Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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18

If you're going to take courses, I'd suggest you take them in zoology, wildlife preservation and management, or related fields about wildlife. While learning to master your camera and getting the correct lenses and support gear and learning the proper techniques for the type of wildlife you want to shoot is going to be important, the one skill you absolutely ...


3

Start by taking photos. I wouldn't worry with a class as much as with finding people to give you criticism and guidance. Instead consider a Photo Trip. National Geographic for example offers a number of them throughout the year: National Geographic Expeditions. But you can find all sorts if you search Google for things like Wildlife Photography Trips You ...


9

You don't become a surgeon without first becoming a doctor. Similarly wildlife photography is a specialization of our hobby that you get into later. I would recommend that you first buy a cheap beginner camera and lens and learn basic photography, click pictures of birds, pets and what not. If you find that photography is to your liking then invest in a ...


0

There are variety of telescopic lens in the market. Its upto you to choose the best which suites your requirement and budget. Lens like Sigma 150-600mm, Sigma 70-300mm are very good for wildlife photography. Along with telescopic lens, one should also have a prime len for some amazing clarity and picture quality. Hope this help!


1

None. 200 mm is not enough for wildlife. Get the 100-400. If you insist on 70-200, the IS mk II is the best. The f/4 version is much lighter, cheaper and optically also very good, but wild animals are often best photographed around dusk and dawn and in otherwise bad light. So the 1 stop loss may cost you on sharpness and shadow detail. Yes, the 100-400 is ...


1

The occasion for this purchase is a trip I'll soon take to shoot wildlife... Unless you plan on shooting exactly the same wildlife in exactly the same way when you get back home, I'd actually say that renting a Great White L for the trip makes more sense than purchasing one. What you shoot at home and what you shoot on vacation can differ drastically. ...


0

I've been reading everything I could from all sorts of sites, but still can't make up my mind which one to go for This is the point where nobody can help you because it is your decision now. If you read everything, what else to read are you looking for? Rent one version of the lens and see how it works for you. If you are so scared of both buying the ...


0

A lot depends on the situations you want to be prepared for. If you do your shooting during daylight, with generally more than enough light available, you don't need to drop the significant extra money to get 2.8 instead of 3.5 or 4.5. Even a running deer at 300 mm is easy to catch noise free with T=1/400 and f=4.5; if you have nice sunlight, you will end ...


0

Here are points to consider when making choice: 1x crop sensor + teleconverter is almost never better (have not seen counter-examples yet) than 1,5x crop sensor with same resolution and technological level + same objective without teleconverter. Teleconverter is extra glass and extra glass always means some light loss, some contrast loss and some ...


1

The Nikon ED AF-S VR-NIKKOR 70-200mm 1:2.8G combined with a 2x teleconverter is probably the best choice overall, I have the Sigma 50-500mm myself, it very heavy, and it's very dark. The VR/IS is fair but you will still need good light, if you wish to keep ISO down. It's soft on the long end, so 70-200 2.8 with a teleconverter will probably be round the ...



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