Incense

by Bart Arondson

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7

that's an interesting question! The first thing you need to consider I guess is the type of kite you wish to use; i.e. will you be using a single line kite, or a 2-4 line controllable kite? I'd recommend using a large-ish single line kite which will allow you to more easily use a really long line which will help to get the camera to a better altitude. ...


6

An Eye-Fi card in the camera coupled with a phone that can act as a wireless hotspot should do the trick. The Eye-Fi card will (based on your configuration) automatically upload the photos to a service of your choice such as Flickr, and the portable hotspot means that you'll have connectivity as long as you have cell coverage. For a hotspot there are ...


6

Pretty sure it's not possible with the wireless remote. You can set custom function D11 to ON. D11 is the Exposure Delay Mode, which will flip the mirror up then wait a second and then trigger the shutter. With this turned on, your wireless remote will work in remote mode and you'll get a 1 second mirror up delay.


5

The flash is triggered by the popup-flash of the 7D. The signal is transmitted by light, it is just way too fast for the naked eye to see. The popup flash would strobes rapidly, like sending out morse-codes, and the external flash would pick it up and fires in sync. The whole thing is super fast, like in 1/500 of a second. Understanding that, you now know ...


5

You normally have to set the camera to accept the remote signal. This can be found sometimes with the drive modes or self-timer, it really depends on your model. Once the camera is ready. Aim at one of the IR receptors and click the release. Some cameras have a front receptor, some have a back one and some have both. Look for what looks like a small very ...


5

Concerning how the camera keeps taking pictures while on the kite, you might have read my answer to the question what one can use the intervalometer-script of the CHDK for Canon-cameras for. If you own an older Canon compact, look at the list here.


5

I think your best bet would be to find a compact camera that can support time-lapse photography (natively or via custom ROM). When you start to get into pricier equipment and more sophisticated control mechanisms, you really need to be looking at a different platform (ie, a plane or helicopter) because of the added weight and the risk of damage should you ...


5

Canon make a wifi grip for the 5D Mark II called the WFT-E4 II A, which advertises EOS Utility-based control of cameras over a network. This provides similar functionality with PC/Mac based Canon EOS Utility software. There are similar grips available for the Canon 1D range (1DmkIII onwards), 5DmkIII and 7D. However the wording on the page you linked (and ...


5

There are five possible methods that I can think of: Tethering to a Computer You can connect the camera to a computer via USB. However, this limits movement and can be inconvenient at times. This also requires specialized software. This is the cheapest option by far. You will still need a conection to the internet. An Eye-Fi card The second cheapest ...


4

If you are unable to find a Bluetooth solution, and you cannot connect the Eye-Fi to the same WiFi network that the computer is using, one alternative would be to purchase a USB WiFi adapter for the computer, to provide a second WiFi interface. You can use the second WiFi interface to communicate with certain models of Eye-Fi in Ad Hoc mode.


4

While there aren't a ton of cameras out there with bluetooth support, here are a few I found which you may want to look into: Samsung ST1000 Samsung CL65 Kodak EasySshare V610 Now all of these cameras are a little 'long in the tooth,' and I haven't used any of them... This was just me and Google coming up with some options. I also found an interesting ...


4

Perhaps this is not quite what you have in mind, but you could consider taking some video before moving on to still photos. I bought a low-quality digital video camera off eBay for ~10USD. It's about the size of my thumb, and weighs just a few grams. It's a good way to experiment, you can see what kind of views you would get without having to consider how to ...


4

I found infrared remotes to be too slow for my taste, and bought a cheap YongNuo RF-602 sender/receiver pair (less than $50) for my nikon. It is not perfect, but way better than any infrared remote I ever owned: no need to point the remote to the cam, the delay is shorter, works over bigger distance. I even bought extra cables so I can use it with any of my ...


4

Yes, you can, provided that your Rebel supports remote shutter release. Just different remotes will behave differently and you need to check how exactly. Some will open the shutter on first push of the button and close on the second, while the others need to be held down during the whole exposure time. This behavior might also depend on other settings, like ...


4

Sounds like you want optical slaves. Use your on camera flash as normal. Put those on the off camera flash and they'll fire when triggered by the main flash. Note - some flash units have this capability built in.


4

EDIT: Ironically, while I wrote this answer, the press release of the first camera to do this was waiting in my inbox :) There is one such camera, it is the Panasonic Lumix GH3. A few WiFi cameras exist without this function but do not despair. Once cameras have WiFi control, such functions can be software driven and do not have to be built into the ...


3

Your best bet for this is a tablet or smartphone with a camera. That should do what you want. Either Apple iPhone/iPod/iPad or Android should do.


3

I can't answer precisely for Canon, but I use Pentax's similar wireless P-TTL all the time. Since the basics are the same, I think it should be helpful. If you are in a relatively small space, and light from the control flash is able to bounce to the sensor, it works just fine. Even if the line of sight isn't direct, there's usually some surface that will ...


3

No, there are not any for the Rebel line. The EyeFi is your best option, and works well with the Rebels, especially the T1i, T2i and T3i. The newer EyeFi products support saving to mobile devices running iOS or Android, similar to the Canon wifi adapters pushing to FTP. It also can push video and RAW to your computer or to their servers. The biggest ...


3

If you want to use i-TTL, the safest options it to go with Nikon. The cheapest Nikon flash available new would be the Nikon SB-700, or the Nikon SB-600 if you can find it used. However, if you don't need i-TTL, you can get away with any cheap flash. For example I have a pair of YN-460 speedlights, dirt cheap compared to the Nikon flashes but can still be ...


3

Smartphones these days have on average 8 mega pixel sensors, autofocus and other decent camera features, as well as having WiFi built in. I'm sure there are probably apps available that allow precise control of the hardware. If not, consider commissioning one; it's not as expensive as some of the more costly camera accessories and you could sell it to other ...


3

You can get the same result by doing the reverse using a Toshiba FlashAir card because a FlashAir card is a WiFi hotspot. So you can connect the laptop or other network-enabled device such as a phone or tablet to the Flashair. Sorry to hijack the brand you are looking for but I think it will serve your purpose.


3

Four main options exist: Cameras with built in Wi-Fi Use an Eye-Fi card Tether the camera to a computer that can upload the images Shoot with a camera that also has the ability to upload to Facebook, such as a smartphone camera Eye-Fi can in fact do this. They have a webpage dedicated to the functionality you are interested in here: ...


2

Your SB-600 is already compatible with Nikon's CLS wireless (infrared) flash control system. It's a pretty good system to build around; you get TTL (ie: automatic exposure), multiple flash capability, and remote control of your flash level. I own one of these flashes myself, and it's definitely a nice option to have. Unfortunately, your current D3000 body ...


2

You have a number of choices depending on the way you want to trigger the flash. Optical Cheapest: buy simple optical triggers that are attached to the flash shoe and are triggered by the built-in flash on the D3000. Cons: you can't use the E-TTL flash protocol. More expensive: buy the SU-200 commander flash unit. This can be used to trigger and control ...


2

There are a few options for that. You need to figure your budget first. 1) On the cheap side of the scale, there are the optical slaves that can trigger an off camera flash when detecting another flash fires. 2) Similarly, there are cheap radio triggers that let you connect a transmitter to your camera's hot shoe and trigger a flash that is mounted on the ...


2

Thus far, Eye-Fi does not support compact flash. They have a page on their website that lists known issues when using an adapter. These issues include a reduced wireless range of the Eye-Fi card as well as a potential for file corruption. I'm not aware of any competitor's products which offer similar functionality in a CF card. I do note however that it ...



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