cost about $130, and an equivalent today is probably less. It prints some great photos itself, and with a calibration device, it could probably print professional grade. It is a dye printer, so it actually has a really high DPI, and looks great. It only has the basic CMYK ink, thus has a smaller gamut, but most of the time that isn't a problem. I tend to print most of my 4x6"-8x10" stuff on it, leaving the larger formats to the 9500.
Sep
18
comment What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
Aye, I've started purchasing third-party papers. I actually should have pictured some. I am partial to Hahnemuhle, which is what the Canon Fine Art papers are anyway. The true stuff is about as expensive, but there are far more options directly from Hahnemuhle. I also like Museo DFA and Breathing Color, they have some nice fine art papers as well. I've never seen Red River, I'll have to look into them. I'm becoming a bit of a paper snob, but its amazing the variety of tone and texture available. This Spyder3Studio was definitely worth the $500...I'll be able to print on anything now.
Sep
18
comment Is Canon EF 17-200 f/4L USM a good enough lens for Canon 7d?
What kind of photography do you intend to use it for?
Sep
18
revised What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
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Sep
18
revised What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
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Sep
18
comment What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
@Alan: T/Y! :-)
Sep
18
comment What are non-destructive edits and do they exist?
I'm not sure that either of those are true. Due to the algorithms involved for most applications, such as Photoshop, Lightroom, Aperture, and similar tools, neither of those edits would be lossless. Scaling is never 100% perfect nearest-neighbor, there is always some interpolation simply due to how the algorithms work (nearest-neighbor is still a sampling algorithm). Even rotation incurs resampling in most image editing tools, so there also loss when rotating. Outside of writing ones own tools that use purposely non-destructive algorithms, I wouldn't bet on those two being lossless.
Sep
18
comment What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
@Alan: Gocha. I would call it "Cost/Quality Ratio" or "Cost to Quality Ratio" then, I think that would be a bit clearer.
Sep
18
answered What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
Sep
18
comment What are the pros and cons of lab prints versus using a printer?
A Canon Pro9500 II, costing $700, has far fewer features, but has a maximum DPI of 4800x2400. It also uses Lucia Ink. From an image quality perspective, the higher DPI of the Pro9500 allows for more tonal range and smoother gradients than the imagePrograph. While you can definitely save yourself $700 (or $1200 if you want to have perfectly calibrated prints), and spend less per print with a lab, there really aren't any quality differences. There may be a quality bonus if you print images yourself, but you have to amortize the cost of the gear over its lifetime, so cost is higher at home.