Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen 20 hours ago

I'm a technician, not a photographer.


23h
revised Why is there an ISO setting when shooting raw?
added 633 characters in body
23h
comment Why is there an ISO setting when shooting raw?
I was saying it in a sense that if you change the ISO, you also change the aperture/shutter speed, for correct exposure. So, it affects the amount of light captured. However, if in manual mode and in settings ƒ/5.6 1/125 shutter speed fixed, but change the ISO... Yes, you are correct. If you change the ISO and nothing else, this does not change the amount of light/photons captured (if you have a consistent light source, of course) but the resulting image will be over/under exposed.
Jul
15
comment Raw is larger and softer than JPG
Are you asking if RAW is smaller or larger? BTW, after you've edited/post-processed a RAW file, it then compresses it into a jpg afterwards anyway.
Jul
12
comment How to avoid water in a shower from appearing to fall upwards?
Use first shutter curtain flash? Have you got examples of what you don't want?
Jul
2
comment Difference in image capture area between full frame and medium frame
Yes, you will be able to see more IF you're using the same subject distance and the same focal length. However, if you're going to try to achieve the same field of view, you'll need to change focal length or subject distance (or both). If you do this, you get get different background compression.
Jul
1
comment Difference in image capture area between full frame and medium frame
You can also check out this question and answer/s.
Jun
25
comment Should higher ISOs really be preferred (all other things being equal)?
I will say though, in your question, you don't take into account the aperture.
Jun
25
comment Should higher ISOs really be preferred (all other things being equal)?
Yes, precisely! I've always found his answer a bit misleading. It's as if photo.stackexchange found a new god after that answer...
Jun
24
comment Should higher ISOs really be preferred (all other things being equal)?
I think all Matt Grum was trying to say was that if you're in low light conditions, it's better to boost ISO within the camera rather than fixing up the exposure in PP. Of course ISO100 will have less noise but if you're stuck for lack of light, boost ISO. Further to this, it's lack of light that creates noise, not necessarily ISO only. Because increasing ISO (in modern cameras) can help reduce noise. That's all (I think. Or, my interpretation) Mr. Grumm was saying.
Jun
9
comment Is it true that cameras with larger sensors are more likely to mis-focus under low light?
What's "TANSTAAFL"??
Jun
6
comment Macro lens for Olympus E-3
Macro lenses can come in varying focal lengths, they just generally aren't zooms. 50mm and 35mm are the only 4/3 macro lenses. Macro also just means a 1:1 reproduction image size. So, if you took a photo of a 24mmx36mm box on a 135 format camera, that box would fill the frame. The length could mean you are 1m away from it. But in general terms, a macro lens has close focussing distances and also aren't zooms.
Jun
6
comment Macro lens for Olympus E-3
Nothing, really. But any lens at 50mm compared to another can be different because a certain lens can hold different characteristics and have different minimum/maximum apertures. But the difference between a Macro 50mm and a standard 50mm is the focussing distance. Macro lenses have a much closer focusing distance and are generally a fixed focal length (doesn't zoom). That lens you have, technically is not a Macro lens.
Jun
6
revised Macro lens for Olympus E-3
added 1435 characters in body
Jun
5
revised Macro lens for Olympus E-3
edited body
Jun
5
answered Macro lens for Olympus E-3
Jun
4
comment When is a camera 'worn'?
When it's around your neck.
Jun
3
comment What features would cause a portrait photographer to choose a DSLR over Mirrorless?
"If there is even a 180mm f/2 equivalent MILC lens available, it will be about the same size/weight as the DSLR counterparts, so where is the MILC advantage?" Strongly disagree. Have you seen the size of the 75mm f/1.8?
Jun
2
comment What features would cause a portrait photographer to choose a DSLR over Mirrorless?
"Ergonomics are usually better, especially for larger lenses." While that's true (if you're going to use an adaptor with a bigger lens), the purpose of (lets say 4/3) is that the lenses are also smaller.
Jun
2
comment What features would cause a portrait photographer to choose a DSLR over Mirrorless?
Haha!! Wow. Your Professionalism points are interesting. :) I can't tell who you need to impress with "the bigger the better"? Some clients are more comfortable (being able to see your face) while at events you need a bigger bag to "look" professional? I'm confused...
May
28
comment What's the difference between colour space and bit depth?
OK. As the example mattdm uses, lets say 255,255,0 was mapped in a colour space that didn't have red. What would it look like?