Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

It's transfer speed. 100X means 100 times faster than a 1x CD-ROM (whose data rate is 150KB/s). So a 100x card is 100 * 150 KB/s or 15,000 KB/s or 15MB/s (note that this is data rates, not storage). These are, of course, theoretical max writes, and real world, average case performance is not that high. You just need to get a CF card that can keep up with ...


10

Camera reviews on dpreview mention writing speeds (example: EOS 550D). If there's no documentation it should be possible to derive actual camera+card write speed by switching to RAW and shooting in sequence until your buffer fills up (then shooting fps should go down significantly). Then writing_speed = raw_file_size * fps_with_full_buffer.


7

The speed of the memory card is definitely one constraining factor but as you suspect there are other bottlenecks. First there is the internal memory buffer of the camera. Each camera only has so much RAM installed. When you shoot this buffer is filled first and the camera does what it can to quickly empty the buffer to allow for more shooting. The size of ...


7

Mostly, no. Let me clarify. There are three speed limits: The speed limit of your camera The write speed limit of your card. The read speed of your card. When speed #2 is greater or equal to speed #1, the camera operates at its maximum performance. It will shoot at its highest frame rate until the internal buffer gets full and then slows down while ...


7

For SDHC cards there are "Class" ratings that indicate the speed. There is a table on wikipedia that compares the ratings, but the class # is the key. I have used Class 10, which is fairly affordable, but still quite fast. It will never hurt to have a faster card, so given a choice you always want the higher class. Update: There is a new designation of ...


5

This other question covers how to figure out what speed you really need. But to answer the other part of what you are asking: No, card speed does not affect image quality in any way. The image files are digital, and it's not like analog cassette tapes where the composition of the media can make a difference. The only case image quality could be affected is ...


5

As with just about any camera, a buffer will be used to hold a number of shots which are written to the card. Once the buffer fills, the frame rate slows. Even with the fastest cards today, previous generation cameras can't offload their buffer fast enough to sustain a high FPS indefinitely. So, this isn't a new problem to the 1D X or D4, though the speed ...


4

Canon 1D X Photo size of this camera should be somewhere in range of 20-30 mb, and with 12 frames per second that sums up to need to write down 300mb/s, or if we consider that the camera has dual card slot, this would amount to 150 mb/s per card (does this work this way?). Is there anything on market that would sustain such a write speed? Short: ...


4

Rob Galbraith has a full spread of tests with just about every popular card for this camera. To sum up the results, the fastest card is the SanDisk Extreme Pro 8GB SDHC card. It performed at 27.7MB/s JPEG and 26.4MB/s RAW for a burst of 39 shots in 30 seconds. The speed test was performed by shooting 17 JPEG Fine and then 10 NEF files. More info can be ...


4

Rob Galbraith did an experiment with a Canon 450D here which may be useful to you: http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/camera_multi_page.asp?cid=6007-9424 He seems to suggest the camera will write at max of 11-14MB's. The 450D has a similar sized sensor (similar size photo) and the same image processor so your 1000D will be similar. If you shoot in JPG a high ...


2

Deciding what card to buy for a specific camera in order to get the fastest performance of which the camera is capable without spending more than necessary on a card that is even faster than the camera is capable of taking advantage is a daunting task. Not only can it be very confusing when comparing speeds of various cards, but learning how fast a write ...


2

The Canon 500D takes SDHC cards up to 32gb. Any Class 6 or above will make sure that there is never a slow down from the cameras buffer filling up, and the 30MB/s card you mention is a Class 10 card so plenty fast. I just bought two of those myself to replace my 16gb PNY as I get a bit of slow down shooting raw occasionally


2

A reputable camera will not damage the files or reduce the quality in any way if you try to shoot "too fast". The write speed of the memory card sets an upper limit to (frames per second) x (file_size) but if you try to shoot above this limit it will simply not go any faster - you will achieve an overall rate about the same as this limit but all photos ...


1

Most cameras have an internal buffer they write the pictures to first. From there, the images are written out to the (much slower) memory card. So, if you take pictures at maximum speed, your buffer will be full after some time (My Canon EOS 60D can make about 50 JPEGs or 12 RAW images until the buffer is full). After that, I have to wait until at least ...


1

The camera's buffer is most likely the bottleneck. Using a 133x card the dpreview.com review achieved the same 10 RAW frames. From the review: The D7000's buffer is smaller than the D300S as well. We found that even with a fast card, no more than 32 pictures can be taken in a burst at the maximum frame rate before the camera has to slow to clear the ...


1

SD Cards: Your camera can take full advantage of UHS 1 only if it support that protocol. However, in general UHS 1 based cards are faster than normal class 10 cards (and expensive as well). For example, I have two cards. First one is Sandisk Extreme, a class 10 card with data transfer upto 45 MB/s. It also support UHS 1 protocol. My second card is Transcend ...


1

From what I could find on the different modes of your camera it looks like one of the limiting factors is the speed of your SD card. I couldn't find any specs about the cameras writing speed limitations, but it would surprise me if you don't see an (small) speed-up with a faster SD card. Have you tried to "only" take 5-10 pictures while in Top 20/40 mode, ...


1

I did quite a bit of research and the consensus seems to be that a Class 6 card will be worthwhile (faster than a Class 4) but that going with a card that's faster than a Class 6 doesn't provide any meaningful speed upgrade.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible