India Point Park

India Point Park
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6

It depends on how you define "work". And it depends on the lens with which you are working. If it means everything will work the way it does as you are now shooting with only the EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 lens the answer is no. Autofocus: Because your T3 limits your auto focus system to lenses with maximum apertures of f/5.6 or wider, even a 1.4x ...


5

I've been a professional long-lens bird/nature shooter since the 80's. I used to use very big and pricey dedicated video cameras/lenses, but now have found the wonderful micro-4/3 world and love it. I've gotten some amazing shots, both video and stills, by adapting older long telephoto lenses to my Panasonic G6 and GH3, as well as my Olympus E-PL5 and E-M5 ...


4

Short answer: No, they use underwater lamps with normal light (maybe more intense light than a normal underwater lighting device) and coloured filters for the lens. Note that I said "coloured filters" without saying what colour the filter should be. This is because the colour of the filter one would use for underwater photography depends on the depth you ...


3

Teleconverters tend to be better when used on f/2.8 or faster lenses and on primes vs. zooms. Adding one to a 70-300 consumer-grade zoom (if you don't have the L version of the 70-300) is problematic at best, since most of these are f/5.6 lenses at the long end, and adding even just a 1.4x tc to it makes it an f/8 lens--at which point an entry-level dSLR ...


3

The focus on outdoors use and specifically the combination of backpacking and canoeing/kayaking make this a difficult recommendation, I think, if you are focused on learning photography instead of just "taking pictures." For backpacking, I'm not excited about the notion of taking a full-frame DSLR along. Back in the day I carried a film SLR a few times and ...


3

There are several different methods that can be used for this: Thermal imaging - Recording radiation in the long-infrared range (9,000-14,000nm), ie heat. Most animals are much warmer than their surroundings, so will show up clearly in an image. Disadvantages are thermal cameras can be very expensive, are usually fairly low resolution. Also it may not show ...


3

I also had to make this choice. For the TC you must be 100% sure that it goes with your lens. The advantage of a TC is that it is cheaper, smaller, and lighter. A 150-500 will be more expensive, bigger, and heavier but a better aperture. If possible I would recommend rental of a 150-500. This gives you the possibility to test it out for real. If you like ...


3

When you use a larger sensored camera, you're going to be working with a thinner depth of field either due to using a longer lens, or from being closer to the subject to get the same framing. The reason the Fuji and Nikon bridge cameras don't have as much trouble focusing is that with a smaller 1/2.3"-format sensor and a superzoom lens that has 500mm or so ...


3

Switch the camera to using a single auto-focus spot in the middle of the frame. Most high end cameras have this capability. I don't know if your Sony camera can do that or how it will show you the spot if it does, but look around the owners manual. On my Nikon, the autofocus spots are shown as small red rectangles in the viewfinder. You point the spot at ...


2

Bird photography is the kind of situation where you have to select one of the auto-focus point (usually the center one). With such setting, you have a better control where the focus is done (as the camera will not switch between the focus-points). Furthermore you do not really care if the subject is right in the center of the image as, most of the time, you ...


2

As a bird photographer (I was founder of the bird photography group on G+) I have to say that photographing birds is hard. The areas around birds tend to be clutters (leaves, branches, etc) and this can confuse the autofocus. Light is normally marginal so you need the large apertures, which narrows depth of field, so any auto focus mistake kills the image. ...


2

I'm not sure there's even a Canon TC that will work with that lens, which means a lower quality TC. And loss of at least one stop of light. All in all, perhaps not better quality than simply enlarging the critter when editing the photo. Not only that, but auto focus may suffer a bit, so that can degrade image quality as well. Unfortunately, TC's work best ...


2

The problem here is that once you threw in "wildlife at a distance", you pretty much nixed most everything else except for dSLRs as well as the "starter" part of the equation. Wildlife, especially fast-moving wildlife, is a very specialized and equipment-demanding type of shooting that causes some of us to blow thousands of bucks on a lens and a higher-end ...


1

Learning photography is much less about the equipment and much more about pushing yourself to learn. You can learn the basics of photography on essentially anything that allows for manual control of shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Other aspects such as different focal length lenses, flash photography, and so on can be additional topics that one can learn ...


1

This is sort of a trite answer, but the best camera is the one you have with you, that you are most likely to use and/or have handy. There are all sorts of amazing photo essays and very artistic shots done completely on mobile phones, or with outdoors point-and-shoots. I won't recommend specific models or even brands, but considering your outdoor activity, ...


1

The good news is that digital cameras handle outdoor photography the easiest. There tends to be plenty of light and subjects rarely move fast. Any modern DSLR will do and something in the mid-range will allow you to learn photographic controls to exercise your creativity. There are also several weather-sealed models which will allow you to do outdoor ...


1

A teleconverter will magnify the image produced by your lens on the sensor, but will not produce a better resolution than your original lens had. It just cannot: it comes after the lens on the optical path. In other words, if two points were too small/far away to be distinguishable with your lens, the teleconverter will not allow you to distinguish them. ...


1

A converter will decrease your lenses lowest aperture, or make it less useful when it gets darker or shady. Plus, you are limited to a 1.4x converter, as the 2.0 converter will likely cause issues with the autofocus on your lens, since most Canon cameras require f5.6 or better to focus. The 2x converter adds 2 stops. At 300mm, your lens is already at f5.6, ...


1

When you took the photo with a 300mm length, it got cropped on a crop sensor. You didn't actually get a 450mm photo, but still a 300mm cropped photo. With full frame, it will still take the same photo but without any cropping. If you crop it in photoshop then you will get the exact same photo as your crop camera... you are basically not missing out on any ...


1

To get the same reach as the long end of your 70-300mm lens on an APS-C body, you need a lens with a focal length of 450mm on the D750. To get any Nikon lens with that kind of focal length at f/5.6 or wider requires a substantial expenditure compared to what you paid for the 70-300. The Nikon 500mm f/4 sells for about $7,900 new. The 400mm f/2.8 runs a ...


1

To get the equivalent FoV ("reach") on full frame that a 70-300 has on 1.5 crop would require a (70-300)*1.5 = 105-450mm lens. This will probably be at least twice as expensive as a 70-300, and will definitely be larger and more difficult to handle. Make sure you're ok with the possibility of relearning technique or adding stabilization--and possibly ...


1

A 600mm lens on m4/3 gives a 1200mm equivalent. That's an incredibly narrow field of view, probably too narrow for most subjects. Also, I'd want that absolutely locked on the steadiest tripod and head I could find (and mounting to the lens rather than the body), and firing via a remote release. Anything else would be an exercise in frustration and camera ...



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