Mist

by Jakub

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0

Performance in terms of acutance of any lens varies in a lot of ways, but throwing in the variable focal lengths a zoom lens is capable of adds to the complexity of things. Even a prime lens with a fixed focal length can vary in terms of center sharpness from one aperture setting to the next. How much that sharpness is degraded from the center to the edges ...


2

No, that's not generally true. You might look at the DxOmark website for actual measurements on different lenses. Sharpness at different points across the field is one of the things measured in great detail, and graphed using color to indicate sharpness. The sharpness varies not only with the specific lens, but varies with the zoom setting on zoom lenses, ...


5

As with any blanket statement, it's not true in every case that primes will give consistent sharpness across the field and zoom lenses won't. To take one specific example, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II has much worse performance in the corners than the centre at f/2.8, whereas the Canon EF 24-70 f/2.8L II USM is pretty consistent across the frame at 50mm, ...


1

I've written one answer, but I'm going to try again with a different approach. Maybe you'll find this more helpful. A prime lens — a lens with no zoom — has a certain fixed focal length. It always shows the same field of view. A zoom lens, on the other hand, can vary over a range of focal lengths, for wider and narrower fields of view. When a zoom lens is ...


0

When the term zoom is used with lenses it simply means that you can change the magnification oft the lens. There are also other lenses which can't be zoomed, they are called prime lenses. The magnification numbers you see in point and shoot cameras are simply a quotient of the largest and smallest focal length oft the lens. Lets assume you have a zoom lens ...


1

The question is one of comparing apples and oranges. Take this analogy: We can determine how strong an animal is by how many times an it can lift/pull it's own weight. That scale suggests we should have been using ants instead of horses to pull carts and work the land... but we know that's not right because we can ride a horse but would definitely crush an ...


1

I used the following formula that helped me better understand the focal magnifications when I went to DSLR’s from digital compacts. First, I decided what I would consider to be a perfect focal range to mimic the human eye. this was a little short of 50mm, but I settled on 50mm. (please do note, that this is only a conceptual attempt to rationalise what ...


1

In colloquial usage "zooming in" on something is to make it appear closer or larger. In technical terms, this is represented by the focal length. Your confusion comes from expecting the zoom ratio (the "times zoom") number to represent the amount of zoom in the colloquial sense, when in photography we use it simply in its technical sense: the amount any ...


0

Lens sharpness is fairly complex topic as there are many variables that dictate what makes an image sharp and what does not. Here I will try and keep it as basic as possible with a just a few areas that can be considered regarding sharpness. It is generally true that Prime Lenses are sharper than Zoom Lenses. The reason for this is due to a prime Lens not ...


-3

Generally yes. A camera lens is composed of many lens elements. Each element bends light in a different way. Some elements need to be made of a different material that bends some colors more or less than others (especially at the edges). It is difficult to manufacture elements that are of unusual shapes (aspherical) or that require much finer tolerance. A ...


0

It is a little complicated as field stops values might be different so you be comparing apples to oranges. In general your focal length is like a radius so a lens that is 18- 55 millimeter change in focal length would have a 3.05 change in radius. Allowing that the 18 mm to be your reference picture, if you then adjusted to 55 mm you would be taking a ...


0

From the sound of it you should honestly just invest in a nice point and shoot. If you buy a DSLR for the trip you're going to want a zoom that's 200mm or so which can get pricey. And unless you know what you're doing with the camera and can quickly adjust ISO, Shutter, f. stop, etc... you're going to be shooting it in auto mode anyway which would ...


1

Aperture is a bit of a misnomer; a hold-over from simpler times and simpler lens designs. What matters is the entrance pupil, or the apparent size of the aperture as viewed through the front (business end) of the lens. With a simple lens design (a double-Gauss or Tessar, for instance), the physical aperture and the entrance pupil are approximately the same ...



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