Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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18

If you're going to take courses, I'd suggest you take them in zoology, wildlife preservation and management, or related fields about wildlife. While learning to master your camera and getting the correct lenses and support gear and learning the proper techniques for the type of wildlife you want to shoot is going to be important, the one skill you absolutely ...


9

You don't become a surgeon without first becoming a doctor. Similarly wildlife photography is a specialization of our hobby that you get into later. I would recommend that you first buy a cheap beginner camera and lens and learn basic photography, click pictures of birds, pets and what not. If you find that photography is to your liking then invest in a ...


7

I'd say that if you have to ask which lens would be most suitable, you're probably going to want the range of the Sigma 50-500mm. The 70-200mm f/2.8 is the best of the lenses you listed. The 70-300mm D has gone through a couple updates over the years, so compared to the other 2, it's a bit dated. But because you're not exactly sure of what you'll be seeing, ...


6

It depends on how you define "work". And it depends on the lens with which you are working. If it means everything will work the way it does as you are now shooting with only the EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 lens the answer is no. Autofocus: Because your T3 limits your auto focus system to lenses with maximum apertures of f/5.6 or wider, even a 1.4x ...


6

Sometimes the circumstance under which you are shooting trumps distinctions between the optical quality of one lens over another, even when there is significant difference in the optical quality of the lenses in question. This is one of those times. When shooting subject matter such as bears in the wilds of Alaska, focal length is the key consideration. ...


5

I've been a professional long-lens bird/nature shooter since the 80's. I used to use very big and pricey dedicated video cameras/lenses, but now have found the wonderful micro-4/3 world and love it. I've gotten some amazing shots, both video and stills, by adapting older long telephoto lenses to my Panasonic G6 and GH3, as well as my Olympus E-PL5 and E-M5 ...


4

Short answer: No, they use underwater lamps with normal light (maybe more intense light than a normal underwater lighting device) and coloured filters for the lens. Note that I said "coloured filters" without saying what colour the filter should be. This is because the colour of the filter one would use for underwater photography depends on the depth you ...


3

I live in Alaska and have shot assignments involving bears for the US Forest Service and the NY Times [ for example ]. In Alaska photographing bears can mean many things. If you end up someplace like Brooks Camp in Katmai, you can actually get quite close to the bears because you are shooting from platforms around habituated animals. Other places you will ...


3

Start by taking photos. I wouldn't worry with a class as much as with finding people to give you criticism and guidance. Instead consider a Photo Trip. National Geographic for example offers a number of them throughout the year: National Geographic Expeditions. But you can find all sorts if you search Google for things like Wildlife Photography Trips You ...


3

We can rule out the 70-300 right off. It's noisy and not great optically. I would take the 70-200 Nikkor as it's got good glass, big aperture and VR but is no good for landscape shots. The Sigma will handle the wide and very long ends but you are right that the compromises needed to make a 50-500 lens are going to result in poorer images. That really ...


3

Switch the camera to using a single auto-focus spot in the middle of the frame. Most high end cameras have this capability. I don't know if your Sony camera can do that or how it will show you the spot if it does, but look around the owners manual. On my Nikon, the autofocus spots are shown as small red rectangles in the viewfinder. You point the spot at ...


3

There are several different methods that can be used for this: Thermal imaging - Recording radiation in the long-infrared range (9,000-14,000nm), ie heat. Most animals are much warmer than their surroundings, so will show up clearly in an image. Disadvantages are thermal cameras can be very expensive, are usually fairly low resolution. Also it may not show ...


3

Teleconverters tend to be better when used on f/2.8 or faster lenses and on primes vs. zooms. Adding one to a 70-300 consumer-grade zoom (if you don't have the L version of the 70-300) is problematic at best, since most of these are f/5.6 lenses at the long end, and adding even just a 1.4x tc to it makes it an f/8 lens--at which point an entry-level dSLR ...


3

The focus on outdoors use and specifically the combination of backpacking and canoeing/kayaking make this a difficult recommendation, I think, if you are focused on learning photography instead of just "taking pictures." For backpacking, I'm not excited about the notion of taking a full-frame DSLR along. Back in the day I carried a film SLR a few times and ...


3

I also had to make this choice. For the TC you must be 100% sure that it goes with your lens. The advantage of a TC is that it is cheaper, smaller, and lighter. A 150-500 will be more expensive, bigger, and heavier but a better aperture. If possible I would recommend rental of a 150-500. This gives you the possibility to test it out for real. If you like ...


2

I'm not sure there's even a Canon TC that will work with that lens, which means a lower quality TC. And loss of at least one stop of light. All in all, perhaps not better quality than simply enlarging the critter when editing the photo. Not only that, but auto focus may suffer a bit, so that can degrade image quality as well. Unfortunately, TC's work best ...


2

The problem here is that once you threw in "wildlife at a distance", you pretty much nixed most everything else except for dSLRs as well as the "starter" part of the equation. Wildlife, especially fast-moving wildlife, is a very specialized and equipment-demanding type of shooting that causes some of us to blow thousands of bucks on a lens and a higher-end ...


2

Bird photography is the kind of situation where you have to select one of the auto-focus point (usually the center one). With such setting, you have a better control where the focus is done (as the camera will not switch between the focus-points). Furthermore you do not really care if the subject is right in the center of the image as, most of the time, you ...


2

It is important whether you use it with a crop or a full frame camera and where in Alaska you go. But in general 200 or even 300 mm is not enough. Get the longest lens, do research and make reservations.


1

None. 200 mm is not enough for wildlife. Get the 100-400. If you insist on 70-200, the IS mk II is the best. The f/4 version is much lighter, cheaper and optically also very good, but wild animals are often best photographed around dusk and dawn and in otherwise bad light. So the 1 stop loss may cost you on sharpness and shadow detail. Yes, the 100-400 is ...


1

The occasion for this purchase is a trip I'll soon take to shoot wildlife... Unless you plan on shooting exactly the same wildlife in exactly the same way when you get back home, I'd actually say that renting a Great White L for the trip makes more sense than purchasing one. What you shoot at home and what you shoot on vacation can differ drastically. ...


1

The Nikon ED AF-S VR-NIKKOR 70-200mm 1:2.8G combined with a 2x teleconverter is probably the best choice overall, I have the Sigma 50-500mm myself, it very heavy, and it's very dark. The VR/IS is fair but you will still need good light, if you wish to keep ISO down. It's soft on the long end, so 70-200 2.8 with a teleconverter will probably be round the ...


1

I certainly won't pretend to be an expert in this area, however a few thoughts came to mind when I was considering why you have these issues. 1] I found this paper on the "Spectral Sensitivities of Wolf Spider Eyes" - there may be some interesting information in there that can be applied to other arachnids. For example, in one experiment it was shown that ...


1

Learning photography is much less about the equipment and much more about pushing yourself to learn. You can learn the basics of photography on essentially anything that allows for manual control of shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Other aspects such as different focal length lenses, flash photography, and so on can be additional topics that one can learn ...


1

This is sort of a trite answer, but the best camera is the one you have with you, that you are most likely to use and/or have handy. There are all sorts of amazing photo essays and very artistic shots done completely on mobile phones, or with outdoors point-and-shoots. I won't recommend specific models or even brands, but considering your outdoor activity, ...


1

The good news is that digital cameras handle outdoor photography the easiest. There tends to be plenty of light and subjects rarely move fast. Any modern DSLR will do and something in the mid-range will allow you to learn photographic controls to exercise your creativity. There are also several weather-sealed models which will allow you to do outdoor ...


1

A teleconverter will magnify the image produced by your lens on the sensor, but will not produce a better resolution than your original lens had. It just cannot: it comes after the lens on the optical path. In other words, if two points were too small/far away to be distinguishable with your lens, the teleconverter will not allow you to distinguish them. ...


1

A converter will decrease your lenses lowest aperture, or make it less useful when it gets darker or shady. Plus, you are limited to a 1.4x converter, as the 2.0 converter will likely cause issues with the autofocus on your lens, since most Canon cameras require f5.6 or better to focus. The 2x converter adds 2 stops. At 300mm, your lens is already at f5.6, ...


1

A 600mm lens on m4/3 gives a 1200mm equivalent. That's an incredibly narrow field of view, probably too narrow for most subjects. Also, I'd want that absolutely locked on the steadiest tripod and head I could find (and mounting to the lens rather than the body), and firing via a remote release. Anything else would be an exercise in frustration and camera ...



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