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2

The two bottom pictures will "look" the same. They have the same angle of view, assuming the object is far enough so that the different lens to image plane distance is not relevant to the lens to object distance. This would be true, for example, for a landscape shot of a mountain. You have the same number of pixels presenting the same picture, but all is ...


-1

Will there be any differences between the images captured by the second and third drawing? Yes. The angle of view is different. You may capture the same amount of the subject in both images, but because the full frame sensor has a wider angle of view it will capture more of the background. To see this, redraw each of the two drawings and add a large ...


1

You will want to have a non-extending zoom lens when using anamorphic adapters which often need to be tied with a lens support (like Lanparte lens support); not only to support them but to avoid them from turning when using focus, which would skew the image on an anamorphic.


1

People like me who still shoot old, manual, film cameras loaded with B&W film. Primes are cheaper, have basically nothing that will fail, and you can get faster primes for the same price. I also don't need AF (my bodies are all older Nikons that are MF only), and most MF lenses are primes. Having access to a bigger aperture when using film can be a big ...


2

Might also have to do with speed. Some zooms are limited in their range, being slower at longer focal lengths. Take a look at photographers on sidelines of football matches; they might have one long fast zoom and then a shorter lens on a second body in case the player gets close. They are, however, specialized lenses. Usually for situations where you are ...


46

Who in the world buys large primes? Wildlife and sports photographers, mostly. I'm struggling to see how one would find use in a long focal length prime, 300mm and above for example: without zoom, isn't your shot composition always at the mercy of how close or far away your subject is, meaning heavy cropping is almost always necessary in post? ...


4

You might buy one in order to get a balance of high quality, reasonable size and weight, fast aperture, and a lower price. As you say, people often get shorter primes because they like a particular field of view, and I don't think that's usually the case beyond, say, 90mm (in 35mm terms). That list of compromises can't be avoided — but giving up zoom lets ...


0

I have the Sigma 50-500mm, the OS (stabilisation) is fine, however the lens is a tad bit soft at the 500mm, and it's very heavy so a tripod is really mandatory. Can't say about the other lenses though.


1

I had a Sigma 150-500mm f/5-6.3 lens. I don't know how that lens compares to the lenses you're considering. The image stabilization worked well, but autofocus hunted all the time. Image quality was fair, not great. Add a teleconverter and the image quality would have been poor. Autofocus, already poor, would not have worked at all, and shooting in ...


2

With the 70-300mm, I guess I could take pictures of the moon or any other close up objects 300mm doesn't really get you close enough for the moon. You could use a teleconverter, but you'd either have to get a third party one or make warranty-breaking modifications to a Nikon one. However, you can get some nice wildlife pictures at 300mm, particularly ...


1

Assuming you are working in good light during the day, you don't really need an extremely fast aperture. What you need is focal length. The more the better. But only you can answer the question regarding whether paying more for better performance is worth it or not. The Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS Contemporary is a popular lens due to the focal length ...


4

The Nikon AF 70-300mm F4-5.6 ED D was a fair lens back in the day, but the problem you'll have now is that it's not an AF-S lens -- meaning it doesn't have an autofocus motor built in -- and will therefore be manual-focus only on the 5300.


2

It's an old question ( EG http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/2714173 ). The short answer is that it is most advantageous for Video, because when you zoom in everything doesn't get darker. For single frame Photos you can adjust ISO and Shutter speed (the automatic Setting will do it for you) on a shot by shot basis and get all Photos similar; in a Video ...



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