Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

The easiest poor man's way would simply be to take a simple trigger that works off a circuit closing. Remove the switch, wire up a bunch of additional switches in series and the circuit won't be completed unless all switches are pressed. It requires some manual work, but is probably the absolute cheapest way you could accomplish the goal.


5

I use this: http://amzn.com/B002W3IXZW from cowboy studio or if you have more money I would get this: http://amzn.com/B00BBQ8IDS from Pocketwizard which was just released. Many people also praise the inexpensive Yongnuo transmitter/triggers. The 60D even has a built in wireless transmitter. The 60D's built-in flash can act as a controller or commander to ...


5

The sync speed itself doesn't change, as that is defined by how quickly the shutter curtains move, but what is happening is the trigger is adding a delay, which throws off the timing. What ought to happen at 1/200s is that the first curtain reaches the top, the flash fires, then the second curtain starts closing immediately from the bottom. However due to ...


4

So, having looked for some for a while, I'm going to have to sadly put forth "No" as the answer here. The TTL features of the radio triggers are relatively new, and their makers have (reasonably enough from a business point of view) gone with the market dominators first. Hopefully, they keep hearing enough from Pentax users that they'll consider the smaller ...


4

Sounds like you want optical slaves. Use your on camera flash as normal. Put those on the off camera flash and they'll fire when triggered by the main flash. Note - some flash units have this capability built in.


4

Well. the max sync speed presupposes that the slave flash reacts instantly to the trigger. If it takes any amount of time at all for the slave to react, that is going to eat into your sync speed as the second curtain will have started to close before the slave flash actually fires. So I'd say that yes, you would be better off to back off some from max sync ...


4

I could be wrong, but garage door openers work on RF and not IR and they have to be configured to work with your garage door (they won't work with any garage door out of the box). Similarly, while the IR beam may be the same, different cameras may respond to them differently or require different patterns to operate. I'm not too savvy on IR spec's, but I see ...


4

You can, using the sync port on the Yongnuo trigger. However, AlienBees use a 3.5mm mono sync, so you'll need a cord that can connect the two up. Fortunately, they exist and Paul Buff sells them. You can probably also find smaller cables, but you may want to consider the long ones anyways as they may let you do some funky strobe positioning, behind things ...


3

This Canon site article: http://www.learn.usa.canon.com/resources/articles/2012/eos6d_builtin_flash_alternative.shtml discussed a nice alternative--a 90ex speedlight which can act as a Master unit with a 430exII as a slave. I have just ordered one to use with my Canon 6D and will see if it works as indicated. I also like that it is quite small, and can ...


3

In addition to a radio trigger, you might consider an off camera shoe cord. They come in lengths from 1.5' to 10'. They are a very economical option for getting the flash off camera while still retaining TTL capability. This shot was taken using an off shoe cord in a dimly lit banquet hall. I hand held the flash with my left hand about 18-24" away from the ...


3

I use the Camera Axe (http://www.cameraaxe.com) with great success. Its an open source project that's been around for a while and has a fairly large user and support base. The device has four phono plugs which can each be configured as an input or output trigger. Simply connecting a wireless device (e.g. PocketWizard) to these ports will let you trigger a ...


3

This is what I found on page 177 in the manual for Canon 60D: While this certainly works with the Canon's radio remote, I have not actually tested it with the Yongnuo. My guess is, the signal from the trigger simulates the 'immediate shooting' signal emitted by Canon's own triggers, and that's why you are only able to shoot stills with it. As far as I ...


3

Have a look at the Amazon "Product Description" more closely, the trigger is hotshoe mounted, so it will work without the need for the sync cable. In any event, if you don't want to get that one, the Cactus triggers work as well. I use those with my K-5 and Alien Bees and have never had a problem (nor had to use the PC cable, though the K-5 can use one).


3

It depends on the capabilities of the transmitter and receiver and how the transmitter is triggered. In general if the transmitter is attached to the hot shoe or PC connection of the camera you are operating ('master'), then one short signal to fire will be emitted each time the 'master' camera's shutter fires, since that is what activates the hot shoe/PC ...


3

When you take a picture with a flash, the flash discharges from a bank of capacitors for a given time to regulate the flash power. The higher power the flash, the longer the flash is discharged for, and thus, the more power is used and the longer recharge takes. The most common solution for your problem is to alter the criteria so that you can take more ...


2

This may sound silly..but are you sure its rotated the correct way? It doesn't look like the flash shoe would prevent it from this angle and any of those four pins resting on the ground plate could cause funky things for sure. If not... While I can't say for sure, part of your problem could be this (although I can't imagine why it would be causing rapid ...


2

http://www.aokatec.com/ This radio trigger appears to support P-TTL and high-speed sync. I found this in this dpreview forum thread: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1036&message=40799541&changemode=1 See also http://www.lightingrumours.com/aokatec-ttl-trigger-for-nikon-canon-sony-pentax-1875.


2

No, they're not compatible. See the website: http://www.phottix.com/en/studio-accessories/phottix-atlas-ii-2-4ghz-wireless-trigger.html for details, it's stated very early in the product description. In fact, it says it 4 times in the page, so I'm guessing they get this question a lot...


2

Almost all wireless triggers I am aware of work with hot shoes. Phottix: Atlas, Strato Pocket Wizard Cactus Yongnuo - RF-602, RF-603 RadioPopper JrX I know some of these (Phottix, Yongnuo) are compatible with Pentax, but you'd need to research each model to be sure.


2

I think you will find that the RF603 is only certified to work with a flash trigger voltage of less than 12v. If you want to a trigger setup that will take a higher voltage then the Cactus is better. Drawback of Cactus is no TTL passthrough on the transmitter. A better option is the Comtrig T320 or G430, both of which can take high voltage flash units and ...


2

Wireless systems are triggered in one of two ways: optically by either infrared light or the visible light from the master flash unit or via radio signal from the transmitter to the receiver(s). In both cases there are systems that are capable of TTL when the various camera/flash combinations are all compatible with a single manufacturers system, and there ...


2

Triggers like the Pocket Wizards allow you you to interact wirelessly with your flash as if it were hard wired to the hot shoe of your camera. Of course the top Pocket Wizard systems cost considerably more than flashes like the LumiPro LP180. Non-TTL wireless radio triggers generally only communicate in one direction that allow the flash(es) to know when the ...


2

Probably because most users of the 1-series cameras from Canon don't expect to use their 1-series camera in situations that lend themselves to infrared remotes. Most pros who desire to release the shutter of their camera via a wireless remote use radio triggers that are much more reliable and configurable in environments that are usually rich with sources ...


1

The product description on the page you link to states that it is 433 MHz, so it is radio (RF), not IR. Product Description This wireless remote shutter release is very useful and helpful gear for prevent vibration when taking photos under long exposures, close-ups (macro) or continuous shooting. It can instantly trigger the shutter without ...


1

The product on Amazon appears to use radio of some sort, probably RF as there's an aerial. For long bulb exposures I wouldn't use a radio trigger as your relying on the battery and signal for a long time. I'd go with a wired release. You have the option to use the Nikon MC-DC2 (listed as compatible with the D5100) or any one of the far cheaper copies. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible