It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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1,613 reputation
921
bio website
location ND
age 31
visits member for 3 years
seen May 18 at 19:43

Jun
25
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
14
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
11
awarded  Yearling
Apr
30
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
26
comment How to match colors on photographs stitched together?
@WilliamKF "M" setting is not sufficient. Also use identical white balance settings when converting the raw files.
Feb
26
comment How to match colors on photographs stitched together?
Just google for "stitch panorama in photoshop" and you'll find everything you need. CS6 does have this feature. Key things are Edit -> Auto Align and Edit -> Auto Blend. Auto-Blend does sort of what you're asking for. Actually it will cut the layers along a line chosen to minimize the differences between them, it will usually look seamless. I haven't used this with your method though (moving camera position), only with rotating the camera while its position is fixed.
Feb
26
comment What should I look for in a wide angle lens?
I think yes: many more wide angle photos will have the sun in them than photos taken with narrower lenses.
Feb
26
comment How to match colors on photographs stitched together?
Are you using Photoshop's automated stitcher? It should take care of this automatically. Or is it producing bad results in other ways?
Feb
25
comment What should I look for in a wide angle lens?
What about flare resistance?
Feb
18
comment Nikon D60: Autofocus of two AF-S lenses not working anymore after using another lens
So you can see the focus ring on your 18-55 rotating, but the camera never achieves proper focus? It sounds like the camera cannot detect when the image is in focus anymore. What happens when you turn on the rangefinder (page 116 in the manual) and set the lens to manual focus? Does it ever indicate correct focus as you are focusing manually? If not, there may be a problem with the AF system.
Feb
13
comment Why is the Nikon 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED IF AF-S VR twice as costly as Nikon 55-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR AF-S DX?
The 70-300 focuses much, much faster than the 55-300. The 70-300 feels almost instantaneous at large focus distances. With the 55-300 one can watch the focus slowly change in the viewfinder.
Feb
13
comment External power for compact camera?
Is your kit also for Nikon cameras? Do you know if the plug it uses is a special proprietary one or a standard USB? (EN-EL12 uses less than 5 V). I'm ultimately looking to power both the camera and a Raspberry Pi from a large USB-compatible 5 V external battery.
Feb
13
comment How can I detect upscaled photos?
You can try taking the Fourier transform of the image and looking at the presence of high frequency components. Upscaled images won't have much of high-frequency components. Beware though that JPEG compression also removes some of these. I just tried this method and it seems to be fairly sensitive to down- then up-scaling. It will take a fair bit of work to make it reliable though.
Feb
13
comment External power for compact camera?
I wonder how you found that. I just spent 20 minutes googling in the hope of finding something like this!
Feb
13
accepted External power for compact camera?
Feb
13
asked External power for compact camera?
Feb
11
comment What *exactly* is white balance?
There's some interesting info here, e.g. page 58 and onwards. It's a pity I don't have time to read it right now :(
Feb
11
comment What *exactly* is white balance?
Sorry if my comment lead you to believe that I have the answers, I don't :) I don't understand how human perception works, and this is an interesting question. A keyword you can search for is "chromatic adaptation". The scientific field studying perception is called "psychophysics".
Feb
11
comment What *exactly* is white balance?
"Why do we 'correct' this" <-- because our eyes (or rather brains) do as well. What's relevant for humans (or other creatures) is primarily the colour of objects, not the colour of light reflected by objects. So the brain corrects for light sources of different colours to be able to recognize colours/objects better. The purpose of white balance correction in cameras is to imitate this and produce photos that look "natural". There's no fundamental laws of physics behind this, it's all about imitating our human perception.
Feb
9
revised Why do my photos “glow”?
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