Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
by octopus                

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Oct
28
comment What size lens is recommended for flying bird photography?
@chuqui: Thats basically what I was saying with all the "higher ISO performance" stuff. If you want to get a slower lens, its best to pair it with a camera body that offers better high-ISO noise performance than the 450D. A 7D would be ideal, but a 5D would also work, or even a 550D which has pretty much the same sensor as the 7D.
Oct
28
comment Over-saturated prints from Lighroom 3?
Yes. The printer, printer profile, and rendering intent are all correct. I have experimented with every setting combination possible, but LR3 still prints out considerably oversaturated, with clipped highlights and blocked shadows.
Oct
28
revised What is the highest quality graduated neutral density filter?
added 1406 characters in body
Oct
28
comment What size lens is recommended for flying bird photography?
Good point about where the images go. Small format for publication on the web, or small format print, the Bigma is a great lens with great reach.
Oct
28
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
28
revised What size lens is recommended for flying bird photography?
added 124 characters in body
Oct
28
comment What size lens is recommended for flying bird photography?
@whuber: Sorry, you are correct. I was thinking 1.4x in my head at the time. There are also other inherent problems with the 2x converter, as it seems (according to many reviews and tons of forums) that it makes images rather soft, particularly in the corners.
Oct
27
revised What size lens is recommended for flying bird photography?
deleted 6 characters in body
Oct
27
comment What size lens is recommended for flying bird photography?
Keep in mind that the 300/4+1.4x converter will loose about 1 stop worth of aperture, which effectively makes it an f/5.6 lens. The Canon 400mm f/5.6 lens costs about the same as the 300mm ($1200), but you don't need the additional teleconverter, which costs an additional $500. For a cheaper setup, I would recommend the 400/5.6 over a 300/4+1.4x converter. Sadly, I totally agree about budgeting for bigger and ever more powerful lenses...bird photography is terribly expensive! :P
Oct
27
answered What size lens is recommended for flying bird photography?
Oct
27
comment Recommend which site to sell photos? and it is for Spanish-speaking community
Locale-specific questions (i.e. Spanish Speaking) are difficult to answer, and we generally try to avoid them. We prefer to have questions and answers that provide value to the community as a whole, rather than only to a small niche. If you could make your question more general, it would be greatly appreciated.
Oct
27
revised How does one use circular polarizers?
added 1067 characters in body; added 156 characters in body
Oct
27
answered How does one use circular polarizers?
Oct
27
comment How important is ISO speed?
@Dennis: A 300mm lens is ok for bird photography, but you have to get REALLY close to get a really good "frame filling" shot (the holy grail of bird photography). I have the Canon EF 100-400mm L series lens myself. It lists for $1800, but I managed to get mine for about $1500 online. The Canon EF 400mm L is also a decent lens (I see a LOT of 7D bird photographers use it), and it lists at about $1200. Both lenses are a little slower, but with the higher ISO capabilities of the 7D, it doesn't seem to be a big problem. You might want to ask another question so I can better answer this in detail.
Oct
26
accepted How do I generate high quality prints with an ink jet printer?
Oct
26
comment Points to be taken care for a good photo snap
One other comment, I guess. There are some key but perhaps subtle differences between the "Poor" shots and the "Good" shots. Examine those images closely to fully understand the differences. The first couple look nice at first glance, but after a little scrutiny, they start to look really "flat" due to the direct and rather uninteresting lighting.
Oct
26
comment How can I avoid soft dull “spots” in my pictures?
@BBischof: No, no. Not at all. :D (I just didn't see it before.)
Oct
26
comment How can I avoid soft dull “spots” in my pictures?
I did try moving the camera. I've taken enough shots now to know for a fact that the spots are on the sensor. I get the same spots in the same location in my pictures every time I take a photo. Sometimes they don't show up if the location they are at is complex...but in solid colors or smooth gradients, they show up like beacons. I have to find a cleaning system for my camera and clean the sensor.
Oct
26
comment How can I avoid soft dull “spots” in my pictures?
@BBischof: HA! Funny. :P
Oct
26
comment Where can I find comparisons for linear polarizers (for a cheap variable ND filter)?
Have to vote this one up. I own the Lee filter system myself, and it is awesome. There is nothing quite like having a single set of filters that works for every lens you own. Lee filters are excellent too, and many of the more specialized ones, such as the polarizer, they offer in a multicoated glass variant. Good stuff. The polarizer attaches to the front of the foundation kit, and it isn't too difficult to rotate. You can combine GND filters and a polarizer all at once if you need to. When you use 4x6 filters, it gets a little tougher to rotate the polarizer, but it is not impossible.